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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just getting started in upland game hunting and I'm already obsessed with chukars, although I haven't seen any yet! I've only been out a few times and I realize that I'm still learning and paying my dues, but I sure would like to bag a couple before the season ends. Last week I went out to the Cedar Mountains and I did run into a single set of tracks which eventually disappeared in the rocks. So I know I was in the right area but I don't have a dog (should have one by next season) so I may have walked right past them. Anyway, I wonder if I didn't go high enough. Is there a certain elevation where chukars like to hang out? Do they migrate up and down on a daily basis? One author says that the snow drives them lower, while another author says when the snow piles up, they go to the upper ridgelines. Which is it? Are there any particular counties or mountain ranges where I might have some luck? I'm not asking for GPS coordinates of your favorite spots, but some clues for success would be great!
 

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I saw about a dozen of them hangin out on the road up to Lost Creek today. If it wasnt on private property and I had my shot gun there would be a couple in the oven right now. :D
 

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I am pretty sure this has been posted before but it doesn't hurt to include it again.

The following site will give you a pretty good idea about Chukar Hunting.

http://www.iron-horse.us/chukar/how_to_ ... ukar.shtml

You can find Chukars most anywhere in the mountains of the west desert and you will find them at various elevations but generally they are close to steep rocky areas that provide them protection from predators (and humans). There is also a guzzler map on the DWR site that will give you a general idea of where birds have been in the past.

A dog is not necessary (I have only had one for 3 years) but having one makes the hunt more interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the help. I went out today for my fourth time and finally got into some birds! I tracked down a covey of about 20 or so but I only dropped one. He was wounded and hiding real good when I finally found him up under a rock. I chased the covey to another ridge but they flushed real soon and I didn't have a shot. A dog would have been great for picking up singles. The next ridge I went to had a ton of tracks, but I think I accidentally got below them and they were gone over the top. I could hear them clucking as they gathered together but I never found them. I had a blast and I've now got quads of steel. Guess I could use some target practice, though.

Now I'm trying to decide what kind of dog to get and the whole time I was hiking, I was wondering if most dogs could even make that hike. Recommendations?
 

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I could hear them clucking as they gathered together but I never found them.
They are not clucking, they are laughing at you because they were running up the hill watching you trying to follow them.

As for a dog, you are going to get a ton of suggestions. Go to http://utahbirddogs.com

They will help you out. I got a Brittany Spanial for my daughter because I wanted a personable dog that wouldn't tear up the house.
 

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chirochris said:
Now I'm trying to decide what kind of dog to get and the whole time I was hiking, I was wondering if most dogs could even make that hike. Recommendations?
Any good sporting dog should be able to keep up on a chukar hunt. The key is conditioning. If you run them much they'll have enough stamina but the usual problem on a hunt like that is their feet get torn up. There are a bunch of ways to deal with this. Fill the dog run with large gravel, run them on pavement, take them hiking, or get some booties for them. Getting their pads conditioned is best, but if there's a lot of cactus or you just can't get it done, the booties will help.

If you want a flushing dog, I'd suggest a lab, golden, or springer. Lab would be good if you hunt ducks as well. If you prefer a pointer (they'd be better for hunting grouse or other stuff in really thick brush) then a german shorthair or some kind of setter would be good. I like a flushing dog for pheasant and chukar but it's all personal preference.
 
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