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With the application period underway, and people dreaming of the adventures that will unfold for some this fall - I have a scenario question...

Let's suppose Hunter A shoots at and hits an animal, the animal takes off, and Hunter B shoots the same animal killing it. Who tags the animal in your opinion?

I believe both Hunter A and Hunter B could justify tagging the animal instead of the other under certain circumstances. If Hunter A's shot was in the vitals and the animal would have expired without the shot from Hunter B, I believe it's Hunter A's animal. If Hunter A's shot was not in the vitals, I believe it's Hunter B's animal. The problem is, this scenario is very subjective and would be very hard to come to an agreement in the field.
 

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It's all about shot placement from hunter A and what condition the animal is in when it makes it to hunter B and how far apart they are.
If that animal travels a fair distance and you are hunter A come to the realization you did not put a very good shot on the animal.

If you are hunter B and the animal doesn't travel very far from hunter A come to the realization hunter A beat you to the punch and either worked a little harder then you or was luckier then you.

I have seen this scenerio get real ugly on some open bull hunts in utah .sometimes when a confused elk has committed suicide and ran into areas with hunters in Camp. areas where hunters ABCDE where all there. It got ugly

Remember there are strange and dis honest people even in the hunting community never get into a heated situation.. if you feel there's a good chance somebody is wrongfully trying to tag your animal. Take pictures where it all went down at and call the dwr.

No animal is worth something stupid happening and who knows maybe the guy who is wanting to fight hand over fist for a animal that was most likely was not his. Had been drinking or has a warrant dwr is usually pretty good at diffusing those situations
 

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So many more factors to consider to decide that one. Are hunters A and B hunting together? If so, it might change things. If they are not together, how much time between shots? How far did animal travel? Talking about shot placement might become tricky.

Basically, it comes down to not being a jerk. You might have shot an animal first, but under the circumstances hunter B deserves to tag it as he killed it. Don't be a jerk about it. You might be hunter B and have actually 'killed' the animal that hunter A deserves to tag. Don't be a jerk about it.

I could see something like this happening when multiple hunters are targeting the same animal. I know how much joy comes from hard work coming together. I also know how much frustration comes when hard work doesn't pan out. But I tend to believe that the answer to this in each situation will be clear if people just aren't jerks.
 

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My opinion is that the person who puts the final shot in an animal should be required to tag it. I shot the biggest mule deer of my life in a nasty part of an Idaho wilderness. The deer was on a rockslide and fell at the shot. I was watching the deer to make sure it was down for good as it thrashed a bit . At one point it's head came up and another Hunter from below me shot it in the head from about 50 yards with a 300 mag.

When I got to the deer the head was destroyed and one antler was severed at the base. The other Hunter came over and stated that he finished him off for me. I promptly told him that he now had a deer to tag and he refused. I was really mad and considered an old fashioned beat down of the guy but thankfully found some constraint.

I then spent the rest of the day cutting up and packing the deer out of the wilderness lamenting the loss of the expensive non resident tag that had cost me a weeks wages at that time.

I'm not sure what the law is/was but in my opinion, the last bullet wins the prize.------SS
 

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You answered it yourself. Hunter A never "killed it". If its alive and on its feet its fair and legal game for anyone else........................

-DallanC
I agree and whether you like it or not that's the way it is.

I try my best to get as close as I can to the animal and then shoot it in the base of the neck.

I've lost 2 wounded mule deer to other hunters:
1) A heavy 5x5 that I shot in the nut sack and belly at close range as it was running away up a steep hillside. A guy from Utah sitting in his pickup drinking coffee finished it off. I helped the man gut the beautiful buck, congratulated him and walked away.

2) At about 300 yards out in the sagebrush I double-lunged a nice 4x4 I had been chasing around during the archery hunt. The dead-on-his-feet deer ran off into a quakie patch and was shot by a guy who seen it while he was driving down a two-track road. There were pieces of lung hanging on the sagebrush where I hit the deer. By the time I got to the hunter with "my" deer he had started to gut it. He hadn't cut his tag though. I wasn't very happy, mad at myself for not knocking the deer down as much I was angry at that guy for trying to claim "my" deer. We exchanged some "pleasantries" and decided to flip a coin for the buck. I lost the coin toss and then helped the guy drag the deer to his truck and load it up. I shook his hand and moved on.
 

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I'm sure you are referring to big game animals, but this scenario happens all the time with ducks and geese too. We have pounded geese and some of them are definitely hurt, but make it out of our spread over to other hunters spread where they cleanly kill them. There is no question in my mind who's birds they are. The guy that finishes them off is the winner. I feel the same way about a deer or elk that is hit and runs off to be shot by another hunter.
 

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If I ever found myself in this situation with another hunter and the other hunter really wanted it I think I would readily cede the animal to the other hunter. The only exception would be if the animal was an exceptional trophy and I was hunter "A" in this scenario and I knew that I made a fatal shot that would have resulted in a dead animal sooner rather than later. The odds of me making that good of a shot and having another hunter put a bullet/broadhead in the animal before it expires are extremely low, so I don't think I will ever have to worry about it.
 

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Basically, it comes down to not being a jerk.
Amen! If I see someone shoot a nice buck and I can tell they hit it good, it shouldn't matter if it walks right in front of you, it was gonna die in the next minute or so anyways. If it was a terrible shot and you can barely tell it is wounded, then have at it and see if you can do better. Common sense really should solve all of these problems... but usually egos get in the way.
 

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don't do anyone any favors unless they ask you to. Otherwise you better be ready to put your tag on that animal. If you hear a shot and see a badly wounded animal go by you, do the right thing and go tell the hunters where you saw it and let them continue their tracking job.
 

