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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shot this last weekend. Thought it was a cotton top with all the white?? Sorry about the pic its from a phone!! Everybody says it is a redhead with some pigment problem. Has the size, wings and beak of a redhead. The glowing part of the head is white!!! Let me know what you ALL think??? :idea: http://s238.photobucket.com/albums/ff30 ... G00034.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Im 95% sure it is a redhead. Is it a mix or some sort of pigment disorder? When I picked it up the head was under it body and I said hen redhead. Just wondering if wants to be a blonde :?: Its in the Freezer! Does it belong on the wall or just a pic to remember it??
 

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I agree with the redhead with a pigment problem. Personally, I would just enjoy the picture on that bird, but if you really want to get it mounted, I'm not gonna stop ya!
 

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By the looks of the bill and the neck the duck is surely a redhead and it is leucistic.
Someone posted a pic of a leucistic Canada Goose on the old UDWR forum last winter. Not uncommon to see it in robins and blackbirds.

The condition is often called "piebald", especially when referring to mammals or Michael Jackson about 7 years ago.

See:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucism
 

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It's a Redhead hen with a little "piebald " action going on. Or, it's just a bird of the year and has a lot of pin feathers in the head and neck area.
 

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If it was an albino, skin would be pink everywhere and the eyes would be a reddish pink. Cool duck.... Its hard to tell whats up from the cell picture though. Are those white or gray feathers or is that shine from the camera flash?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Had a biologist look at it and said the same thing (leucism). It is a hen so does it still belong on the wall :?: Maybe downstairs somewhere :!: :!: :!: Jessie how has the south end been this year? Thanks 4 all the help on this one.
 

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wyogoob said:
By the looks of the bill and the neck the duck is surely a redhead and it is leucistic.
Someone posted a pic of a leucistic Canada Goose on the old UDWR forum last winter. Not uncommon to see it in robins and blackbirds.
WG is onto something here, however this happens quite frequently with redheads (I've seen a few) as well as most any bird; its just old! :shock:

As birds age they lose pigment in their plumage, and often large areas will grown out white/grey...kinda like us. :lol: (if ya wanna get fancy you can use the "L" word. :wink: )

'Course most gamebirds don't live all that long. I used to raise a duck called a Black East India Duck. They are basically a domesticated pure black form of the mallard...anywho, after 7-8 years they would start to get white feathering around the eyes and beak. I used to see it in our chickens as well.
 

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InvaderZim said:
wyogoob said:
By the looks of the bill and the neck the duck is surely a redhead and it is leucistic.
Someone posted a pic of a leucistic Canada Goose on the old UDWR forum last winter. Not uncommon to see it in robins and blackbirds.
WG is onto something here, however this happens quite frequently with redheads (I've seen a few) as well as most any bird; its just old! :shock:

As birds age they lose pigment in their plumage, and often large areas will grown out white/grey...kinda like us. :lol: (if ya wanna get fancy you can use the "L" word. :wink: )

'Course most gamebirds don't live all that long. I used to raise a duck called a Black East India Duck. They are basically a domesticated pure black form of the mallard...anywho, after 7-8 years they would start to get white feathering around the eyes and beak. I used to see it in our chickens as well.
Very true, but not all piebald animals are old (relative to their species). Most have lost pigment from things other than age. Most leucistic amimals are genetically mutated. Piebaldness in mammals, especially whitetail deer, is noticebale at an early age.

I noticed one of your North Dakota pheasants had some pigment trouble on it's crown. Do You think that was an old bird? I have gotten some real old birds around Beulah ND before.

I myself am losing some pigment on my head and chin. I think I will teach my grandkids to use the term "leucistic" instead of "gray-haired old bas*$^&%!
 

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wyogoob said:
Very true, but not all piebald animals are old (relative to their species). Most have lost pigment from things other than age. Most leucistic amimals are genetically mutated. Piebaldness in mammals, especially whitetail deer, is noticebale at an early age.

I noticed one of your North Dakota pheasants had some pigment trouble on it's crown. Do You think that was an old bird? I have gotten some real old birds around Beulah ND before.

I myself am losing some pigment on my head and chin. I think I will teach my grandkids to use the term "leucistic" instead of "gray-haired old bas*$^&%!
Agreed, and point taken.

However, you'll notice that the bird is "graying" near the eyes, beak and throat only (and prolly a few of the wing feathers) which is why I suspect age rather than genetic mutation. If these white patches occurred at random areas across the body, I'd be more apt to suspect the "L" word.

Funny story. I used to have a friend that also had red hair (we were often mistaken for brothers, which come to think of it was quite a disservice to me. :mrgreen: ). Hung out as kids, got into trouble, that sort of thing...any who, he had a small patch of white in his hair (2" x 2".) Ok, it's not really a funny story per say...but at least it's relevant. :wink:
 
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