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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was wondering if anyone here has ever done any loading for the .300 Tejas. A little while back I picked up a Wasatch Precision rifle chambered in this wildcat caliber and the former owner never did any handloading himself. From what I've been told Wasatch Precision became Cross Canyon Arms when Gunsmith Brad Stair, the creator the Tejas family, left the company.

I went up to CCA to pick up a set of custom dies and they said they would be happy to help with data. They were plenty friendly, but as they dug through their files they only came up with two loads, both using a 185gr bullet, with RL-25 and Retumbo. No info on case trim length, cartridge over all length or any of the other conventional measurements ya get so used to having in your load books. There was no min-load, max-load info, they just said start at XXgr of powder and work up til ya hit XXXXfps. Seems like a recipe for disaster if a beginner was to follow that advice. Going a few hundredths of an inch deeper with bullet depth can have a surprising effect on pressure. They might hit max pressure well before they achieved the specified velocity.

I'm not super worried about creating a dangerous load. I have since measured the chamber and throat to determine proper case length and bullet depth. I plan on using QuickLoad to develop some starter loads when I get a minute. Just curious if anyone here has played around with the caliber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Waspo. I did a bit of searching online before posting, didn't come up with anything especially useful. I was hoping that since Wasatch and CCA were Utah outfits that maybe some folks around here might know the caliber.
 

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With most of the "improved" cartridges, the standard practice is to use data from the parent case as a starting load. Then add powder until you can't open the bolt or primers blow out. Back off a grain or two, and you have "your" maximum load. No need to worry about trimming brass, because the primer pockets will have expanded well past usable long before your cases stretch to the point they need trimming. Being a wildcat, there is no "maximum" pressure to worry about. Load it up to the velocity you think you need and you're good. You do have a chronograph, don't you? If not you can just pull a number out of the air. Just make sure it is a good one so your shooting buddies will be impressed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do have chrono, Loke. Trimming will be a necessity with this rifle, probably a match chamber cut to min spec. But I was given a box of custom ammo with the rifle, not sure if Wasatch or Cross Canyon loaded it, but about half of the cartridges were noticeably longer necked and didn't appear to have been chamfered or deburred. They refused to be chambered at all. I also think loading any long range caliber without trimming would be foolish, even if the rounds all chambered correctly. Different length necks would cause differences in neck tension that could have been easily avoided.
 

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180gr bullets at 22-250 speeds doesn't seem like alot of fun to shoot... hopefully it included a 6pack of replacement barrels.


-DallanC
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
180gr bullets at 22-250 speeds doesn't seem like alot of fun to shoot... hopefully it included a 6pack of replacement barrels.

-DallanC
Ya sure wouldn't think so, I expected it to be a bit of a bruiser. But its' muzzle brake works exceptionally well. I'd say with a moderate load that it's recoil is less than a full house .30-06 load. It's surprisingly pleasant to shoot. I'm not certain I'd want to hunt with the brake on, as I don't usually wear plugs in the field. I think I might finally go deaf if I shot that thing with the brake and no ear-pro...

RandomElk, That would be great. Hope your hunt goes well.
 
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