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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay... Ive only been ice fishing a few times. I would like to target crappie and perch but have absolutely no idea what to do except drill a hole and drop something in it. So I have a few questions, hope a few of you can help me out! :oops:

What depth for perch and crappie?
What kind of bait rig?
Times?
Places? (Im hoping to get out this weekend. Rockport, Echo, or Pineview)
Topo features?
Presentation?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!!!
 

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I copied a post from Grandpa D on page 2 of this forum under the UWN Rockport Ice Fishing Party Thread. He gives some good perch advise right here:

The main ice fishing targets are Trout and Perch. There are Bass in there, but not many are iced.
Twenty feet of water is kind of a seperation between Trout and Perch.
You will catch more Trout in water under 20' deep and more Perch in water deeper than 20".
Small tube jigs and ice flies like Rat Finkies are good tackle.
Tip everything with bait.
Worms, chub meat, Power Bait and Salmon Eggs are all good bait.
Use jig heads that are 1/16 oz or smaller.
White is a good color for jigs along with green and brown.
Glow jig heads and bodies are also good.
Jigging spoons like Sweedish Pimples and small Kastmasters can also catch fish when tiped with bait.
Most fish are found on the bottom looking for food.
Perch will actually be touching the bottom, so keep your jigs right on the bottom.
You can fish with a regular rod and reel, but have good light line on the reel.
I like 4# and not over 6# mono.
Short ice rods are nice but not needed unless you are fishing inside a shelter.
Worm waterproof boots are a must!
Some people use waders with built in boots when there is a lot of slush on the ice, but these boots are not well insulated and you could get cold feet in them.
You can buy hand and feet chemical warmers for about $1.00 a pair and they will stay warm for 6 to 8 hours.
I always take some with me.
Layer your clothing for warmth. A hoodie under a coat is good and wool pants or ski bibs work.
Don't wear jeans as your outer layer if at all possible.
Insulated bibs or overalls are a good choice.
Sun glasses are a must if the sun is out.
Keep your head warm with any type of hat that will cover your ears, when needed.
If you don't know how waterproof your boots are, wear plastic bags between your socks and boots.
Stay dry and warm and the fishing will be fun!
 

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Biggest trick is to find the fish which means you need to be willing to drill new holes and move around if their not biting. Some guys fish morning some afternoon it depends on your schedule I catch fish both. Typically I move depth between 6ft and 25 ft depending on where the fish are hanging out. Get some ice flies and tube jigs, tip them with meal or wax worms, drop them to the bottom and real up 1 or 2 feet. Some guys let it sit some jig it a little. If you use a fish finder its easier to find them but even though I have one I usually leave it at home just cause I like the surprise better than knowing for sure if your on fish. I was on the ice yesterday and drilled 6 holes moving every 15 minutes till I finally found the in 8ft of water, but tomorrow they might be in 20 ft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. Great info!

Guess most of the battle is actually getting out there in the bitter cold and drilling a hole. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This may seem like a stupid question...

When someone mentions "they are at 20ft". Does that mean suspended at 20ft or total depth to bottom should be 20ft?
 

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cfarnwide said:
This may seem like a stupid question...

When someone mentions "they are at 20ft". Does that mean suspended at 20ft or total depth to bottom should be 20ft?
Suspended if "they"=fish
Bottom if "they"=fisherman
 
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cfarnwide said:
Okay... Ive only been ice fishing a few times. I would like to target crappie and perch but have absolutely no idea what to do except drill a hole and drop something in it. So I have a few questions, hope a few of you can help me out! :oops:

What depth for perch and crappie?
What kind of bait rig?
Times?
Places? (Im hoping to get out this weekend. Rockport, Echo, or Pineview)
Topo features?
Presentation?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!!!
Go to Sportsmans and pick up a copy of "Ice Fishing Secrets". It is written by the In-Fisherman guys and it has everything you need to know. I think I paid something like $10.
 

