Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 20 of 138 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So has the last 13 months or so turn anyone into a Prepper? I already had one foot in the door under the guise of "Disaster prepardness" with about 4 weeks of food and water in case of a natural disaster.

Today my basement looks more like a freaking bunker, and my home office looks like a freaking TOC.

I have to laugh at myself. Never thought id see the day when I'd turn into a prepper.

Someone once mentioned making a prepper thread. I'm bored, so here's my attempt at starting one. Discuss, or laugh, either way, I get it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,840 Posts
I don't think being prepared is crazy at all. I do think that the word "prepper" carries a different connotation with it, however. And it generally is not a positive one.

The last year has reminded me of encouragement I've received my entire life to be better prepared in case of an emergency or other life circumstance that requires having supplies on hand. I think I'm about 10% better off today than I was at this time last year. I have not done a ton, but have made some progress in little ways. I don't feel like I'm anywhere near where I would like to be or should be, but I'm getting closer to where I can be. (if that makes sense)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,051 Posts
Yea we've talked about starting a thread, its a good idea. I've been in that mindset for 5 or so years now. First step is to define just what you are preparing for, then make a plan to cover that. When you feel good about that step, branch out into areas that cover different situations and needs.

I guess I could post the prep list we have of items... I've emailed it to quite a few people over the past 8 months. So the interest of preparedness is definitely increasing among folk.

I've said it a few times in the past here, I'll say it again. Many years ago I had a conversation with the wife about the most realistic, worst case scenario we could prepare for. The best "most likely" event I came up with is a moderate to major earthquake here during a heavy winter. Heavy snow would make it hard to make utility repairs. Power could be out for 4-6 months. Water and Natural gas lines might be ruptured as well and be unavailable for supply for 4-6 months.

Setting that as bench mark, we planned towards that. Perishable foods in the fridge / freezer are simple, just put bottles of water outside to freeze or cool, place in fridge / freezer. But how could we heat the house? How would we get power?

Its easier to prep when items have dual use. A good example is a Big Buddy Heater, we use one ice fishing and its worked great without a hiccup... but in the event of a disaster, it can be used to heat the house as its indoor safe. It needs fuel however. 4 or so years ago I started watching KSL and bought a couple 100lb Propane Bottles. They were surprisingly cheap. Propane never goes bad so its a perfect fuel source for prepping. We also have 4-5 more bottles from barbeques, trailer etc for another 100lbs. I made sure to buy appropriate fittings and adaptors so that in the case of emergency, I can hook just about anything to any bottle. I can run a copper pressure line into the house to run the buddy through the dryer vent. I figure we can run it nonstop for nearly 2 months, and double that if we run it on for 30 min, off for 30.

Electricity can easily come from a portable generator, again used for both camping and emergency's. Fuel is a issue... I generally kept about 20 gal of "blue" gasoline around for whatever, this past winter I filled up the trailers fuel station with an additional 35gal. It wont go bad before we can burn it in the spring. Alternatively, generators can get Propane adapter kits to run off propane, but be aware they dont make as much power as off of gasoline.

Make a plan of what electronics need to be powered and what can be skipped. We'll run critical things internally off extension cords rather than try and power the entire house circuits. A Solar panel just doesnt have the power density yet to really do much more than trickle charge up a battery to run some 12v stuff or charge some usb ports. If you had ALOT of panels things change, but they cost about $1 a watt for a panel. Storage of alot of panels is problematic, how would you set them up, what wiring will you need to get the power to the charge controller? What battery bank will you use? An inverter would run a battery bank dry very quickly unless you had alot of batteries totaling 200-500ah of reserve.

So that kind of covers our heat and power plan... for our family at least. :) Most things we use year around, so its easier to justify the cost, and also we know they will work if an emergency does happen (ie: Generators)

I do NOT have a bunker in the back yard... nor any plans to make one. But I feel in more than a few ways we're a couple steps beyond the normal prepper. We have a store of antibiotics and some other misc emergency medications. Suture kits, steri-strips, numbing agents, splints, military bandages etc etc. Lots of useful stuff can be had off ebay for cheap (lots of good items come out of Israel of all places that you can't just buy in stores in the USA) .

I'll probably add some stuff later. Maybe post a list of our stuff or something.

-DallanC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't think being prepared is crazy at all. I do think that the word "prepper" carries a different connotation with it, however. And it generally is not a positive one.
I think it's all about perspective. Being prepared for a natural disaster like a hurricane isn't crazy. Society though has assigned a negative connotation to the name mainly because of shows like "Doomsday preppers"; where the got the most batscat crazy people on the show, talking about all kinds of crazy things.

