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Hey guys,

I have been hunting various big game now for 14 years, but always with a rifle. Now I would love to get into hunting with a bow!

Where do I start?

  • Should I go into one of the local archery shops to get set up?
  • Which archery shop to you recommend in Northern Utah?
  • Do I buy new or used?
  • Where could I expect to end up price wise on a new bow set up?
  • Is there a certain time of year that the shops offer better deals?
  • Anything else I should take into consideration?


2022 LE Wasatch Mid Season Bull

Plant People in nature Wood Natural landscape Tree
 

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Nice bull! Congrats!

Get measured for your draw length and then visit every shop you can and shoot as many makes and models as you can. Starting out you don't need to go top shelf right out of the gate.

A bow is just the start. Accessories all add up but you will need a few.

Unless you have some friends that are knowledgeable I would go new to start. Used can be good but you need to know what to check.

If you are in the Ogden area check out the Weber archery range.

 

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Practice, practice, practice. One thing I've been doing with my boys for the last several years are the 3d archery shoots. Total Archery Challenge is a fun one, you'll get a ride to the top of the mountain on a ski lift then walk down the course shooting at 3d foam targets. Its good practice to shoot outside in the mountains in hunting type situations and a lot of fun. There's several different shoots throughout the year, pick one and go.
 

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Looks like you’ve had some great rifle hunts!

For sure, as stated, get measured for your draw length at a shop. Going new, if you go with one of the top end bows/brands, expect to be near $2k between bow, rest, sight, release, stabilizer, quiver, arrows, and broadheads and a target. If you don’t get one of the top end flagship bows, you can be closer to a $1000 package.

There’s absolutely nothing wrong with a used bow. Just get some help to inspect it all, if you’re not sure what red flags to look for. This time of year, as the new release bows come out you can find some really good used bows just a year or two old. (Think closer to 700-900$, sometimes with some accessories included)

Then again, if the money is available, buy once, cry once, and have a sweet set up. I bought several budget bows, looking to upgrade a little at a time. I’ve slowly spent an awful lot of money to slowly upgrade.

One important aspect - be sure to look at success rate differences, and set realistic expectations. Shooting a bow sure is fun, and you can really get hooked fast! Good luck!
 

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I'm no archery expert by any means, but getting your draw length measured is a must. From there I went on eBay and bought a brand new PSE set up from an archery shop out of state. I simply told them the draw length to set it to and the package came shipped with sight, peep, rest and quiver. They set the draw length, weight, and paper tuned. When it arrived I put on a stabilizer and started shooting. Not being an expert, I think the bow shoots great, probably largely because I didn't go around shooting dozens of bows. Ignorance is bliss, ha. Best of all, that bow and package was <$500. Is it the best bow, maybe not, but it flings sharp pointy sticks pretty straight. Getting the right arrows is also key. Many novice/beginners don't know the proper length, spine, etc to getting for shooting with their bow. My two cents isn't worth as much as others', but you can get a good set up for less than you might think. You can get similar setups at similar prices at Sportsman's or Cabela's. I'm sure there will be some on black Friday specials.

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I would go to Humphrey’s archery off state street in Murray I believe. Shoot all the bows you can. You can get a nice set up bow for under 700 or a top of the line bow for well over 2000. It’s all up to you on what you want to spend. Great Wasatch bull by the way.
 

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My first set up was a diamond black ice, used, from scheels. They were happy to help get all the specs set for me, arrow spine and build, etc for right under 500. But it was a pretty out dated bow, and just the cheap basics for accessories. I felt like I’d out grown that pretty quickly. It was a blast, but certainly left me wanting more.
OnceI had help with getting started, KSL had lots of great used options.
 

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Go to Humphrey's Archery or Wilde Arrow. Like others have said you can be anywhere from $900 - $2k+ for bow, release, arrows, target & broadheads. Shoot a variety and range of bows. Pick a shop you feel comfortable with. No question is a bad question. These guys can help you get set up properly and have confidence in your gear.
 

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I shot bow for 30-some years before I ever set foot in a pro shop. Matter of fact, there weren't any local pro shops back then. I bought my arrows from Allied War Surplus and everything else from Consolidated Field Sports (neither is in business anymore). Pro shops provide a great service and I know many archers depend on them. But in my opinion, you should have a basic understanding of archery and at least a rough idea of what you're looking for before you visit.

Another resource that wasn't available "back in the day" was the Net. YouTube has hundreds if not thousands of videos and makes a great place to start learning. Yes, you'll find the quality of information varies in those videos and you'll find a lot of conflicting opinions...just as you'll find if you visit a few different shops.

But before jumping into compound archery, you really owe it to yourself to explore traditional archery. Shooting a recurve or longbow let's you experience (learn) the fundamentals without all the bells and whistles (distractions) of modern compound bows. I think that learning to shoot a trad bow will make you a better archer when/if you pick up a compound. Traditional archery requires a lot more dedication than compound, but your goal in the beginning is just to begin to understand the dynamics of form and arrow flight.

In my opinion, the more independent you can be, the more enjoyment and satisfaction you'll have as an archer. There's so much more to archery than just flinging arrows.
 
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