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I am thinking about venturing into the world of archery, again. I have been looking at bows, sights, and all that other jazz. When I shot before, I felt like 5 pins covered up a lot of the target. I have looked at the single pin sights; as well as the sights where the top two pins are fixed, with the third pin being a slider.

Then I found this;

http://www.truglo.com/archery-sight...ro.asp?catid=14EF030088AA44CBAC06E6F08F4B71C1

Does anyone use one of these? If so, what do you think about it?

I counted the phrase "long distance accuracy" twice, which is a nice selling point, but not something I really care about. I know my limitations, and am fine with passing on shots that are outside my limitations.
 

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I have a tru glow and it is alright it isn't really as bright as you would hope for it to be in a low light situation. I would worry about having the sight in the link only being one pin. When you are stalking your game anything can happen so I would want to be able to shoot to my limits without having to adjust my sight to the right range first and have you're target disappear into the trees as you do. That's why I think it is useful to have more than one pin. I have buddies that shoot the black gold slider sight and they are freakin sweet. So with my new rig I will definitely be shooting black gold. And if you don't like the 5 pin they have 3 pin sliders that are great.
 

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I have a tru glow and it is alright it isn't really as bright as you would hope for it to be in a low light situation. I would worry about having the sight in the link only being one pin. When you are stalking your game anything can happen so I would want to be able to shoot to my limits without having to adjust my sight to the right range first and have you're target disappear into the trees as you do. That's why I think it is useful to have more than one pin. I have buddies that shoot the black gold slider sight and they are freakin sweet. So with my new rig I will definitely be shooting black gold. And if you don't like the 5 pin they have 3 pin sliders that are great.
I use to think the same thing about having 1 pin... but then I realize if I don't have time to range the animal, and quickly turn a dial... I don't have enough time for a proper shot anyway.. IMO
 

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I agree Random. I also set my pin at 33 yards when I am out and about. That puts me 6" high at 20 and 6" low at 40. That is all I need to gap those shots if I get caught in a quick shot. and if I have time to range setting the pin is extremely fast. My brain has a hard time even shooting multiple pins anymore.
 

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I have both and in my opinion both have a place. I love my single pin for shooting 3D and I would have no problem hunting with it. I have a 3 pin slider that's on my hunting bow and I love the adjustability of it. I have been playing with the thought of turning that 3 pin into a 2 pin and sight in at 30 and be good all the way out to 40 with the top pin and still be able to slide down to whatever yardage I need past that. Either way I don't think you can go wrong.
 

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The one in the photo you provided shows a lense with the pin drawn on the lense. I think it's illegal in utah to use a lense on a bow

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The one in the photo you provided shows a lense with the pin drawn on the lense. I think it's illegal in utah to use a lense on a bow

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I am glad you pointed that out! Here is the archery equipment rules copied directly from the DNR's webpage:

R657-5-11. Archery Equipment.

(1) Archery equipment may be used during any big game hunt, except a muzzleloader hunt, provided:
(a) the minimum bow pull is 40 pounds at the draw or the peak, whichever comes first; and
(b) arrowheads used have two or more sharp cutting edges that cannot pass through a 7/8 inch ring;
(c) expanding arrowheads cannot pass through a 7/8 inch ring when expanded, and
(d) arrows must be a minimum of 20 inches in length from the tip of the arrowhead to the tip of the nock, and must weigh at least 300 grains.
(2) The following equipment or devices may not be used to take big game:
(a) a crossbow, except as provided in Subsection (5) and Rule R657-12;
(b) arrows with chemically treated or explosive arrowheads;
(c) a mechanical device for holding the bow at any increment of draw, except as provided in Subsection (5) and Rule R657-12;
(d) a release aid that is not hand held or that supports the draw weight of the bow, except as provided in Subsection (5) and Rule R657-12; or
(e) a bow with an attached electronic range finding device or a magnifying aiming device.
(3) Arrows carried in or on a vehicle where a person is riding must be in an arrow quiver or a closed case.
(4)(a) A person who has obtained an archery permit for a big game hunt may :
(i) use only archery equipment authorized in Subsections (1) and (2) to take the species authorized in the permit; and
(ii) not possess or be in control of a crossbow, draw-lock, rifle, shotgun or muzzleloader while in the field during an archery hunt.
(A) "Field" for purposes of this section, means a location where the permitted species of wildlife is likely to be found. "Field" does not include a hunter's established campsite or the interior of a fully enclosed automobile or truck.
(b) The provisions of Subsection (a) do not apply to:
(i) a person licensed to hunt upland game or waterfowl provided the person complies with Rules R657-6 and R657-9 and the Upland Game Guidebook and Waterfowl Guidebook, respectively, and possessing only the weapons authorized to take upland game or waterfowl;
(ii) a person licensed to hunt big game species during hunts that coincide with the archery hunt, provided the person is in compliance with the regulations of that hunt and possesses only the weapons authorized for that hunt;
(iii) livestock owners protecting their livestock;
(iv) a person licensed to carry a concealed weapon in accordance with Title 53, Chapter 5, Part 7 of the Utah Code, provided the person is not utilizing the concealed firearm to hunt or take protected wildlife; or
(v) a person possessing a crossbow or draw-lock under a certificate of registration issued pursuant to R657-12.
(5) A person who has obtained an any weapon permit for a big game hunt may use archery equipment authorized in this Section to take the species authorized in the permit, including a crossbow or draw-lock.
(6)(a) A crossbow used to hunt big game must have:
(i) a minimum draw weight of 125 pounds;
(ii) a minimum draw length of 14 inches, measured between the latch (nocking point) and where the bow limbs attach to the stock;
(iii) an overall length of at least 24 inches; measured between the butt stock end and where the bow limbs attach to the stock; and
(iv) a positive mechanical safety mechanism.
(b) A crossbow arrow or bolt used to hunt big game must be at least 16 inches long and have:
(i) fixed broadheads that are at least 7/8 inch wide at the widest point; or
(ii) expandable, mechanical broadheads that are at least 7/8 inch wide at the widest point when the broadhead is in the open position.
(c) It is unlawful for any person to:
(i) hunt big game with a crossbow during a big game archery hunt, except as provided in R657-12-8;
(ii) carry a ****ed crossbow containing an arrow or a bolt while in or on any motorized vehicle on a public highway or other public right-of-way, except as provided in R657-12-4; or
(iii) hunt any protected wildlife with a crossbow:
(A) bolt that has any chemical, explosive or electronic device attached;
(B) that has an attached electronic range finding device; or
(C) that has an attached magnifying aiming device, except as provided in Subsection (7).
(7) A crossbow used to hunt big game during an any weapon hunt may have a fixed or variable magnifying scope.

The only issue that I could find is the part highlighted in red. If the lens is nonmagnifying, I would think it would be legal.
 

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CPAJeff, Just to let you know some of that language is out of date. They just approved the use of a bow mounted rangefinder but still cannot use a magnifying lens.
 
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