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In the early days of ECMs, it was common to physically replace the stock chipset in order to get improved performance. These days, most ECMs have flash-based memory that can alter things like fuel/air mixture, shift points, etc. with the use of a programmer like the Superchips model you posted a link to. This is what most people refer to as chipping currently. Most products give you the ability to read diagnostic information and error codes, as well as to select from various performance profiles. Some, like the Edge Juice, mount a controller in the cab that gives you access to all kinds of ECM data like tranny temp, boost from the turbo, engine temp, speed (compensated for tire size), EGT, and just about any measurement that is available to the computer. These also allow you to modify your performance setting on the fly at the push of a button.

I've used Hypertech's programmer, which is very similar to the module you posted a link to, and was very happy with it on a Duramax diesel. I have also used the Edge Juice on a Cummins, and overall I prefer the Edge for the data display and on-the-fly profile changes.

I haven't used any of them on gasoline engines, but these will put a HUGE smile on your face with diesels, especially the pre-2007 variety without DPF systems.
 

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A little word of advise for some of your thinking about installing a enhancing devise to the vehicle, If you still have a warranty I would wait till it has expired, if the dealer suspects that a programmer has been installed on the vehicle they can/or will void the warranty and then you will be stuck with the repair bill.
 

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sagebrush said:
... if the dealer suspects that a programmer has been installed on the vehicle they can/or will void the warranty and then you will be stuck with the repair bill.
This seems to have a basis in fact, although it is illegal and prohibited by federal law. Those who know the law and their rights usually don't have problems. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act is a regulation that expressly prohibits the voiding of manufacturer's warranties based on the installation and use of after-market parts. This regulation says that if the after-market part expressly CAUSED the failure of an OEM component, only then can a warranty claim be denied, on a case-by-case basis. Blanket voiding of OEM warranties based on the use of a chip is illegal.

If anyone is dealing with a dealer's attempt to violate this regulation, the following link his very helpful about methods you can use to seek resolution:

http://www.sema.org/main/semaorghome.aspx?ID=50096

It is certainly true that the use of a chip, bigger tires, wheels of non-OEM size, lifts of all kinds, after-market exhaust, and almost any other modification you can think of can cause you warranty-related headaches. If a dealer gives you unjustified problems with this type of thing, first and foremost I would recommend never giving them any more service or vehicle purchase business. Beyond that, the consumer can create just as big a headache for the dealership via the Department of Consumer Protection, Better Business Bureau, and OEM manufacturer representatives.
 
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