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I have been duck hunting down here for a couple years now and I am curious. Are there many or any rivers in northern Utah to float hunt and jump shoot? As everyone says not looking for secret spots. I just want to know about areas where it is even possible. It was something we used to do at home alot and I would love to do it again!
Thanks in advance
 

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I think you could walk a lot of them and jump shoot. Any that you could float would have issues with private land, state parks, etc. I would think.
But float hunting would be a lot of fun.
I ran into ducks this weekend while grouse hunting, wished I could have taken them home too.
 

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Yeah, float hunting is a ton of fun! Walking rivers in Utah can be a little difficult because of the river laws here. If you are floating it is legal to go through private land as long as you do not anchor or touch the river bed. You just need to make sure your birds land in the river which takes a little discipline to only shoot birds that will fall into the river.
 

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Yeah, float hunting is a ton of fun! Walking rivers in Utah can be a little difficult because of the river laws here. If you are floating it is legal to go through private land as long as you do not anchor or touch the river bed. You just need to make sure your birds land in the river which takes a little discipline to only shoot birds that will fall into the river.
Thats still Illegal. You cannot control your shot, which enters private land and is trespassing. Its irrelevant where the duck lands, you cannot shoot into private land, period. If you shot them on the water before they lifted off... keeping all shot on the river you might be ok. Once they get in the air, you're screwed.

-DallanC
 

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DallanC, can you quote your source on that?

The only issue with private property that I know of in this instance would be discharging a firearm within 600 feet of a building without permission from the owner, or the aforementioned issues with trespass law. I have never heard of any concern with bullets or shot ending up on private property that isn't a structure or something that stands to be destroyed by being shot (cars, signs, livestock, people, etc.). I could be wrong, and that's why I request a source.
 

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DallanC, can you quote your source on that?

The only issue with private property that I know of in this instance would be discharging a firearm within 600 feet of a building without permission from the owner, or the aforementioned issues with trespass law. I have never heard of any concern with bullets or shot ending up on private property that isn't a structure or something that stands to be destroyed by being shot (cars, signs, livestock, people, etc.). I could be wrong, and that's why I request a source.
Unless you've been living under a rock, I'm sure you're aware of the fight between sportsmen and landowners regarding river usage when those rivers go through private land. What he's referring to is that in places where you can legally float through private land, if you shoot waterfowl and it lands on the private land you've already broken the law in one way or another because you either have to get out and trespass or you have to waste a game animal. You can't ethically shoot waterfowl while floating through private land really, the possibility of runners is always there.
 

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Collegehuntnfish. There are a few rivers in Utah you can float and hunt but sadly I'm not aware of the ones you could hunt up north. Allot of people float and hunt the green river in areas and the sevier is another option but yes you'd have to do your homework on private vs public land.
 

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Unless you've been living under a rock, I'm sure you're aware of the fight between sportsmen and landowners regarding river usage when those rivers go through private land. What he's referring to is that in places where you can legally float through private land, if you shoot waterfowl and it lands on the private land you've already broken the law in one way or another because you either have to get out and trespass or you have to waste a game animal. You can't ethically shoot waterfowl while floating through private land really, the possibility of runners is always there.
That's goes without saying, or at least it should. It says right in the guidebooks not to shoot game you can't retrieve. That's not what I'm taking issue with though, Jedediah. The issue I have is the assertion that you can't legally shoot towards private property. So long as you are sure the game you shoot at would fall in a place you CAN legally retrieve it, such as paddling over and picking it up from the water, and when you shot it, you were sure to shoot in a safe and legal direction, where life and property weren't in danger, it doesn't matter if you shot towards private ground or not. If I'm wrong here, someone please correct me. I know of at least one trip I have planned this year where I'll be hunting a WMA that is adjacent to private land full of grass and russian olive trees, and not much else. I'd hate to get in trouble for taking out a rooster that's trying to escape the WMA and heading for those trees.
 

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You're technically right but you'd have to be in a pretty perfect world for it to work out on any of the rivers in this state, except maybe the Green, because they're just not wide enough to get shots that drop birds in flowing water and then not deposit the birds on the bank. Like DallanC says, you can't stop or anchor at all at all when floating through public land. Only incidental contact with shore and obstacles is allowed. So you would have to flush the birds directly up or down stream and then calculate their falling trajectory before taking the shot, after waiting for them to gain sufficient altitude that you avoid possible property damage. Good luck timing perpendicular fly-over shots. All of this ignores the inevitable runners. I don't mean to disagree with you that you can't shoot over public land, I'm saying that it isn't ethical to try and drop birds onto a river on private land.

Then there's dogs. Say your dog gets out to retrieve the bird but decides to go chase some cows he sees. Farmers are legally allowed to shoot the dog the moment that starts. Just not a good idea all around.

Edit: keep in mind there are quite a few really good places where rivers flow through public land or WIAs and also hold waterfowl.
 
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