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i have a small stream i love to catch them in. they are pretty little things. i think the real problem is the stocking of too many bear lake cutts IMO. from where i catch them they would easily survive in uinta and boulder mountain streams. they also live in lakes so i wonder why they are not more heavily stocked. i wonder if they are hard to raise in hatcheries.
 

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chuckmiester said:
i have a small stream i love to catch them in. they are pretty little things. i think the real problem is the stocking of too many bear lake cutts IMO. from where i catch them they would easily survive in uinta and boulder mountain streams. they also live in lakes so i wonder why they are not more heavily stocked. i wonder if they are hard to raise in hatcheries.
The million dollar question right there. I would love to see a move away from stocking rainbows in so many places and other non native species and see more cutts stocked. I am by no means an expert on this, but why aren't there more cutts stocked?
 

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rnf i agree. i think less rainbows should be stocked and more bonneville cutts. i guess bear lake cutts are also on the decline so it is a good thing they are stocked. i dont think the two do well in the same place though. i think they should be stocked more in streams because apparently they do well in them. i have nothing against rainbows though. i love catching them and they do well in put and take fisheries. i guess the hard part is finding suitable habitat for them that arent put and take fisheries and that arent set aside for colorado river cutts which are also on the decline.
 

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Does anyone know where the 27,000 Bonneville Cutts came from that were stocked in Diamond Fork last Fall?
 

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These Bonneville Cutts Came out of the Kamas Fish Hatcery the eggs were taken from the Little Dell Trap in Parleys Canyon, these same fish were stocked into Solider creek (Spanish fork Canyon), Diamond Fork,Little Dell Res, Parleys Creek, Provo River, Weber River, and also many lakes in the Uintas.
 

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Wow, not many people know the name of Soldier Creek in Spanish Fork Canyon. If that's what swims in there, I guess I have caught some Bonneville cutts then. Pretty little fish.

I figured the Bonneville cutts came from Little Dell. Good to know, thanks.
 

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Thats really going to suck if there are a few lakes in Utah that actually have these planted. I dont know if in the heat of the moment I would be able to tell the difference between the Bonneville cutt and the Bear lake cutt. I can see alot of law breaking going on withhout anyone even knowing!!!!
 

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Bear Lake Cutthroat are a Bonneville Cutthroat, that are endemic to Bear Lake!, You are right you won't be able to tell. The cutthroat in most of the Uinta Lakes are Bonneville Cutthroat. For That matter the State. There are just many diifferent strains of the Cutthroat but they are all Decendants of the Bonneville Cutthroat . But as for a pure Strain of Bonneville Cutthroat good Luck finding any, I think the Gentics on that would Take Forever. This endangered stuff has come from a enviormental Group! Not the US fish and Wildlife Service or UDWR.
 

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caddis from what ive found bear lake cutts get silvery when they are caught in lakes. even when they are yellow they are dull yellow. bonnevilles are almost always yellow/pinkish. but thats about the biggest difference. plus from what ive seen bear lake cutts dont like to live in streams except during the spawn.
 

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I am not disagreeing with you, but a fish that lives in a Lake does not have the Same Color Pattern as it would if it lived in stream.An example of that would be in the Strawberry River above Hwy 40. they are the same species of Fish but have tremendously different and Brighter color patterns that the ones living in the reservoir. Most of "Bonneville" that they are talking about live in the Streams all I am saying is that the Bear Lake Cutthroat Are Bonneville Cutthroat that were endemic to Bear Lake after Lake Bonneville
 

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These small guys were wiped out from the water treatment plant to the Jordon river this year in Parleys creek. It is up to all of us to keep these fish in the streams where they are truly the natives. It was great to see them restocked....I have seen more of them in Millcreek this year, This trout belongs here, and should be treated as the de=facto trout _(O)_ ..Whatever it takes to keep 'em going!
 

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LOAH said:
Wow, not many people know the name of Soldier Creek in Spanish Fork Canyon. If that's what swims in there, I guess I have caught some Bonneville cutts then. Pretty little fish.

I figured the Bonneville cutts came from Little Dell. Good to know, thanks.
I didn't know the name of it but I've fished it, caught NOTHING, emailed the DWR and heard nothing back for months... even after several emails and so I assumed there was nothing in there. Sure looks fishy... maybe now I'll have another reason to give it a shot.
 

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Bear River Cutthroat

Bonneville cutts are alive and well in Southwest Wyoming.
Pure strain fish can be found in Thomas Fork, Smiths Fork, Hobble Creek, Salt Creek, Alice Creek and Lake Alice to name a few. The Bear River here has held other species of cutthroats and rainbows so many of the cutts caught here may not be pure strain.

Bonneville Cutthroats are raised at the Daniel Fish Hatchery. These are the cutts that are planted in Sulphur Creek Reservoir that are plentiful in the lake now.
 
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