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How do all of you see the waxing and waning of popularity of different cartridges?

It seems to me that in the last 50 years or so several cartridges might be gaining popularity in the US (.308, .300 Win Mag, 7mm Rem. Mag, 7mm-08, 6.5xmm, .45-70, etc.) and some might be decreasing in popularity to one degree or another (possibly .30-30, .300 Savage, 303 British, .270, .30-06, etc.). Of course, many of the ones on my proposed list of decreasing popularity were so dominant at one time that they still remain quite popular.

Any thoughts on this?
 

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30-30 is a round that I had no more use for... I sold my lever action gun which was the gun that I shot my first deer with. I concluded that it is just not practical. The rifles are handy and all but I am perfectly fine with packing a scoped rifle.
 

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In Texas the 30-30 is still a staple used to kill a lot of deer, pigs, and coyotes. Barring those with savage 99's, the .300 savage for the most part isn't too frequently chambered. The .270 and 06', I wouldn't say are losing ground. Everyone probably owns at least one or the other already, but it is for that very reason that other less common cartridges are the variety that spices life.

It goes almost without saying that people are looking to buy the fastest, flattest, blood-vessel-rupturingest cartridges on the consensus that it will help them make extra long shots, despite the fact that most animals in the country are taken within 100 yards, much less 200 yards. Or the fact that it is similar to a common military cartridge, and components and ammunition for .223s, among others, are easier to come by. Such a thought may yield understanding as to why there might be a decline in 06's and 303s since their replacement(?) in armed forces.

I remember reading a statistic that only 10% of muzzleloaders are traditionals. I don't remember if it was 10% in the field, or purchases, and I read it on the internet which voids inherent credibility. However, modern inline, highspeed, ultralight muzzleloaders are dominating the market despite the countless years of success within 100 yards with patched round balls and even lead conicals that began appearing the in 1800's. We want our guns, cars, and food fast.
 

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It has nothing to do with the inherent capabilities of the cartridge. And everything to do with marketing. What will any of your "rising star" cartridges do that your dying breed cannot? Nothing. Some might fit in a shorter action, or a particular rifle. But from a ballistic standpoint, there is nothing new, and (with the exception of the UltraMag concept) hasn't been for the last 50 years. The short mags? Remington tried that in the Model 600 back in the '60s. The 6.5mms? Let's see. We can start with the Swede, Carcano, Arisaka, Mauser, and don't forget the "king of the barrel burners" 264 Winchester Magnum. The 7mm Remington Magnum is nothing more than a 270 Winchester that needs to go on a diet. I am not opposed to the variety of cartridges available to the shooting public. It gives us internet experts something to entertain ourselves with.
 

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I have to chuckle every time I hear guys debating over calibers that are in reality so close in performance that they are virtually identical. Bullet drop at 400 hundreds yards of less than a couple inches, velocities at 200 yards of less than 50 fps, energy delivered 1% or 2% difference. Not to say I was any better in my day. I've spent plenty over the years doing the "out with the old" game...and had a ton of fun doing it:)
 

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You also have to look at different areas of the country and just what hunters are buying. In the eastern deer woods there is no need for the fastest and newest out there and the old lever action rifles still reign as kings there.

I think that if you asked the same question on a wildlife forum back in Wisconsin they would ask you how long is the ultra mags going to last? Back there the .30-30, .300 Savage, and other older rounds are still outselling any of the newer rounds.
 

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I have to chuckle every time I hear guys debating over calibers that are in reality so close in performance that they are virtually identical. Bullet drop at 400 hundreds yards of less than a couple inches, velocities at 200 yards of less than 50 fps, energy delivered 1% or 2% difference. Not to say I was any better in my day. I've spent plenty over the years doing the "out with the old" game...and had a ton of fun doing it:)
Bingo, truer words were never spoken. Mrs Goob tells me the exact same thing all the time.