That said, given the events over the last year or so, I don't think people think it's as crazy or looked down upon anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,840 Posts
I think one can be prepared for a doomsday scenario without being a "doomsday prepper." There is a difference in the mentality that I think distinguishes the two, and continues to make the "doomsday prepper" appear batscat crazy, as you put it.

Dallan is a guy I respect the heck out of for his ingenuity and I am always fascinated ready the stuff he does. I have been very appreciative of him sharing some ideas with me and we are slowly building supplies. My #1 issue is simply ability to reasonably store the things I want to do. I think you can get meaningfully prepared and set up without taking out a second mortgage to pay for it all, but for me, where I put it is a logistical issue I don't have an answer for.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,008 Posts
What ever happened to the old LDS philosophy of having 2 years worth of food in the home?

As more and more kids grow up and don't want to do the prep work to have that sitting around the time frame has come down. What is it now that they recommend, 6 months?

It is a lot like when Y2K hit. I worked with a person who said that he planned on taking his work truck home at that time because it had a generator on it and he said that he would use that generator to run his refrigerator. Now this was in Colorado in a location that is 7,000' elevation at the end of December. I told him that running his refrigerator would be the last thing that he should be worrying about. He just gave me a dumb look as that statement sunk into his head.

I had a aunt who went crazy with her one daughter. When she passed away we must of hauled out close to a ton of wheat grain that was plumb full of bugs. She had no way to grind it and I asked her daughter what she planned on doing with it. But then she had some grain that could be turned into flour and get some protein from the bugs that were in it.

It is always good to be prepared with dried food and things that don't require refrigeration. But your need to cycle it along with checking it to see if it is spoiled or if there is a problem with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yea we've talked about starting a thread, its a good idea. I've been in that mindset for 5 or so years now. First step is to define just what you are preparing for, then make a plan to cover that. When you feel good about that step, branch out into areas that cover different situations and needs.
.....
I've been working/focusing on so many things I'm not even sure where to start.

This is a good book, i'm sure you already have it:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008536NOQ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I've started reading this:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/9870563457/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thus far it has been interesting, and enlightening, as it contradicts some popular trains of thought with first hand experience.

Obviously economic collapse is one item on my "Why I'm prepping" list. I'm a simple man, I don't understand everything in the finance world, but I do know that the debt clock is ticking and the deficit will double within the next 5 years, and something to the tune of 60% of the fiat (M1?) currency in circulation was printed within the last year, if not more. That can't be a good combination.

Currently I've been doing a round robin on the overused "beans, bullets, bandages". We've acutally sunk a lot of money in all three. One of the smartest things we did with the first stimulus check was to buy a harvest right freeze dryer with it. It's been running most of the time, and I need to buy another shelving unit to store boxes of freeze dried food. I find that freeze dried food has a very nice shelf life, tastes about as good as the day it was cooked, but is bulky.

My wife mentioned 100 gallon propane tanks, however the trouble is having a place to store them. A modest 1 story rambler on .14 acre isn't much to work with space wise, but its way better then all these new high density housing units that are now being built with no yards to speak of.

Wintertime power outage is a concern, mainly because no juice means no blower in the furnace. We've got a little buddy heater, and a plan to shelter up in the master bedroom in the case of a prolonged power outage. I know for a fact that room has extra instillation in the walls (including interior walls) because I put it there myself when our house was still under construction about 9 years ago. :mrgreen:

A wood burning stove is on the list. My wife wasn't keen to it because of the "ugly" chimney pipe, but now she doesn't care anymore. (I finally win! ) It's just a matter of having the money at this point.

As electronics go, the only thing we're concerned about is phones and ham radios. Have a Jackery for that, and our trailers generator.

Of the many things i could mention, I'll toss out this. This is actually a good idea, and OnX makes some aspects of it easier.

Which reminds me I need to find the radio frequencies of my local PD, Trunked system or not, I need to add it it to the folder i've got going.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
11,008 Posts
On the radio frequencies of your local PD, highway patrol, and others you need to watch what they have. Local areas are starting to scramble their transmissions because of problems that they have had with lookyloos and others showing up at crime and accident scenes.

For your propane tank get one and hook it up to your back yard BBQ, then when it gets used up have it refilled. But check on the rules and regulations if you are in a HOA area on what you can have as far as size of tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
I like that distinction between a doomsday prepper and simply being wisely prepared for whatever situation comes. Like Vanilla, I'm not anywhere near where I need to be to feel comfortable with whatever may come, but I'm certainly better off now than I was a year ago. And, more importantly, I'm more aware when I see things I need to adjust one way or the other to get to that place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Heh, yeah...



