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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a tinch early- but have the lettuce, radish . kale and spinach up.
Garlic is up about a 18". Saw 10 asparagus shoots coming up last night.
Went into town this weekend and saw they were selling fertilizer tea for $4 a gal.
Took an old blue plastic barrel and cut the top 1/3 off- put a faucet on the bottom and set it on a stand in the garden with 20 gal of H20- raked up 20# of goat poop and put it in a burlap bag and tied it off like a giant tea bag---------It be a brewing. See how that works this year- I'll wait until Memorial day for everything else. -
 

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What about the peas? I have a few just showing their little green sprouts. I'm probably only going to do Tomatoes, peppers, and green beans--maybe some carrots. Should be able to put the tomatoes and peppers in Mid-May.
 

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We start growing in the house, transfer to garden when it gets warm enough. Dont forget we had snow in June last year.


-DallanC
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes - I need to get the peas in but I will wait until this storms blows thru- they are talking possible snow-
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Anyone ever uses backstrap molasses on their garden plants- buddy doubled his hay output running it thru his irrigation pipes and
Farmer next to him grows hundreds of tomatoes and used the drip irrigation- they rate tomatoes on a 5.0 high for sugar content- his were a 4.8 average-
 

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Anyone ever uses backstrap molasses on their garden plants- buddy doubled his hay output running it thru his irrigation pipes and
Farmer next to him grows hundreds of tomatoes and used the drip irrigation- they rate tomatoes on a 5.0 high for sugar content- his were a 4.8 average-
never heard of it, any ideas on the ratio to use or how much per plant etc
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It puts the micro organisms back into the soil that salt based fertilizer takes out- the site I looked up- talked about using it in the fertilizer tea that I am brewing- said 2 to 3 tablespoons per gallon. This year is going to be a big experiment in the garden with different ideas on different plants and then take the best from that for the next year.
 

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It puts the micro organisms back into the soil that salt based fertilizer takes out- the site I looked up- talked about using it in the fertilizer tea that I am brewing- said 2 to 3 tablespoons per gallon. This year is going to be a big experiment in the garden with different ideas on different plants and then take the best from that for the next year.
if that gives any type of increase in yield or flavor that will be extremely cheap fertilizer...
 

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I got my soil prepped a little later than I wanted to, but last Monday night I got peas, beets, green onions, spinach, lettuce, and carrots in the ground. Anxiously awaiting those little green shoots poking through!
 

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So every year I get to read about the excitement of drawing tags. Then I get to read about all the cool scouting trips, the beautiful country seen and the countless bulls and bucks photographed. All of which I might add does not take place in 98% humidity. Finally I get to see the pictures and hear the stories of everyone's hunts. Be they "successful" or not, they're all awesome experiences that I get to read about. Notice I said I get to READ about it all. The whole time, I have to constantly reminding myself that coveting and envy are sins.

So this is just a small way for me to try and get back at ya'll. I took these pictures a couple of weeks ago. I pick fresh veggies daily, and I should have ripe tomatoes next month! Please excuse the mess. I'm working on putting a fence up to keep the rabbits out and more gravel/drain line to help with flooding issues we have when it rains too much in the spring.

This is the front box. It has strawberries, Garlic, onions, sweet peas, basil (still really small), oregano, rosemary, thyme, and sage planted in it.
IMAG0921.jpg

This is the same box from another angle.
IMAG0917.jpg

This is the back box. It has tomatoes (San Marzano, Abe Lincoln, and Brandywine), spinach, kale, lettuce (Iceburg, Romaine, and Butterleaf), swiss chard, shallots, and garden peas planted in it. It also had Chinese broccoli, but that has already been harvested and eaten.
IMAG0922.jpg

Back box from another angle.
IMAG0924.jpg

I've also got peppers (green bell, orange bell, red macaroni, jalapeno, thai hot, and bannana), squash (zucchini and crook neck), eggplant, and Japanese pumpkin planted in our front flower beds.

So take that!!!
 

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So every year I get to read about the excitement of drawing tags. Then I get to read about all the cool scouting trips, the beautiful country seen and the countless bulls and bucks photographed. All of which I might add does not take place in 98% humidity. Finally I get to see the pictures and hear the stories of everyone's hunts. Be they "successful" or not, they're all awesome experiences that I get to read about. Notice I said I get to READ about it all. The whole time, I have to constantly reminding myself that coveting and envy are sins.

So this is just a small way for me to try and get back at ya'll. I took these pictures a couple of weeks ago. I pick fresh veggies daily, and I should have ripe tomatoes next month! Please excuse the mess. I'm working on putting a fence up to keep the rabbits out and more gravel/drain line to help with flooding issues we have when it rains too much in the spring.

This is the front box. It has strawberries, Garlic, onions, sweet peas, basil (still really small), oregano, rosemary, thyme, and sage planted in it.
View attachment 58377

This is the same box from another angle.
View attachment 58369

This is the back box. It has tomatoes (San Marzano, Abe Lincoln, and Brandywine), spinach, kale, lettuce (Iceburg, Romaine, and Butterleaf), swiss chard, shallots, and garden peas planted in it. It also had Chinese broccoli, but that has already been harvested and eaten.
View attachment 58385

Back box from another angle.
View attachment 58393

I've also got peppers (green bell, orange bell, red macaroni, jalapeno, thai hot, and bannana), squash (zucchini and crook neck), eggplant, and Japanese pumpkin planted in our front flower beds.

So take that!!!
Wow!

Hey, looks like Iowa to me.

.
 

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Yep I remember gardening down in the deep south. If you made a small portable greenhouse you could garden almost year round. Grandpa raised veggies for market for a living and had half a dozen large greenhouses and grew some veggies year round. Needless to say we had fresh home grown veggies year round but we did work our tails off during the summer helping grandpa and grandma on the farm. Okra 10 feet tall...and tomatoes that actually had flavor...brings back memories.
 

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I'm all the way up in the north of Alabama about 10 miles from the Tennessee boarder, so not quite as warm as you're probably used to, but still pretty warm. I grew okra the first year I was down here and couldn't keep up with it. My wife doesn't like it and even with only 2 plants it was way more than I could handle. Ate a ton fried then blanched and froze the rest for soups and chili. just finished the last of it off recently. May try to plant some more this year.

The rest of the lettuce and spinach should be cleared out this weekend. I've planted back some of it and will use the rest of the space to plant soy beans and green beans.
 

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I'm all the way up in the north of Alabama about 10 miles from the Tennessee boarder, so not quite as warm as you're probably used to, but still pretty warm. I grew okra the first year I was down here and couldn't keep up with it. My wife doesn't like it and even with only 2 plants it was way more than I could handle. Ate a ton fried then blanched and froze the rest for soups and chili. just finished the last of it off recently. May try to plant some more this year.

The rest of the lettuce and spinach should be cleared out this weekend. I've planted back some of it and will use the rest of the space to plant soy beans and green beans.
Our family loves okra, grew up eating it all the time. I grew some here once but it took forever and the plants were barely 3 feet tall. Down south the okra grow almost as fast as zucchini....I remember having to go cut the okra every day or they got too big in 2 days!
 
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