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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any suggestions on a fly tying kit, I got into fly fishing over the summer. But now that it's winter I need something to do. And Fly tying seems like something I'd like to do. Any suggestions?
 

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I wouldn't suggest a pre-made fly tying kit. Most of them come with very cheap materials, and are targeted more at Eastern geographies (meaning the items included aren't always common patterns here). The tools are also low-end and will make you want replacements as you gain skill.

The best advice I can give is to buy a decent quality vice, something like a Griffin Montana Mongoose, Renzetti Traveler, or whatever fits your budget. Then buy the materials you need to tie the flies you've been using.

As with most hobbies, you will learn faster and tie higher quality flies right out of the gate if you use good tools and materials. The kits often make learning frustrating. Get yourself a vice, ceramic bobbin, good pair of tying scissors, and a whip finisher to start. Your local pro shop would be a big help in picking out some materials for the kinds of flies you want to start with.
 

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I don't like kits that come with materials and hooks. These kits are full of cheep feathers and junk that you don't need.
Buy a kit that has tools to tie with including a vice, but doesn't come with tying materials.
Sportsman's Warehouse has several kits including two kits that come in wooden boxes.
As a beginner, don't spend a lot of money on your first vice.
Just like your first fly rod and reel, get something that works, but you won't need the top of the line yet.
As far as materials go, ask the salesperson to help you. Let them know the fly patterns that you are interested in and which patterns are easy to tie.
There are a few kits that include a vidio that will help or just buy a good tying vidio seperately.
Fly tying lessons will be a big advantage for you. Most classes will offer the use of vices, tools and materials in the cost of the class.
Take the class first and you will have a much better idea of what you will want to purchase for yourself.
 

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Yes, stay away from the pre-assembled kits, as others have said. I know it's an easier way to go, but the quality of the tools in most kits are lacking and the materials aren't really what you need. I would instead go buy a vise, bobbin, hackle pliers, whip finisher, bodkin, scissors and maybe a bobbin threader to start with. Start with good tools and you won't regret it. A Griffin vice and Tiemco brand tools are good, dependable bets. As far as materials, start on a small scale and get only what you need at first. Talk to the guys at Sportsman's or Cabelas and they will hook you up.

As far as a fly to start with, I would go with the wooly bugger. This is a good fly for the beginner to tie...not that difficult and it can catch you lots of fish. Here is the link to the tutorial. http://www.charliesflyboxinc.com/flybox ... arentID=41

Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow thanks for the info guys i was going to buy a pre assembled kit :oops: . Now I have some better info Im going to get a good vice and other tools. And I think I will start with the wooly bugger Rocki.
 

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BrookTroutKid said:
Wow thanks for the info guys i was going to buy a pre assembled kit :oops: . Now I have some better info Im going to get a good vice and other tools. And I think I will start with the wooly bugger Rocki.
That was all great advice. One more thing I would like to add. If you are going to get a nice vice, I would suggest a rotary vice. A rotary vise allows you to rotate the fly while it is in the vice. It makes it really easy to rib your flies or wrap other materials around the hook shank. It also helps you be more consistent with tying. They are worth every penny imo.

Here is a little article on a rotary vise.
http://www.flyanglersonline.com/flytyin ... rt199.html

That site that rocki linked you is great, I have used it a lot when learning a new pattern.

Good Luck
 

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x2 on the rotary vise. One of the best fishermen I know uses a Danvise, which is a fairly inexpensive rotary that works great. Get a good bobbin or two and some good scissors. Probably a good whip finisher as well. If you go with low quality on those tools it will come back to haunt you. Another suggestion is to use high quality hackle. The cheap stuff is always short and hard to use. Have fun-
 

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I just got a pre-assembled kit for Xmas myself-
The included tools included are, obviously, not the greatest quality but entirely adequate. I like the vise, bobbin, whip finisher and threader, but the scissors really blow. The other complaint is the materials- cheap, chintzy, and in outlandish colors I doubt I'll ever use. Luckily, I've had some fair success duck, grouse, chukar, rabbit, squirrel, and elk hunting the last few years, so I've got materials that I've kept from those critters. I knew I'd start tying one day, just didn't know when.
I've already made a few nymphs (I'm mostly a wet flyman), and I love the time and attention to detail. Haven't been to the bar in 2 weeks (my girl really likes that)! I don't have a drinking problem; just a boredom problem. I tied a nymph I named after her today, and that earned some serious brownie points. Have no idea if it'll catch fish- just looks cool. :wink:
anyway- my opinion on the kits: Tools acceptable for now. Materials, waste of money.
 
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