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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am looking to get some new floating line but dont know what type to get. i have always used dt but hear good things about the wf. i am just wondering what the differences are and the pros and cons of each or which is better.

i know little about line styles except the shape so any help would be appreciated.

thanks
 

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Here is my take. I have always preferred WF. Smaller diameter, shoots through the smaller guides on my rods. Plus I can shoot the whole lone with little effort. Plus I fish stillwater and big rivers a lot.
All the magazines lately are in favor of DT. It is the 30' as compared to the 15' before the weight thing. Plus the reversible feature, and I will say, because of the 15' weight thing, they DO roll cast easier, specially with glass or boo.
I felt I had to muscle DT more but lately (since the selective trout line) I am changing my feelings on it.
WF might be easier to cast long distances, but I think DT is more accurate.

Just my take on it.
 

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Double taper is generally for shorter, more accurate, soft touch casting. If you fish small dries in places that require a delicate presentation and short to medium length casts then DT is for you. Normally you would couple it with a slow or medium action light rod.

WF lines carry more energy out at the tip and load the rod better. This makes for improved distance, better wind cutting ability, and ease of throwing larger lint. The downside is that you sacrifice a little control, and it's easier to slap the fly down too hard if you are fishing small dries.

Either one can play in the world of the other with practice, but those are essentially the trade offs.
 

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chuckmiester said:
i am looking to get some new floating line but dont know what type to get. i have always used dt but hear good things about the wf. i am just wondering what the differences are and the pros and cons of each or which is better.

i know little about line styles except the shape so any help would be appreciated.

thanks
Chuckmiester,
Its a personal choice. I can tell you why I prefer DT for floating line. It simply makes all of the casts and mends I use in fishing moving water and its reversible so its 2 lines instead of one. I usually keep a fairly fixed length of line so I don't care whether its more shootable, slick, lubed, sharkskin or whatever.

To me, a WF line makes more sense if you are fishing flies on a retrieve. I would want a line to shoot well so I can keep getting the line back out quickly, at any distance I need for the next retrieve. In other words, sinking lines for streamers and stillwater fishing. Another good application of a WF line could be upstream dries because you might have to pick up a lot of line as it comes down at you, then get it back out if you don't get a take. Just my own thoughts , but there are so many WF lines with specialized heads and tapers its hard to generalize too much.

As far as what line is more delicate or what line can turn over big flies better, look at the front taper of the line (whether it is WF or DT). A longer front taper is more delicate but less powerful.

Tyson
 

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I have always used DTF line. Last summer I tried to find a DT line and no one had any. I was told they had lost popularity, so they didn't stock them any more.
 

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I teach basic fly fishing classed and all of my students prefer WF over DT.
I let them cast with both and they always cast better and longer with WF lines.
DT is good for short delicate casts, but you can use a WF and be almost as soft, when you know what you are doing.
Rods also effect your casting, so it's hard to do the apples to apples thing on this.
As James said, DT isn't used a lot anymore, but you can still get it at any good sporting goods store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks for the replies guys. i think i will probably stick with dt because i mostly fish streams, small lakes, or from a toon and distance really doesn't matter much to me.
 

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For me, I fish DT on anything 5 wt and under, and wf on anything 6 wt and over. For our trout streams around here we are not casting long distances into the wind, throwing giant wind-resistant flies, or trying to shoot line as quick as possible so a weight forward line really isn't necessary unless you are stricktly nymphing with very heavy rigs.

Double taper lines land softer, roll cast better, have less memory, and can be flipped around when one end is worn out. What is not to like? Tune up on you casting stroke a bit and it is every bit as easy to cast as a weight forward.

If you must get a wf line but want advantages of a double taper, then get a line with a long front belly such as the S.A. Expert Distance or the Rio Windcutter. Both of these lines cast line a double taper inside 35 - 40 feet. Also, the Rio Selective Trout DT has a mini wf head at each end, giving a nice balance between wf and DT, and can still be flipped around when one end is worn out.
 

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I've always fished DT floating line. It sounds like WF line is easier for beginners to cast because of the taper. Since I've never casted one I cannot really say. Maybe the WF is used in those long distance casting contests?
 

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The Rio Wincutter (now the windcutter II) is a great, underrated line. In close it cast like a DT and when you get more line out it it shoots well, more like an aggressive wf.

It has a compund taper design. The front half of the taper is one weight lighter than specified and the rear taper is one weight heavier than the specified line weight.
 
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One nice advantage of DT that hasn't been mentioned yet is that it lasts longer than WF because when one end gets worn you can just reverse it and use the other end effectively doubling the lifespan of your line. With the cost of high quality line being in $50 range and up that is a big benefit for cheapskates like me.
 

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Is there anything special about the end of the fly line, or can you cut chuncks off the end and have it still work fine? Sometime when my line starts sinking I just cut a few feet off and then is seems to work fine again for awhile. I like the idea of taking it completely off and using the other side.
 

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Guns and Flies said:
Is there anything special about the end of the fly line, or can you cut chuncks off the end and have it still work fine? Sometime when my line starts sinking I just cut a few feet off and then is seems to work fine again for awhile. I like the idea of taking it completely off and using the other side.
I would imagine that a WF would be affected more by doing that than a DT line. Also the ends of the fly line seems to be the first place my line starts to crack. Removing a bit of the tip section can remove some cracks that have started to form and not let water in it, hence it floats better again.
 

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WeakenedWarrior said:
One nice advantage of DT that hasn't been mentioned yet is that it lasts longer than WF because when one end gets worn you can just reverse it and use the other end effectively doubling the lifespan of your line. With the cost of high quality line being in $50 range and up that is a big benefit for cheapskates like me.
No big deal but reread the posts. I found three previous posts where this was mentioned.
 

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Guns and Flies said:
Is there anything special about the end of the fly line, or can you cut chuncks off the end and have it still work fine? Sometime when my line starts sinking I just cut a few feet off and then is seems to work fine again for awhile.
Guns and Flies,
I used to do this as well. Turns out, whenever you mess with the front taper or the diameter of the tip, the performance is altered. The thicker the diameter of the tip of the fly line, and the shorter the front taper, the harder it is to make a soft landing on the cast.

Tyson
 

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flyguy7 said:
Double taper lines land softer, roll cast better, have less memory, and can be flipped around when one end is worn out.
I don't buy that a DT has less memory than a WF. They're made with the same material. Can you explain?
 

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Dt lines have a thicker diameter throughout. all things being equal, the line with the thinner diameter will have more memory.
 

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I still don't agree. Fly lines are made with a core that is level through the lenght of the line. It's the coating that is tapered, and the coating is made of PVC, which has a tendency to "set" or coil. So, if the DT has a thicker overall coating, it has more of the material that is prone to storing memory.

In my opinion, there is no difference between WF & DT as far as memory is concerned. But I guess that is opinion as much as thinking a DT is easier or harder to cast than a WF.
 
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