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Is there an easy way to do it on your own? ;-) It wold be something that I have never done before.. I would like to make a lot of jerky, but I don't really want to pay someone $10 or more per pound to make it for me.. Anyone know of any good YouTube tutorials? Or is there anyone in the Ogden/Morgan area that just loves to cut up game and would like to help beginner out. Last year was my first year big game hunting and I just took the deer down to Arnold's in Ogden.

Is it going to be too hot this week to let the meat hang in my garage?

I have access to a dehydrator. I would need to go pick up a meat grinder. My dad really likes the summer sausage, so I have talked him into getting the stuff for that if I do this on my own.

Any advice/tips would be greatly appreciated! :D
 

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Hey Adam, ignore the nifty jackwang.

Processing your own game isn't too challenging, it just can be time consuming until you are familiar with it. Basically, what you are going to do is separate out each of the muscle groups and cut out anything you don't want to eat + silver skin. Double wrap in freezer paper, label and enjoy.

Jerky, are you talking ground jerky or sheet jerky?
Sheet jerky is harder to make without some tools, but it is tastier. I don't have any tutorial or something that I use (i don't make much as I prefer to eat these cuts as steaks/roasts). I like to slice with the grain for jerky (holds together better IMO) and make my slices less than 1/4" thick, then marinate and dehydrate. It is simple in theory, but getting good with the knives is the trick. If you have a meat slicer, lot easier. You can also make a box type thing to set the meat in and use as a guide to slice at the desired thickness.

Temps this week look too hot IMO for hanging. You can also age in a large cooler with ice if you really want to. It isn't as great as hanging, but it definitely works to help the animal get through rigor mortis. I have a 220 qt cooler that fits most deer if the legs are cut below the knee and the neck at the shoulder.

Best advice I can give you is look around, possibly try out some of wyogoob's recipes, and have fun with it.
 

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Steven Rinella - Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Guide-Hunting-Butchering-Cooking/dp/081299406X/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442866688&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=stevem+rinella

It is a fantastic book.

I do not do hamburger.

I saw the shanks and make Ossobucco.

I stew the neck meat and rib meat.

If the skin is off the deer and the flies can't get to it, it will age (which is a good thing). I would still debone it and trim off the fat, to let the meat cool and age.
 

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Last year I got my first deer as well. Wanting to learn to do this on my own as well, I called my brother who is still yet to get an animal...

I had de-boned the deer on the mountain and then had it in the fridge for a few days. He came over and we just went to work. There are several videos you can find to help you determined what you want to make from the different muscle groups.

Biggest key we found...KEEP IT CLEAN!

The whole process took us a couple hours but we were newbies at it ourselves.

The steaks were the best deer steaks I have ever had! My brother doesn't really like deer (likes elk much better) but he loved them too! Once we had everything cut I double-wrapped everything in butcher paper and have been enjoying it ever since. I am yet to be making any jerky, my jerky and ground is still wrapped, waiting for me to make the time to make it. I've been looking around for a couple good recipes to try out to see what I want to do with it. The guys and gals on this forum have been great, I think I have four recipes I want to try out...now I just need to find the time!

Good luck!
 

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I've done my own and while I'm not nearly as quick as I'd like, I've always been very happy with the final product. When I lived in an apartment, I'd debone in the field and bring everything back in garbage bags. I put it all in the refrigerator and worked on it a little at a time, double wrapped in plastic coated butcher paper and froze it. I've found that the plastic coated butcher paper is a million times better than the non-coated. With the coated stuff I had two packages of steaks that got misplaced and I ate two years later. They tasted as good as the day they went in the freezer.

I've recently found this guy's youtube channel. He's got some less common ways to butcher wild game that I'm going to try this fall.

As for cutting uniform thicknesses for jerky, I place two 1/4" dowels on my biggest cutting board or clean counter and place the frosted roast between the dowels. Using the longest knife I have, I use the dowels as guides to cut slabs off the roast. It's worked pretty well so far.
 

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Steven Rinella - Hunting, Butchering, and Cooking Wild Game

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Guid...42866688&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=stevem+rinella

It is a fantastic book.

I do not do hamburger.

I saw the shanks and make Ossobucco.

I stew the neck meat and rib meat.

If the skin is off the deer and the flies can't get to it, it will age (which is a good thing). I would still debone it and trim off the fat, to let the meat cool and age.
this book rocks, its not just recipes...it has sections on gear, finding places to hunt, hunting strats(also covers how thermals can effect wind direction throughout the day...), game processing, then there are also some really good food recipes...
 

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I Cut up my animals the same day as they were killed. I have found the meat to taste better that way. I think the key to good game meat is to debone and cut the fat off. My meat is very lean when cut up. If you are going to jerky the meat, I would cut my meat into roasts and freeze it until you are ready to jerky it. A roast can be thawed and cut up at anytime and jerked when ever you are ready to make it. Just my opinion.
 

