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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1916 portable reloading tool made by Newton Arms of Buffalo New York specifically for the .256 Newton:




only for the .256 Newton:


very clear instructions:


The directions relate to the parts lettered on the diagram:


The seater die is adjusted by putting something in the holes on the die and rotating it in and out, shorter or longer. It's no worse on the plastic-tipped bullets than any modern seater die:


The neck sizer applies the correct amount and length of tension. I think the case shoulder can be "bumped" back a little by threading the die out, screwing it down. I'm still experimenting with that:


Regretfully I'm missing the decapping punch and the primer pin. Spent primers are removed with a hammer and a punch or by screwing the decapper into the sizer die assembly, pushing the spent primer out while sizing. New primers are set by sliding the casing in the "outside" shell holder, loading a primer in the hole, and then setting the primer by lowering the primer tool that is screwed into the sizer die assembly.

It's an innovative tool in a compact package. I'm still learning how to use it.
 

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2nd dangdest thing I've ever seen.
 

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Way cool!

Ive always liked those little handheld loaders
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Way cool!

Ive always liked those little handheld loaders
Yeah, I still use the Lee handloader for a lot of cartridges.

From the Newton Arms Company Modern High Power Rifles and Ammunition manufacturers and dealers book:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Newton sizer die provides more bullet neck tension than the RCBS neck sizer die.

Neck ID after sizing: 0.2590" for Newton vs 0.2615" for RCBS.

hmmm

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Maybe it's set for more neck tension due to lack of a crimping feature??? Back in the day, folks seemed to like having their bullets very firmly lodged in place.

The Newton die could be designed for thinner brass of the time period as well??

Basically, I have no idea.-----SS
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Maybe it's set for more neck tension due to lack of a crimping feature??? Back in the day, folks seemed to like having their bullets very firmly lodged in place.

The Newton die could be designed for thinner brass of the time period as well??

Basically, I have no idea.-----SS
Yeah...0.001" difference in neck ID is a lot in 6.5mm. The reason I say that is if I have to pull a bullet sized with the Newton tool I have to use a collet puller, a kinetic won't pull the bullet. So there's a lot of neck tension. Newton did everything he could to max out the pressure; powder, long projectiles and then long COALs for more case capacity, a rifle bore with less resistance but that still sealed off back pressure, the best chrome-vanadium steel of the day, and a tough, and unique, locking lug system.

I have Newton factory new and Newton once-fired factory ammo from the 1910s. Also have Winchester factory new and Winchester once-fired factory ammo from 1940s (my guess). I have reloaded both old Newton and old Winchesters. Both factory Newton and Winchester have heavy crimps.

.256 Newton brass thickness averages:
Newton - 0.0130"
Winchester -0.0140"
Quality Cartridge - 0.0130"
Jamison - 0.0135"
Formed R P 25-06 - 0.0130"
Formed Winchester 270 - 0.0145"

I don't know if I'm going to get to 3000 fps with IMR4350; too much case head expansion, the over-sized chamber. The web pushes out quite a bit to form up against the big chamber so it pulls on the head some. Hey SS, got any DuPont 17 1/2?

I hate reloading; too complicated, too many bad things can happen. I'm gonna go cook something. :grin:

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
so what caliber is the .256 newton?
it's not a .257?
is it a smaller case than the .30 newton?
Great questions, same questions I had when first exposed to the round. The .256 Newton is not .257", but a .264"; that's 6.7mm....so it takes a 6.5mm bullet.............. It's all about how you measure the bore. Do you measure to the top or bottom of the rifling?

The .256 Newton case is a necked-down 30-06 with a different shoulder angle. The .30 Newton case is an oddball, considerably larger than the .256 Newton. Closest thing is a 11.2mm Mauser. It's a big case. Newton got 3,000 fps out of a long 170 gr .308" bullet in 1913.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
bump
 
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