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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I just found out I drew Wyoming Antelope. I have been building points for a long time now and finally pulled the trigger on a tag. I kind of lied in the thread title, I have had a couple doe tags. This will be my first buck tag though. We will be hunting unit 95. I am super excited for this hunt. It isn't considered a blue chip unit, but it should hold some good bucks.

Being my first buck hunt and waiting 10 year to draw I want to make the most of it. I am not looking for spots, (unless someone has experience up there). I would like advise on Antelope hunting in general though. So any tips or advise is very welcome. Thanks, guys!
 

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Yes--Wyoming posted this morning. I drew a doe antelope tag wahoo!

I think this advice would go for any antelope unit in any state--drive around a bunch and glass glass glass. 95 is a lot of checker board and public--should be real easy to find accessible goats. The more time ya spend looking around the higher chance of getting a good one. Out of all the north American ungulates, antelope is probably the easiest to hunt. Drive, Drive, Glass, Glass. congrats on your tag!
 

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My advice is don't shoot at the first 20 bucks you see. It is often hard to tell a good goat from an average. Take the time to evaluate several before choosing one. For length, you want the horns to be 2x as tall as the ears. For width, you want the bases to be 1.5-2x the width of the eyes. Find a tall goat with mass and then evaluate the prongs. If the goat is tall and has good mass and looks like it has good prongs, you have a shooter. The smaller goats will look like they have great prongs but it is usually because they lack length or mass. My favorite optics for pronghorn is a good pair of 15x56 binoculars. Put them on a tripod and you will locate bucks you will miss with a regular pair of 8x or 10x binos. Onx is essential for you hunt as you are required to know private from public in WY. Onx will open a lot of areas you will miss without it. You need to shoot at 500 yards several times before you go. Many times you will get a goat inside of 300, but it is so open there, often you will end up taking 500 yard shots. Know what your ballistics are at 500 and practice at that range in ways you will be shooting in the field. Wy requires you to be 30' from a road, so technically, no shooting off the hood of a truck. Practice with a shooting stick as it is rare to get a prone shot due to the sage brush. Finally, don't shoot your buck within 200 yards of a private boundary. Those things will often run a bit before going down and you don't want to have to deal with F&G if your buck runs on private.
 

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I think Pronghorn Antelope are the hardest of all species in NA to try and judge. I've gotten it so very very wrong so much we dont even try anymore.

My wifes first pronghorn, we found a nice symmetrical buck tried to judge the length by using the ears, eyes, black face showing it was an older buck ... blah blah blah. She thought it looked nice and shot it. When we got up to it, it had 5" ears! It was well under what I thought it was, she was so happy though I had it mounted for her as at that point, we didnt know if we'd ever get tags to hunt antelope again.

Fast forward to my wifes last Pronghorn, we had a buck less than 100 yards from the truck standing looking at us. I thought he was a good solid buck. My wife wasnt sure, she hemmed and hawed ... for 5 minutes looking at this thing. Finally she decided she need to look at it through her scope (lol wtf?). Apparently crosshairs make it look different or something... IDK. Anywho the buck decided 5 minutes was enough and ran down pulling up 250 yards away and stood broadside again. I was looking through the spotter when the gun went off... startled me. The buck ran out of sight around a hill. We continued down the road a short bit, to see the other side of the hill and look for sign of him. There was a old 2 track road going right down to where we last saw him. We drove down and wala, he was like 10 yards from it piled up.

That buck had the biggest head I've ever seen on a pronghorn. He had really nice horns, but the size of his head made him look more on the average side of things. He was my wifes largest by a huge margin... and she very nearly passed on it.

Do what MulieManiac said... shoot something you really like, take it home and never measure it! Be happy forever.

-DallanC
 

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Congrats Raptorman! I have struck out on both bucks and does for 3 years now. WY odds are not what they used to be. Just another thing that COVID ruined…well, it put a final nail in the coffin anyway.

Antelope are my favorite animal to hunt. You can make it what you want. If you want a short hunt with an average animal, you’ll literally be done by 10am on the first morning. If you want more of a hunt, do what others have said and sift thru LOTS of animals before shooting one. That’s one of the beauties of antelope hunting - you will see animals, ALOT of animals. and it won’t be like hunting deer or elk. Much easier and forgiving IMO.

