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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering using a hammock system this year in lieu of a tent when I back pack into my hunting area. For those of you who have gone this route, what advise / lessons learned / words of wisdom can you shed on this subject? Seems it would be really mobile as well as light.
 

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I'll try anything once and a hammock sucks.

I recommend a fly. Big Agnes has some good ones.

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When you are up in a hammock and it gets cold it is like a refrigerator on it. That is unless you have a lot of insulation under your bag. They wouldn't be bad for summer fishing trips but I don't know about using one during hunting seasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wyo... elaborate on your comment.

We went on an outing last month with scouts and one of the leaders had a tent hammock. He speaks highly of it. I have been watching u-tube and gathering info. My experience would be during the Archery hunt in August. I know that you need to have an insulator on the bottom or the air flow will/can make you cold. It would be like sleeping on an air mattress on top of the snow.
 

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My dad and brother each use hammocks. They have a clarks jungle hammock and an "exo"?? Cant remember for sure the second one. Anyways, they both sleep very well and warm. They are using big agnes bags with the insulated pads.

I use a Big Agnes Fly creek 2 tent. Works for me. I may try the hammock this year to cut down my pack size.
 

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stalker, you're thinking of ENO, as in eagle's nest outfitters. if you go that route, just don't pay full price, they're always on clearance somewhere. to be honest, when we went to the field in the marines, I slept in mine instead of on the ground. and actually even had one in afghaniland. it works dang good. even in the cold, I'd get in my sleeping bag and bivvy sack and then fall over into it. its a 10 out of 10 as compared to the ground and I've even woke up with frost on my sleeping bag/hammock. with the right sleeping bag and water proofing bag, it can still be really warm, especially if talking august/September. and light weight. also buy the "doublenest" as In the one rated for 2 people. im 6'1" and 220 lbs. its way better than the single nest.
 

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I did a trip (not hunting) in the West Virgnia mountains with a hammock tent. It was probably the worst sleep ive ever had. The first night is nice but you start to miss support.

Also, if it gets windy its like sleeping on the deck of a boat on the ocean for the first time... buddy of mine got pretty bad motion sickness.

The thing was cold, unstable, uncomfortable, and just a bad overall choice. I forget the brand, i soon sold it on craigslist, but the retail was in the $200 range so it was no cheapie. Stick to a fly or a tent.
 

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And it hard to use if there's not many tree around. Like on the face of Timp. or someplace like that.
 

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Dig a shoulder hole, sleep on the ground. I stuff my clothes into a game bag and use that as a pillow. Sleep like a baby.-----SS
 

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Why are you thinking hammock? For comfort? Or to minimize weight? Or both?
I've hammocked, and found that I slept well for a night, but did miss the support.

As the weather gets colder, weight savings go out the window as you have to add insulation (either pads or under-quilts or both).
 

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Whenever I think of sleeping in a hammock in the back country, I imagine a bear walking up and seeing you wiggling around in it and that bear perking up like a fat kid hearing a microwave full of Hot Pockets go "ding!"
 

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I've been a long time bivy hunter and sleep in the dirt all the time.

I've been out a couple of times with alpinebowhunter who lurks around here some and as much as I hate those hammocks, he seems to be pretty stylin in his every time while I'm getting rained and snowed on laying in the mud and puddles on the ground. Maybe he'll chime in as he loves those hammocks and has it well sorted out.

I may have to give one a try some time, but I'm not buying one until I know if I can learn to sleep in the thing.

With all that said at 50 something, a hard side camper is sounding better and better all the time. Do they allow you to park those up on Cardiff pass :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am thinking Hammock so I can pack into an area while bow hunting and be able to stay the night in my area to be able to hunt until dark and first light. It will get me away from the crowds, be light and able to carry all my hunting gear in a day pack.
 

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c3 I certainly feel for you getting all soggy on the ground late season while I am dry and elevated. I use the jungle hammock north american which is the 4 season model. It provides you with lots of pockets on the bottom to store gear and create insulation. You can also buy add on insulation but I have not done that yet.

Like Pete said I spend plenty of days in mine most years from early season scouting to temps in the teens on the front. In 2013 I spent around 25 nights in mine scouting and hunting for elk. I really like not sleeping on the hard, uneven and wet ground and being able to sleep on really steep terrain without worry. I will say there is a learning curve and I am a little smaller than most. I certainly have my preference in tie-offs I look for. I want tie-off spots to be between 12 and 15 feet apart and then you figure out the tension wanted to moderate sag, swing and support. the span and tension really have a big effect on how well you will sleep.

I have not used a pad with mine in any situation. I have been cold but I don't notice any difference between my hammock and the ground in that regards as I sleep cold all the time. Getting my down bag has helped the most to help me stay warn but I am pretty sure I need that thing no matter where I sleep.
I will agree there are not the best in all situations but neither is a bivy or one man tent. For what I do I will carry my hammock 99% of the time and when it won't work I will bust out the 2 man tent once in a blue moon and quickly see how much I hate the 1% I don't have my hammock.
 

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I will add another vote for the hammocks suck! But everyone is different and you may very well like sleeping in one. As mentioned above look at getting some type of insulation under you by either using a insulated sleeping pad or an underquilt. For quilts look at www.hammockgear.com. If you are looking at a hammock to help shed weight try considering a floorless shelter with a bug bivy or nest if being used during the august or september. During the later months you can ditch the bivy or nest and when its cold can add a titanium stove for a small weight penalty. I just picked up the seek outside cimarron, 94 sqft of usable tent space. With stove jack, center pole, pegs and guylines it comes in at 52 ounces.
 

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Wyo... elaborate on your comment.

We went on an outing last month with scouts and one of the leaders had a tent hammock. He speaks highly of it. I have been watching u-tube and gathering info. My experience would be during the Archery hunt in August. I know that you need to have an insulator on the bottom or the air flow will/can make you cold. It would be like sleeping on an air mattress on top of the snow.
We had a hammock in our back yard growing up. One of those with a metal frame. It was wonderful, well the frame thingie was wonderful, not unsteady like the ones with only 2 tie-off ropes. And I didn't use the contraption for over-night sleeping either. I wouldn't want to take it backpacking though.

IMO compared to sleeping on the ground they are uncomfortable, cold, hard to get in and out of, and there's not all that much weight savings compared to today's lightweight backpacking tents. If you are one of those guys that toss and turns or has a "kink" in your back; you're not gonna like a hammock. uh....Finding 2 trees the right distance apart can be a challenge sometimes too.

For years I backpacked like a crazy person and hung around a lot of long-range hikers. The only hammock I remember seeing was in North Carolina back in the late 70s. It was a Vietnam War surplus thingie.

I always carry a tent, or a fly, but I just lay on the bare ground unless the weather or mosquitoes get bad.

Too each his own. You won't know until you try it. Good luck.

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I have backpacked on the big game hunts for over 35 years. It's not complicated. You have to be dry and moderately comfortable.

My best advice is to pack your stuff 15 minutes before you leave, not sooner.

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