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Cartridges, like cars, don't have to be justified by performance or value. Only by the appetite of the consumer........and man I'm feeling hungry. Time for another compulsory purchase that I can totally afford and don't need that will bring a big smile to my face. I sure like this new 1955 Winchester model 70 custom 257 Roberts Ackley that I just bought. I know Loke, the 25-06 is better and you can buy shells at Wal Mart. Blah blah blah.------SS
 

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Cartridges, like cars, don't have to be justified by performance or value. Only by the appetite of the consumer........and man I'm feeling hungry. Time for another compulsory purchase that I can totally afford and don't need that will bring a big smile to my face. I sure like this new 1955 Winchester model 70 custom 257 Roberts Ackley that I just bought. I know Loke, the 25-06 is better and you can buy shells at Wal Mart. Blah blah blah.------SS
Funny you should say that. I found a 300WSM while bear hunting this spring so I sat on a stump and mentally went though my inventory of guns and realized 'I don't have one of these'. Huh, I think I'll build one! I just need my bolt from PTG and my bumblebee striped Stocky's stock and I'm ready to put it together. I'm actually going to build a gun around a caliber that's already on it's way out.
If you think about it, there's a WIDE range of calibers that are suitable for anything from coyotes to elk. The ones that have been established a long time and/or associated with the military seem to have staying power. And I agree with Loke....marketing.
 

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Cartridges, like cars, don't have to be justified by performance or value. Only by the appetite of the consumer........and man I'm feeling hungry. Time for another compulsory purchase that I can totally afford and don't need that will bring a big smile to my face. I sure like this new 1955 Winchester model 70 custom 257 Roberts Ackley that I just bought. I know Loke, the 25-06 is better and you can buy shells at Wal Mart. Blah blah blah.------SS
Those words you put in my mouth just left a really nasty taste. I've always appreciated the 257 Ackley. It is one of very few "AI" cartridges that actually make sense. I've always wanted one, but it would need to be in the right classic rifle (like a real model 70). The only use I have for the 25-06 is to re-barrel it to 270 and make a useful rifle out of it.
 

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Just flipping some crap back at ya Loke after your 7MM weight loss cartridge comment. I'm a vehement fan of the 284 so I figured I'd bite on your end-around statement......only in jest of course. I love them all, I just prefer the 257 and 284. Both my kids shoot and prefer the 270. Fine by me, they seem to kill stuff just as dead.....hopefully a huge bull later this year. The 270 does look pretty cute standing in the shadow of his big brother though.:)-------SS
 

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Shadow..... You're funny.
I love the pointless arguments of how this caliber with 10 more (or less) grains of bullet weight is better than its near clone.
 

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You also have to look at different areas of the country and just what hunters are buying. In the eastern deer woods there is no need for the fastest and newest out there and the old lever action rifles still reign as kings there.

I think that if you asked the same question on a wildlife forum back in Wisconsin they would ask you how long is the ultra mags going to last? Back there the .30-30, .300 Savage, and other older rounds are still outselling any of the newer rounds.
Yep, and then there's the pumps and semi-autos, all with round-nose bullets.

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Yep, and then there's the pumps and semi-autos, all with round-nose bullets.

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Santa, I'd like a mint condition Winchester 100 in 308 and a Model 88 in 284. Please leave the round nose silver tip bullets in my stocking. Thanks, I'll have Mrs. shooter leave you some cookies.

PS. If you can find those I'll take a Savage 99 in 250-3000. I've been a good boy and I quit calling people bad names on Internet forums.

SS
 

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So you think that Wyogoob is Santa?

Careful. You might end up getting biltong in your stocking.
 
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When I was a boy seems everyone had a 300 Savage or a 30-06. The 06 seems to still be common but I don't know anyone else with a 300 Savage anymore.
 

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When I was a boy seems everyone had a 300 Savage or a 30-06. The 06 seems to still be common but I don't know anyone else with a 300 Savage anymore.
I got a 300 Savage with a Lyman peep sight on it, it is a great gun.
 

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Compared to the rest of the country there's only a handful of hunters in Utah and Wyoming combined. So I'm thinking the 12 gauge (deer slug) is the most popular cartridge out there...........has been, and will be, for a long time.
 

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Its obviously regional because access and game opportunities vary across the country. Certainly some ammo is cheaper because of scale of production cost savings - and that is a good indication that those calibers are popular and not a part-time run.

While handloaders only make up a minority of rifle shooters, and military/defensive-style rifles chambered in military calibers skew the hunting cartridge stats, RCBS does publish a list of their Top 10 selling rifle die calibers - and I found this one from 2012 on the 'net that gives some idea what calibers are popular:

1-.223 Remington
2- .308 Winchester
3- .30-06 Springfield
4- .243 Winchester
5- .270 Winchester
6- .300 Winchester Magnum
7- .22-250 Remington
8- 7mm Remington Magnum
9- .30-30 Winchester
10- .25-06 Remington
 
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