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After paying a lot more that I wanted to have a butcher take care of a cow elk... then finding hair and bone in the ground... I decided to butcher my own several years back. And I have not looked back since.

Over the last three years I've butchered 9 deer and 2 elk all on my kitchen table. Just take your time and make sure you trim all the fat and silver skin off and be meticulous with making sure you get all the stray hairs.

There are a handful of benefits I have seen from butchering my own...
- first, I've saved a ton of money doing it myself
- second, I can portion the wraps of steaks and other cuts appropriately for my family. With 7 mouths to feed I can customize how many steaks are in each wrap and trim the roasts to the perfect size for the crock-pot.
- third, I get to try crap out! One of the biggest hits with my family is to make the Hi Mountain breakfast sausage. The kids absolutely love the biscuits and sausage gravy with the deer sausage. We also love the pepperoni snack sticks (either Cabela's brand kit or Hi Mountain). I've tried sausages but haven't found one that I really like yet. I've been eyeing some of the salami recipes that Goob has posted on the recipes forum and may give some of that a try here soon.
- fourth, I know I'm getting my meat from my animal and it's been processed and packaged according to my standards.
- fifth, the biggest win is with my wife becaue she sees how it's cared for and the painstaking detail that I take in trimming and butchering she is more willing to cook and eat it than the game animals that I killed early in our marriage when I wasn't as meticulous or paid somebody else to do it.

Bottom line is I'm able to make the cuts that I know my family will use... not what the butcher usually does to satisfy everybody else.
 

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I know I'm in a minority on this, but, if you can learn to distinguish between the two types of fat on an animal (a harder yellower tallow, and a softer white) leaving some of that delicious fat cap on the rump of an elk is awesome! I do try to use those cuts within a year though, as they do develop a stronger flavor over time. But that soft, white fat is just plain tasty!

And if you aren't ready to go full goob, but want to try something different, take the kidney fat and the caul fat (looks like a web on the outside of the stomach). Grind the kidney fat with your burger and enjoy every delicious juicy bite, and use the caul fat to wrap roasts. MMMM
 

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The best way to learn is to just do it...

Deer don't yield enough meat for me to do much but steaks from the backstraps and tenderloin, and burger for the rest. (we eat more burger anyway)

Regardless of how you want it, the steps are the same... get the meat off the bone, cut out the fat, silver skin, and as much sinew as you can, and enjoy.

The more you do it, the faster/better you'll get at it.
 

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I just picked up this set of DVDs and really love them. You can watch, cut, watch, cut, etc.

http://www.cabelas.com/product/outdoor-edge-advanced-game-processing-library-dvds/747344.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Ntk%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dmeat%252Bprocessing%252Bdvds%26x%3D10%26y%3D6%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%252BProducts&Ntt=meat+processing+dvds

Also growing up, my Mother would take ground meat (burger) and make jerky on the dehydrator - it was always awesome! I used her method with some elk burger and high mountain seasoning last year for a batch of jerky and it was very good!
 

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The most time consuming part is separating the muscles as you take it off the bone. Don't do this. Take the bone out of the meat, not the meat off the bone. Also, +1 on the cleaner you keep it in the field, the easier to cut up.

Make sure to keep some silver skin on the steak cuts, gives you something to chew on after dinner...:grin:
 

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I know I'm in a minority on this, but, if you can learn to distinguish between the two types of fat on an animal (a harder yellower tallow, and a softer white) leaving some of that delicious fat cap on the rump of an elk is awesome! I do try to use those cuts within a year though, as they do develop a stronger flavor over time. But that soft, white fat is just plain tasty!

And if you aren't ready to go full goob, but want to try something different, take the kidney fat and the caul fat (looks like a web on the outside of the stomach). Grind the kidney fat with your burger and enjoy every delicious juicy bite, and use the caul fat to wrap roasts. MMMM
I've always left the rump fat on just to prevent that area from drying out as much during my aging process. I like to age the elk for two weeks. This year I tried some render fat from my elk and I was quite surprise how well it tasted. I've always been told that the fat on wild game was very gamey, maybe its because I've gotten use to the gamey flavor that I didn't notice it in the fat. Anyway, I'm going to try and use more of it next year, and leave some of it in the roasts ( I've always dived in removing all the fat). :mrgreen: For the shanks, ossobucco is a great recipe for them. I'll as just remove the shank from the bone and through it in the crot pot all day and the meat turns out great..
 

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The best way to learn is to just do it...

Deer don't yield enough meat for me to do much but steaks from the backstraps and tenderloin, and burger for the rest. (we eat more burger anyway)

Regardless of how you want it, the steps are the same... get the meat off the bone, cut out the fat, silver skin, and as much sinew as you can, and enjoy.

The more you do it, the faster/better you'll get at it.
Hey, Happy Birthday!

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