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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have a strong opinion on GPS's?

I am trying to figure out if I should invest...

I tend to use google maps and other online map sources to research the areas I hunt before hand. but a gps seems like it would be helpful...
 

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If you hunt areas around private property they are very helpful with the property boundary chips. These require a GPS with an extra storage slot (Garmin models with extra storage usually end in "x"). Another cool feature to look for is if the unit is compatible with birdseye imagery... picture google earth on your GPS, only you can clearly see the bush your standing next to or the one the buck is bedded under. If you hunt/hike/scout year round, a GPS is well worth the investment. But if you go out once a year and already know the area its probably not. There are also people who simply don't know how to use their GPS and therefore don't like it. I use mine constantly and can't imagine life without it.
 

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I have a Magellan circa early 1990 something. It soured me to GPS, and strengthen my map and compass skills.

I just started playing around with my smart phone's built in GPS, I need to figure out how to down load maps, and some other things, but it has some promise. I use Google Earth and some other maps on the computer a lot, so a hand held is appealing for a lot of stuff.

In ROTC I taught a lot of people map and compass skills, it really opened my eyes. It was a skill I took for granted growing up. Now they teach how to use GPS, and I guess its just as comical, hasn't made it any easier apparently.

I'm interested in info as well.
 

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We have had good luck with the Garmin Rhinos. Then you have a map and 2-way radio. I have the 650 I believe and it works really well especially when I load the GPS Hunt maps to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i've tried using my phone before to download maps and stuff to use it as a gps, but my main issue with that is the cell phone battery life when sucking on gps data...

most of the Garmins seem to get close to 16 hours or so and they are AA batteries which can be changed out if hunting for long time or just only turn it on when needed...

I saw cabelas has their Garmin 64 basic model for 199...
 

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I started using GPS's in 2005, the kind where you have to find a clearing in the trees and hold still for 10 minutes until it finds three or four satellites. Like a lot of electronics, they've come a long way in 10 years. Now you can send text messages, waypoints, and radio communications to your buddy across the canyon, which has proven very helpful in stalking animals. A couple years ago, I was helping my dad hunt elk. He had never used a GPS before but I equipped him with a rino as I glassed from across the canyon. My dad came up the backside of the ridge, and as soon as he topped out I was able to tell him where a spike had gone around a hill, that he was probably bedded in some pines I could see on my GPS imagery, and how far of a shot it would be from his vantage point. His quote of the day was, "technology killed that elk." They are just like anything else we use in modern hunting... a tool. If you use them correctly, they can be a great tool. Or to some, they are an unnecessary and burdensome tool. In my opinion, when used to their maximum capabilities they can be very effective. My favorite thing to do is locate coyotes at night. I can triangulate coyote howls to within a pretty small area using my GPS. You can usually narrow it down to a particular wash, come back in the morning and kill them, all courtesy of Garmin.
 

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I have always used a Garmin Rino because I like the radio and the ability to relay locations to other members of my party that are using Rino's. I think the one I have now is a 655t? It has served me well but I learned to use the Ultimate Lithium batteries because it will drink the juice out of regular alkalines pretty fast.

I also use their Birdseye Imagery (Google Earth) which helps but the picture is not really clear when you zoom in. Last year after I downed my cow elk, the other two members were able to hike right to me using my relayed position without me having to even give any directions. My friend uses the rechargeable pack that they sell for them instead of the AA batteries...lasts a really long time until you need to charge the thing up on the mountain. -O,-
 

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I have an old one that I use to mark my trail cameras, truck, camp, etc. It has been really helpful for that stuff. I'm thinking about getting the garmin 650 for the two way radio feature. They are definitely a good thing to have.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I did some testing with the cabelas gps's on display and decided on the garmin 64s
I think it was 266 on amazon...i couldn't convince my self to go for a rhino...who knows maybe in the future with an upgrade.
 
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