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I must make two appologies. As I mentioned on another thread, I received a 50 Cal. T/C Omega for Christmas and not coincidentally I have recently enrolled in the dedicated hunter program. Yes, I am one of those who filled up the cap, sorry. I also appologise for asking rather elmentry questions that have probably been hashed over add-neausium but being new to ML they are new to me. Before I go to sight in my new toy, I have to decide on a bullet weight and my research has discovered a very wide variety of styles and weights of bullets from 180 grain sabots to 450 grain conicles. I am having a little difficulty transferring my experience with smaller caliber, higher velocity smokeless rounds to bigger caliber "black powder" velocities. For convience sake (at least to start with) I will probably be using 100 grains of either Pyrodex of Triple 7 powder. I suspect that with a constant fast burning propellant, lighter bullets would = higher velocities and flatter trogectories and ? better accuracy while heavier bullets = better knockdown performance. I am somewhat scepticle that at velocities well under 2000 fps any quality hunting bullet would have problems with over expansion and weight retention ( correct me if I am wrong). So I would like to know what advantages there are to "very heavy" bullets. And I would like some suggestions for bullet weights that would strike a balance between flat trogectory and knockdown performance. Thanks!
 

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I just got a Omega too. I am shooting a 250 grain bullet (TC shockwave sabbot) with 100 grains of triple seven pellets. Your gun should have came with a few of these bullets. I have only shot a little but this set up was very accurate and I don't see any reason to change it. Good luck.
 

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Campfire,

I would try 300 grain bullets if elk are on the agenda. If it is just deer, then a 250 grain bullet will do fine. Frankly, at 100 yards, there won't be much difference in trajectory at all, I just prefer a little extra "punch" or weight to allow more penetration if elk are your prize.

I like the shockwave bullets (or Hornady's version the SST I think). They are very accurate in my Knight and in two friends' TC Omegas. I also really like the Barnes MZ Expander and the Barnes Spitfire. Both have shot extremely accurate in my rifles as well as buddies rifles.

You are on the right track starting with loose powder. 100 grains is what I shoot with my Knight and it shoots really nice with about 5 different Sabot combos. You do NOT need to load more than that. If your rifle shoots more accurately with more powder, then go ahead, but you definitely don't need more powder for improved "killing ability". 100 grains is plenty.

Congratulations on your new rifle. Have a lot of fun and remember to "keep yer powder dry".

There is one excellent read you should take a few moments to go through. It was written by a gentleman who had now passed away, but it is some of the most sound information on getting the most from your muzzleloader I have ever seen. Extremely good advice. His screen name was "Bluelk". If you go to http://www.realtree.com/forums/ubbthreads.phb go to the Muzzleloading forum and look for it. They had listed the thread as the first option for a very long time, although I haven't looked at it for a long time.

Try this: http://www.realtree.com/forums/showthread.php?t=903 click on the red line "Rich Dunkirks (Bluelk) muzzleloading chapters"

Enjoy the read and what he says really does work. I have helped ALOT of people at one of our Wasatch Front gun ranges sight there ML in and his advice works. Most people try to take too many shortcuts in the beginning. Start out by being diligent and extremely consistent.

Firehawk
 

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I have killed two deer in two years and made 4 inch patterns at one hundred yards with open sights. Please try this load, 100 grains of triple 7 pellets and a 245 gr. powerbelt arrow-tip. I love love love powerbelts because they are not plastic jacketed so there is NO plastic residue that can coat the rifling. Try it and let us know how it works and make sure you buy some t-17 saturated patches to run between shots. They are a life saver and will improve youre accuracy. Hope this helps. My deer this year didnt take a step!!
 

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There are two options here. Shooting pistol bullets is a good choice because the bullets are fairly cheap and there are a lot of good ones availalble. I love the Speer gold dots because they are bonded. I would go with 240 grain .44 bullets for deer, or 270s for elk. A lot of people like XTPs but I've had jacket separation on them a few times. You can get them in a 300 gr which would be good for elk. The second option is the actual muzzleloader bullets. They may cost a little more (or a lot more depending on which ones), and give you a little better ballistic coefficient. That translates into more retained velocity. This may be worth it if you plan on really extending the range of your rifle to it's limit, up into the 150 to 250 yard range. Like has been mentioned, somewhere in the 250 gr. range for deer and 300 to 350 would be good for elk.
 

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north slope said:
I just got a Omega too. I am shooting a 250 grain bullet (TC shockwave sabbot) with 100 grains of triple seven pellets. Your gun should have came with a few of these bullets. I have only shot a little but this set up was very accurate and I don't see any reason to change it. Good luck.
If it ain't broke; don't fix it. 8)

I like that 250 grain sabot, heavy enough for knock down power and light enough to shoot flat.

I gotta get out and test "my" new Omega out soon. :D
 

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Weekend_Warrior said:
I love love love powerbelts because they are not plastic jacketed so there is NO plastic residue that can coat the rifling.
Funny I wonder what those green gas checks on the back of them that seal against the rifling are made out of? :wink:

I have used both sabots and Powerbelts and they both foul the rifling. You must clean all muzzleloaders no matter what load you are using for the best accuracy out of them. I run a patch thru the barrel every other shot when sighting in.
 

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Funny I wonder what those green gas checks on the back of them that seal against the rifling are made out of? :wink:
I agree with you but they dont have plastic jackets. I just feel like there is more fouling with more plastic. Gotta keep em clean. You are right...
 
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