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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am looking for help/advice on starting reloads. havent done it before. I have a remington 300wsm that I prefer to shoot 180 grain accubond out of for elk and deer. So what primers, powder, etc does everyone like?? And I wouldn't mind negative feed back
 

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Bjorne Lou Tsar
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Funny thing, I'm right in the middle of load development for my 300WSM. I've have a couple good loads for the 168 Amax and 168 HPBT Hornadys. Right now my friend and I are working on 208 Amax loads. He has his shooting great out of his 300WM and I'm having a hard time getting mine to fly right. We both have 1-10, 24" barrels.
I know you want to shoot 180s but consider the 208s. If you look at the ballistics...wow! They should be great for elk. From my research, I think you'll find IMR/H 4350 or RL17 good powders. RL17 shows higher velocities before you start to see high pressure signs.

If you consider 208s:
Hodgdon recommends starting H4350 @ 56.4 - 60.7 and IMR4350 57.7 - 62.0C.
Reliant (via phone call) recommend starting RL17 @ 56.0 - 62.0

If you consider the 186s, I found two good loads at 64.5 and 66.5 grains of IMR4350 jammed into the lands about .003".
I know you wanted to shoot 180s and I haven't got to those yet but this might help if you decide to shoot something else.

Here's a peek at my field notes. I usually transfer and organize it better when I get home.
 

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If you are just starting to reload go down to the store and purchase yourself a reloading manual. If you like shooting accubonds get a Nosler manual. There is so much more information in that manual than just reloading recipes. Then one you have the manual read everything in the front part of it up to the first caliber in the reloading section. Then if you have questions come on back and ask them.

The big piece of information in the manuals is that it will tell you to work up a load and not to start at the maximum. You have to understand pressure signs along with a few other things. I would also never start putting a cartridge together using someone elses load data without backing it off 10% or so and then working back up to it.

I have loads for quite a few of my rifles that would be unsafe in others. Also pick yourself up a note book like longbow shows and write down what you are putting together and what it does at the range. That book is a lot better than your memory.
 

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Check out the reloading recipe section, there is a section on this very cartridge, my personal favorite. I have found that starting with other's recipes can help narrow it down; certainly each one is different., but they can give you a good starting point. Good luck!

I kind of missed the part about starting out; I think the most important part is to do more than just read every reloading manual cover to cover (not the actual charts, but the instructions) then to get a mentor who can explain how it all happens in practice. Being all new terms you can learn a lot and you will find many willing to help to help spread the disease. Where are you located? I think it is helpful to also see how the different pieces work and possibly see a few different set ups to know what to buy for your own setup.
 
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