That's one item that book I linked to earlier. He said that people in the country got hit hard. The usual thought is to bug out to some mountain cabin or remote property. As it turned out in Argentina that worked against people, as they were far from any help, and the perpetrators had all the time in the world to torture and rape their victims.


Best bet is to form a neighborhood watch and keep people like Taxidermist out. :mrgreen:
I've already planted that seed in my neighborhood.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,229 Posts
As an ex scout master, I had a very clear slogan that I recited to my boys almost hourly:

“Don’t do weird stuff”

What does this have to do with prepping? Nothing. I just wanted you to think about the motto “Be Prepared”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,221 Posts
Pandemic leading to empty shelves at the grocery store, an earthquake and a wind storm that took out our local power grid for a week - I've definitely been paying attention to preparedness.

  • We didn't buy an RV for an emergency, but it sure provides some peace of mind. It's always stocked but now we gas up when we get home instead of when we leave. Generator came in real handy this year.
  • Bought a couple of 25 gal water barrels to stash in the shed.
  • Bought flour, rice, salt and sugar in bulk. We already had a loaded pantry so we're good for groceries for 6 weeks or so.
  • Arranged multiple meet-up sites for the family. Our kids are grown and living on the Wasatch Front.
  • Bought a fire proof lock box for important documents. Added all our passwords and detailed instructions to the kids about where our money is and how to get to it. "Take 4 steps due north of the spruce tree, dig 2 feet deep to find a mason jar." ;)
  • Assembled a medical kit (1st aid kit on steroids).
Currently working on beefing up our communications capability in the RV.

That's about it - long ways from the "prepper" category, but not oblivious, either.
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
151 Posts
I wouldnt mind someone sharing a list of items they have included in first aid kits.

Luckily my wife and I have been on the same mind set since marriage, and have slowly built "preps". A few things we have:

-Enclosed trailer, that is always ready to go, and many of our prep items are stored in it.
-50gal drums with water in them, with silver in them to prevent bacteria and algae.
-We bought some radios off amazon that we tested, and work from AF to Woodland Hills. Keep in both our vehicles, and at the house.
-Also bought BaoFeng radios, that can be used as ham radio, and police scaner.
-20gal of propane for Buddy heater, and a few other items.
-25gal of fuel I rotate through to keep fresh.
-Keep vehicles above half tank
-Over 4 months of food, and its food we actually like, and eat.
-Plan in place with family, and neighbors for support, and to check in on one another if anything happens, ie earth quake or any disaster.
-Family member is medically trained
-We keep a safe stocked with ammo and rifles mainly for hunting, but supplied for any other purpose
-Also keep trailer fuel of propane, and fuel.
-72hr kits in each vehicle, as well as cold weather clothing.

Just an example of a few things we have prepared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Best bet is to form a neighborhood watch and keep people like Taxidermist out. :mrgreen:
I've already planted that seed in my neighborhood.

For Rude!! :cry:
Well what kind of reaction do you expect when you imply your plan is to run a mafia like racket and extort people for protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
I see the majority of the comments on preparedness is stuffing away food, ammo, water, etc. But what about fuel for the vehicles? Gas/Diesel Fuel doesn't have a long shelf life, but with a little stabilizer one can keep it around for at least a year.


I worried the new D party would reverse most, if not all the previous administration put into place. That being said, I have a couple fuel tanks I have filled at the lower cost ($1.85 gal. for diesel) months ago. I'll use that when prices reach $4.00 gal. and top it off when needed. Remember the gas wars in the 80's ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,502 Posts
I've done a few of the recommend actions in this thread:

A. Moved out of the HOA. Bought 10 acres. :)
B. I'm on my own well. this is a +. This is also a -.
C. Had a bidet installed in the master bathroom. :mrgreen:
D. 500gallon propane tank. Problem is that it needs to be refilled about every 3 weeks.
E. 50gallon drum full of water. It smells like a dead skunk. I guess I shouldn't drown the little basterds if I don't want it to stink like them.
F. I have a couple generators, "blue" fuel, and a couple propane heaters.
G. Seasoning / food. I have 10 acres of sagebrush. So, in the event of a major food issue: instead of tossing the drowned skunks, I'll season them with sage and cook them for dinner. :noidea:
 
1 - 20 of 138 Posts
Top