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WeakenedWarrior said:
cfarnwide said:
Okay... Ive only been ice fishing a few times. I would like to target crappie and perch but have absolutely no idea what to do except drill a hole and drop something in it. So I have a few questions, hope a few of you can help me out! :oops:

What depth for perch and crappie?
What kind of bait rig?
Times?
Places? (Im hoping to get out this weekend. Rockport, Echo, or Pineview)
Topo features?
Presentation?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!!!
Go to Sportsmans and pick up a copy of "Ice Fishing Secrets". It is written by the In-Fisherman guys and it has everything you need to know. I think I paid something like $10.
I saw that there, I was wondering if it was any good or worth buying
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Go to Sportsmans and pick up a copy of "Ice Fishing Secrets". It is written by the In-Fisherman guys and it has everything you need to know. I think I paid something like $10.
Darn it!!! I was just there getting supplies. Wish I had checked here before going. :?

This is all great info. I'll be sure to post a report tomorrow when we get back back. Thanks for the advice, its greatly appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, we were skunked at Pineview Saturday.

This did raise another question though.

When using those super tiny rat fink things do you want to use that only? I was having problems knowing if I was on the bottom or not. Also, being so light there was much slack in the line. If I did have a bite I doubt I would have been able to notice it through all that slack. Do I want to add a split shot to help keep the line taught? The line was new, was that part of the problem as well?
 

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cfarnwide said:
Do I want to add a split shot to help keep the line taught? The line was new, was that part of the problem as well?
Well we aren't ice fish'n pros by any means but were having the same issue...getting the line down. :? What we do now is use a small castmaster 1/8 or 1/4 oz remove the treble hook and connect it to a #12/14 swivel. Next we connect the castmaster to another swivel #12/14 with 6-10 inches of line with a smaller swivel #12 at the other end you connect your lure on. This allows you to get your lure down to the bottom then reel up a couple of cranks to get the lure off the bottom. Line will be tight. Plus IMO the castmaster adds a flasher helping potentially attract fish especially in deeper water where its dark.

Next, we've invested in these spring bobber thingys (I know great descripton "thingys") they sell them at Sportsman for about $3 bucks. :mrgreen: They have a charturse bead through wire with flexible metal clasps connecting to your rod and line goes through the loop. It worked great at Hyrum as this "thingy" allows you to see the slightest and I mean slightest nibble on the other end. 8) Here's a picture of the "spring bobber thingy" and the castmaster setup I attempted to describe above. The "spring bobber thingy" worked super fantastic at Hyrum if you saw my post. We we're slaying them. The smallest of nibble this gizmo picks up. Trust me. Another invention I missed out on. Grrrrrr :x

Spring bobber thingy... :)



Castmaster setup... :)



Sure hope this helps you out. Again we are very novice but with a few "pros" giving us info we're doing okay. :wink: :wink:
 

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Another popular jig set up, is to use 2 jigs about 12" apart.
I use a smaller ice fly or jig on top and a larger jig 12" below it.
My best set up this year has been a Maniac Gizzy Bug on a 1/32oz. jig head on top, with a Maniac Ice Cut'r on a 1/16oz. jig head on bottom. The 2 jigs will have enough weight to get down to the bottom. This set up gives you 2 chances for a bite.
Tip both jigs with bait of choice. I like wax worms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Grandpa D said:
Another popular jig set up, is to use 2 jigs about 12" apart.
I use a smaller ice fly or jig on top and a larger jig 12" below it.
My best set up this year has been a Maniac Gizzy Bug on a 1/32oz. jig head on top, with a Maniac Ice Cut'r on a 1/16oz. jig head on bottom. The 2 jigs will have enough weight to get down to the bottom. This set up gives you 2 chances for a bite.
Tip both jigs with bait of choice. I like wax worms.
How do you tie on your second jig? If I were fly fishing Id tie the dropper right on the hook. Would that work for ice fishing as well?
 

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There are several ways to rig up a double jig set up.
Tying line to the first hook behind the barb works, like you use for fly fishing.
You can also add a second lint to the eye of the first hook. I tie in the top jig and leave the tag end about 14" londg I just add the second jig to the long tag end.
Others use a swivel that has one eye on one end and 2 eyes on the other end. This way you add leader to the 2 ends for the jigs, at different lengths.
All work, but try to keep the jigs in a natural horizontal position if possible. If the jigs are hanging verticly, they won't look like a minnow swimming in the water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks guys!

Heading out again this weekend, weather permitting. Im sure I will come back with more questions... :roll: :D
 
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