It wouldn’t hurt to make at least one scouting trip out to the unit in early Sept. If you spend a day driving and glassing from the road, you’ll have a very good idea of what to expect when the hunt opens. You can gauge what your standards should be for the hunt from there. Once you know the caliber of bucks in the unit, as has been said shoot one that makes you happy - be it an hour into the hunt or on the 3rd day.
 

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Take a good spotter with you. I shot one on this unit 95 in 2015 maybe 74" big body. This was just north east of Lone Tree and North of the Henry's Fork River. I t
Cloud Plant community Sky Horn Plant

Sky Deer hunting Ecoregion Carnivore Mammal

Thought he was his bigger brother in the group. Be picky and scrutinize well before taking the shot. Still overall the biggest Goat I have shot to date. During the rut the dominant mails will be with their does. Check the antlers on these carefully. They get to be the dominant mail by fighting which can screw up their antlers. Seen broken prongs and such. 2019 I shot a buck on Parker Mountain (Utah) during muzzle loader season that got his ass kicked. He had some nice shaped antlers but the left prong was gone from fighting. The nicest buck set of antlers may not be the dominant male. And more does equal more eyes spotting trouble. Males get territorial during the rut and will stay in the general area and circle back around to the same spot after a while if spooked off. They have excellent eye sight. They are always easier to sneak up on while eating as their eyes are closed doing this. But they always have one in the group looking for trouble. If the hair one one goats butt stands up on end this is a warning to the other goats, you have been busted and any second they hit the after burners and are headed out of Dodge. Never skyline yourself always approach around the side of a hill or on your hands and knees below sage brush level. You look human the are gone. Get knee pads and glove for crawling there is prickly pear cactus everywhere. Have a good scope designed for shooting long range with a high magnification 12x plus. It gets harder to tell the sex the further out they are. They are not hard to hunt. Finding one you want to shoot is the biggest challenge. And as stated practicing out to 500 yards is a good idea as previously stated. I have shot pronghorn no closer than 180 (muzzle loader) yards all the way out to 660 (6.5-284) yards both bucks and does. Most between 300-400 yards. They are hearty due to the environment they live in but not tough animals usually go down easy. You don't need an uber powerful magnum to shoot them with. Sometimes curiosity gets the best of them. I was in the brush over looking a guzzler and had the 2019 buck actually challenging me. Chirping at me. He knew I was in the brush but did not know what I was as I was not standing. Could not get the shot, so I started crawling towards him with no brush hiding me. He got closer the more I crawled. When I got up off my hands to range him he would back off and disappear over the hill for a few seconds then come back. I looked more human when not on all 4's (muzzle loader hunt was camo'ed up). Guess this was natural selection as this was one dumb goat. All the others saw me or my Tacoma just left the mountain running full tilt. The more I crawled towards him, the more he came to me. Eventually I got him in range and now he is on a skull hooker in the den. Wyoming goats are much bigger bodied than Utah goats. Notice top vs bottom.
 

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I've only shot one buck antelope my whole life (in Unit 98 up the road from you). I'm assuming your hunt is in September? If so, the rut is on and the antelope are easy to spot. We didn't have much pressure and two of us tagged out on one Saturday and the third tagged out the next Saturday. I think they are possibly the most beautiful animal in North America. Their coloration is so striking and unique. They also taste delicious, in spite of what some may say.

Glass a lot. Get within shooting range on foot, get a steady rest for your shot. Also, have a white handkerchief, t shirt, or flag ready. You can "call them in" by waving it around, use it to stop them for a shot, etc... I missed mine on the first shot and my friend waved a white cloth around, which kept the antelope staring at him and gave me a second shot.
 

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Also Gut it and Skin it at the same time. Get the hide off and get it cooled down as quickly as possible. It is better than elk if you do this. Never had a bad tasting goat and , I have shot 7 over the years.
20'ish In our family... not a bad one. Get'em on ice ASAP. Those cheap Igloo 150 quart coolers easily hold 2 antelope and lots of ice.

-DallanC
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I agree with this 100%. We had doe tags about 9 years ago here in Utah. Most of what we heard was the meat was not very good. But also it can be okay if you get it cool really fast and skinned. So we did that. Put it right on ice, very quickly and then took it home and processed it. We only kept the back straps and made the rest jerky. Those back straps were some of the best meat I have ever had. We were ticked that we didn't keep more for steaks or roasts.
 
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