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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife is dying for a camp trailer. I just keep thinking "can't you just go behind a bush?". Apparently that isn't an option, and thus we have to buy a trailer.

We have an older lady that lives in our neighborhood that has a 22' Wave Thor 22RB for sale. I think it is a 2007.

It is very clean. No water damage. Appliances work, although I would need a new plug for the water heater, and maybe even replacement. Tires need replacement (x4). Light plug has been drug and worn -- it may need replacement. Everything else looks really good.

We've suggested her $7k asking price is too high. She will come down to $6500. I still think that might be too high -- what do you guys think? what would you reasonably expect for a trailer like this?
 

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You and your wife will love it. First night we spent in our "new to us" camp trailer, middle of the night my boy said "I'm getting cold", I said ok hold on, reached up and bumped the thermostat... then the furnace kicked on. Love it :D

As for price that seems pretty reasonable if its in good condition. We have a 2005 Dutchmen 18B I'd guess it to be worth $6k. Trailers tend to depreciate pretty quickly then level off.

Anywho I'd snag it if I were in the market. Nylon hotware plugs only last a few years regardless. You should replace the hot water plug with a brass plug that has a built in drain valve, for easy winterization. Tires arent too bad. If they are worn in a odd pattern that tends to mean loose wheel bearings.

I dont know what you mean by "light plug" though.

-DallanC
 

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I think that the light plug he is talking about is the trail light plug to the truck, and if it is it is easily replaced and any auto parts store or trailer store should handle them.

On the trailer I would just make sure that everything works. Fill up all the holding tanks and look around and see if you can see any leaks, if the water tank is the type that holds pressure make sure that it holds pressure. While checking it I would also fill the gray and black water tanks and check them out also. Then turn on the propane and get a bucket filled with real soapy water and start checking all the connections for leaks, with the soapy water you will see bubbles.

Bearings on trailers should be repacked every one to two years depending on how much you use it. I do my 16' flatbed every two years. I don't want to be one of those guys that you see sitting on the side of the road with the tire off trying to figure out what they are going to do.

You might even check with a trailer dealer and see if they do pre sale inspections on a trailer. It might be money well spent. They may even be able to give you a fair market value of it.
 

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inspection is a great idea.
Some plugs can have an anode in it, good idea. that is what mine uses. The little tiny drain ****s are about worthless IMHO, just too small that drain too slowly and clog easily.
KSL values are often too high and many trailers have most of the options as standard, so you dont add any values for them, most sellers dont read the notes and add them as options even though they are included in the base price. I dont think I would pay more than what it books for, a good negotiating tactic is simply that you cant get a loan for more than what it is actually worth. They will struggle to sell it at all if that is the case as most people dont have a freaking dime to put down on a purchase, yet are buying a recreational item for $20k+.
Just make sure that it is one that work well for you, are there enough beds? Enough room to get around? beds big enough, bed claustraphobic mashed into teh corner?
if you get teh EX lube axles you dont have to repack them, many that are this new have them and make it very easy to repack the bearings w/o even getting your hands dirty. All of those repairs are extremely easy.
If it has been sitting for long the batteries will often be bad, if there is room for two batteries I recommend looking into 6volt golf cart batteries; they are awesome. may even consider changing light bulbs for LED, you can get a lot fo them on eBay for cheap and they save tons of power.
 

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I want you to get it too...that way, you could pull it over on the Boulder with your new truck for our archery hunt and we wouldn't have to worry about bad weather. A trailer like that for that price is a steal...I say buy it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
the "light plug" is the trailer wire harness plug. Yes, they are easily replaced, as are tires, batteries, etc.

My biggest concern is still the water heater. Replacing the plug (with anode) isn't an issue. My concern is the female "drain" (not the plug itself).



Any thoughts on this?

W2U -- I've thought plenty about you and richard. You two can share the table-bed. both of you can also go behind a bush!
 

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Get a small wire brush and clean the threads and flush the heater out a few times. If you were able to unscrew the anode/plug then it should be OK.
 

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Get a small wire brush and clean the threads and flush the heater out a few times. If you were able to unscrew the anode/plug then it should be OK.
I just fixed mine that had this same corrosion as your picture. I replaced the plug/anode rod from camper world and bought a 3/4 NPT tap. It matches the plug threads on my trailer. I then used the tap to clean out the corrosion. It was way to bad for a wire brush. It now threads in by hand. I got my tap from NAPA. It was $20-$30. Well worth the extra effort.
 
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