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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Today I went for a lunch time duck hunt. Shot one mallard. It is a spot I frequently see fox and coyote tracks while out duck hunting. A week or two ago I saw new tracks in the fresh snow that indicated a fox had passed my duck blind twice without me even knowing. Anyway, I didn't set up today so I was just out looking to jump birds. I stumbled upon a village of dens. There must have been 6 or 7 active dens all in one small area. There were probably even more than that if I would have searched around. It seemed like the tracks were all fox. There were fresh tracks in the snow everywhere going into the dens. The area is decent for pheasants but would probably be better if I eliminated some of the predators. I have a wounded rabbit call and a coyote single reed call. Do I just setup downwind in camo and start hitting the rabbit call? What time of day would be best to do this? Would it work in the middle of the day? Also are the pelts worth keeping? What time of year are they nice looking? Is there anything cool you can do with a fox pelt? Make something? Would a few sharp barks from the coyote call help? how far from the dens should I set up? It is really flat area and I could probably see the dens from as far as 300 yards away. Any other advice? No, I won't tell you where they are. Yet. Thanks.
 

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If your spot is on a WMA, I would make sure you can shoot a rifle. It sounds like a good set up if ya can shoot a rifle there. If ya cant shoot a rifle, you could get some non toxic shot and go pound em. I would stick to a mouse call or a wounded rabbit. The coyote might scare them, although I have a video of foxes coming into a coyote howl. I have no clue what the best time is for pelts. If ya read my post just before yours youll see Im as dumb as a box of rocks when it comes to that.
 

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A sure guarantee if there is ever a guarantee is a snare. You can buy those at Sportsmans wharehouse but you need a furbearers permit and you need to check them daily. What you do is you set the snare up right at the hole so if the fox ever goes home or leaves he is nabbed. As far as the pelt goes. You can dispose of it or you have to know someone who can flesh it for you or learn how to flesh it yourself and then send it to someone who can cure it. It can be worth up to $40 if you are new to it though that would be about $4 or less an hour. Becuase skinning the fox and fleshing it for your first time will probably take about that long. The good thing about a snare is if the fox is caught he is caught. He cant just chew his lower torsoe off.
 

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If we knew someone that had hunting Teckels (Dachshund) that is the most effective way to hunt fox from their den. They are bred and trained to go to ground mainly for fox. Often a small pen light is attached to the collar, and they are rubbed up and petted so there is plenty of human scent. When the Teckel goes down into the den, the fox usually heads out the back door where hunters with shotguns and/or kill dogs are waiting.

Great fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On a WMA how would I know if you can use a rifle or not? I haven't seen stuff like that covered in the proclamations, unless I am skipping that part. If they are not allowed there would I have to use non toxic shot? Do the waterfowl rules cross over into shooting nongame species? I would probably opt for 00 buck shot.
 

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milenine said:
On a WMA how would I know if you can use a rifle or not? I haven't seen stuff like that covered in the proclamations, unless I am skipping that part. If they are not allowed there would I have to use non toxic shot? Do the waterfowl rules cross over into shooting nongame species? I would probably opt for 00 buck shot.
I belive any of the main water fowl WMA'S like public shooting grounds, Ogden bay, Harold Crane, Howards slough, and farmington bay are all restricted to non toxic shotgun shot. The water fowl rules are from the feds. They could care less what you shoot at a fox, its what the migratory birds might eat they are worried about. I would call the regional office for the area youre looking at. If you call the Northern Office, talk to Scott Davis. He would know.
 

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Remember also, a fox is not necessarily a "non-game, unprotected" animal. A furbearers permit is still required for any "taking" of the grey fox and there is also a season in which to take them. If they are red foxes, they may be taken with any legal firearm and at any time of year and do not require a license. The big question remains if it is on a WMA or not. If it is, you will need to seek permission from the manager. Some WMAs will not allow the taking of predators at all.
 

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I'v called on the WMA fox hunting thing in the past and they told me that if I was hunting waterfowl with the proper license and saw a fox I could shoot it with a shotgun and proper shell. If, however, it was not waterfowl season, I could not. The gentleman also told me that trapping in the WMA was bid out to trappers, and the one(s) who get the bid are the only one(s) allowed to trap WMA's. I made that call about five years ago so things may have changed.
 
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