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I had a trainer FF my pooch. You can certainly do it yourself, but it is one of those things that can really make or break a dog. I didn't trust myself and let a pro do it. No regrets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've force fetched a couple dozen dogs just curious what people's thoughts are I believe it's the gateway to every other concept
 

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What did you pay, Greenhead? If you don't mind my asking...
I paid for a month's worth of boarding and just had the trainer FF her over the course of that month, so technically I paid for the boarding and not really the FF if that makes sense. If memory serves me correct it was $450 for the month. I used Steve Shaver in Cornish.
 

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All of my setters go through a FF program. I do all my own training. I believe it does more than teach fetch. I believe it is where the dog learns he must do things my way. Obedience shoots through the roof after FF. I do it a bit older than some though. I like to let them go through a first bird season before I FF.
 

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I am going to start this very soon. My questions, Does the dog need to be fully proficient in obedience training, or is it something you can do around the same time? We've got the sit and heel down perfect, but the come and place still need some work.
 

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I am going to start this very soon. My questions, Does the dog need to be fully proficient in obedience training, or is it something you can do around the same time? We've got the sit and heel down perfect, but the come and place still need some work.
i know this is an old post but if you haven't started already...

for me, force fetch comes after basic obedience and after permanent teeth have come in. anything can be worked around but some foundation helps the process go smoothly. fwiw, i don't feel like every dog needs FF to be a good hunting dog. it may clean up a few problems with hold or hard mouth for you but its not always a necessity. for dogs used in guide services or extreme climates, you may benefit from the force fetch a lot. just remember that sometimes there is a reason the dog is refusing a retrieve and it might be a good one. the health of you dog trumps any retrieve. bring waders and a walking stick.;-)

you can hire someone to do it but i'd suggest you research them well. a good trainer is usually humble and comes with a good reputation. the other guys are mostly hacks that enjoy blabbing to anyone who will listen. choose wisely.
 

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Bret,
When you say you want your dogs to go through a first bird season before doing FF, is that at a certain age, or just when they are really introduced to birds and their jobs? I have a dog that will be 2 years at the end of next season, this last one he was just old enough to get a taste of ducks... I'm wondering if you do FF as soon as they've gotten a taste of their job, or after they've been run through the ringer and end up needing it.
 

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I want that first season to just be fun and games. I only shoot pointed birds but put up with some puppy stuff. I wouldn't want to let a puppy get to old. But not really a certain age I just want them to love finding and pointing that first year. If they retrieve great if they drop a bird or two. I will worry about fixing that with FF later. That is just what I do. There are lots of opinions.
 
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