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Had this exact scenario play out last year during the deer hunt. I was Hunter A. Hunter B killed the animal. Hunter B shot it (unbeknownst to me) as they were afraid it was going to soon be out of my eyesight due to terrain. Hunter B conceded the deer to me though...basically, was a class act...i.e. not a jerk. It all comes down to some simple curteousy and repsect for others in the field. I hope a can do the same for someone else in the future.
 

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Round these parts in Oregon, Hunter B shoots that animal and its dead your going to walk up to them gutting, skinning, and putting it in their pickup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have never been in this type of situation, and I hope I never am. It's interesting to listen to others and their views and stories on this matter. Thanks!
 

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Me and my dad were actually in a situation similar to this about 6-7 years back. He shot a small buck and it ran down into a gully with some quakies. My dad started walking down to it after sometime, thinking it had expired in that stand of trees. The deer ended up popping out of the trees and another group of 3 hunters all popped off a round or two at that thing as it ran away, finally dropping it. My dad got there about the same time as them but willingly gave them the deer after the amount of lead that had been pumped through that thing.
 

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So many more factors to consider to decide that one. Are hunters A and B hunting together? If so, it might change things. If they are not together, how much time between shots? How far did animal travel? Talking about shot placement might become tricky.

Basically, it comes down to not being a jerk. You might have shot an animal first, but under the circumstances hunter B deserves to tag it as he killed it. Don't be a jerk about it. You might be hunter B and have actually 'killed' the animal that hunter A deserves to tag. Don't be a jerk about it.

I could see something like this happening when multiple hunters are targeting the same animal. I know how much joy comes from hard work coming together. I also know how much frustration comes when hard work doesn't pan out. But I tend to believe that the answer to this in each situation will be clear if people just aren't jerks.
I feel like the world would be a lot better place if we all took the advice of "Don't be a Jerk." Good words to live by in the field and in general.
 

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I lost a spike elk one year after being both hunter A and B on a spike only hunt. Here is what transpired. After returning from the morning hunt. A herd of 5 cows with 4 spikes and a 5x5 came charging down the mountain towards camp. There were many camps in this area. Needless to say there was going to be a shootout. Fortunately for us our camp was the top camp and we got first crack at em. I happened to be the only member of our party that had my gun ready cuz I sat it on my camp chair. First shot dropped one of the spikes on the run. Shot was good through both lungs. As the rest of the herd ran off my spike managed to get to his feet and follow over the hill way behind but trying its best to keep up. My brother hollered at me to keep shooting. I could tell the elk was dead on its feet and replied " he aint going far" Well as he got over the hill and just out of site hunter C fired from way up on the other hillside and across the road. The timing of his shot and the elk succombing to my shot made it appear to hunter C that he had dropped it clean. They never saw us and had no idea I had shot the elk. I was hot on his trail and made it over the hill and to him laying there unable to move with his head up and last breaths upon him. One more shot from 20 feet through the head and I finished off my elk. Let the celibration begin right? Wrong.......Started gutting him and up the hill comes hunter C with his posse. Long story short me and my bro were bullied off my elk due to being young kids at the time (18 years old) and we were drastically out numbered. Tough situation for sure.
 

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You answered it yourself. Hunter A never "killed it". If its alive and on its feet its fair and legal game for anyone else. Learn to hit'em right the first time and the issue is moot.-DallanC
So every big game animal you have shot has dropped right in its tracks? Have you ever shot a big game animal?

Back about 30 some years ago my Dad was friends with this old miner named Dave. Now Dave was a rough character, the kind of guy that took a bath with his clothes on because they needed cleaned to or cleaned the house with a garden hose then shot holes in the floor to get the water to drain out of the low spots.

Well old Dave shot a deer one time and as this deer was stumbling around dieing some other guy decided to put a few rounds into it. Upon reaching the deer this other fellow started to claim it was his and as Dave protested the guy got down right nasty, well Dave being Dave drew his old 45 1911 colt and proceeded to dump 6 rounds into the hind quarters of this deer then with the muzzle somewhat facing the offending party and with one round in the chamber he calmly changed magazines while explaining to the guy he could have the deer and he better pack the whole thing off the mountain. After a fine spit of his bubblegum and cigar wad on the horns Dave turned and walked off. Last time the other guy was seen he was packing that deer back to the truck.
 

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I agree that dropping an animal.in it's tracks is the best way to keep these situations from occurring; HOWEVER, a one lung or liver shot deer can go quite a ways before expiring even though it is essentially dead on it's feet. We as hunters need to be more courteous and less like a jerk in these situations. If you knew after the fact that Hunter A actually put a good shot on the animal before your follow up, would you really demand that deer from Hunter A? I hope not!!
 

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I shot my biggest buck in 2013. The shot was far back in the hind quarter, he ran from the top of the mountain all the way to the paved road. I was certain another hunter was going to shoot him, but rather the opposite happened. Multiple hunters watched me quickly heading down the mountain and encouraged me to hurry by waving their arms in a forward motion and yelling "He's over here". I was able to catch up to him and watch him lay down. I was lucky, I got to finish what I started.

If someone else would have shot him I would have been upset and disappointed. It would have been my fault for making a poor shot in the first place.
 

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I agree that dropping an animal.in it's tracks is the best way to keep these situations from occurring; HOWEVER, a one lung or liver shot deer can go quite a ways before expiring even though it is essentially dead on it's feet. We as hunters need to be more courteous and less like a jerk in these situations. If you knew after the fact that Hunter A actually put a good shot on the animal before your follow up, would you really demand that deer from Hunter A? I hope not!!
It's too bad people can't simply do the right thing.
 
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