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I day-hunted a spot during a previous season that I would like to return to this year. It was early archery season, end of August. It seemed to be a pre-rut staging area for some bulls. I had lots of bugles answered, and called in 4 bulls almost within range throughout the day. I headed back up to the same spot a couple days later with my brother to help call for me, but the elk were gone. The ranchers had been through to collect cattle, there were horse and dog tracks everywhere. I'm pretty confident the commotion of driving cattle out of the drainage had the same effect on the elk.

Long story short - are there any resources to see where and when cattle are grazing on National Forest land?
 

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The vast majority of the state has grazing allotments. They vary in size, what cattle are allowed, how many, and start and stop times. Some allotments are for cows, others for sheep. The grazing allotments are pretty much the same every year. If you hunt the same units year after year, you'll figure it out. Usually, they'll have their cows and sheep out by opening day, but they'll push it to the very end with maybe a couple days for the area to settle down again if your lucky. Sheep are the worst. They stink up the area with an amonia like smell, pretty much defoliate the area, and those great pyrenees are good at what they do - run everything off.

Sad to say, your just going to have to learn to work with it. The plus side is, you know where not to look. Elk will live NEXT to, but not with. Just sayin.
 

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The vast majority of the state has grazing allotments. They vary in size, what cattle are allowed, how many, and start and stop times. Some allotments are for cows, others for sheep. The grazing allotments are pretty much the same every year. If you hunt the same units year after year, you'll figure it out. Usually, they'll have their cows and sheep out by opening day, but they'll push it to the very end with maybe a couple days for the area to settle down again if your lucky. Sheep are the worst. They stink up the area with an amonia like smell, pretty much defoliate the area, and those great pyrenees are good at what they do - run everything off.

Sad to say, your just going to have to learn to work with it. The plus side is, you know where not to look. Elk will live NEXT to, but not with. Just sayin.
No joke on those sheep dogs, I've been run off myself 😂
 

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No joke on those sheep dogs, I've been run off myself 😂
I've had them chase my truck. One was close enough to slobber on the rear bumper for well over 1/4 a mile, if not longer. At this point, I no longer break for moutain maggots. Ill slow down to a crawl, ill lay on the horn, but I ain't stopping anymore. They'll move. If they're in an area elk would be in, I'll just leave. Waste of time. I've literally watched "Juoquin from Peru" run those **** maggots right though elk bedding areas and watch the herd flush out the other side while glassing.

Totally not jaded. :rolleyes:
 

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Many local USFS offices have the grazing information in binders that are available for public viewing. It's been a while since I checked one, I believe at the Bear River GS in the N Uintas.
 

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I've had them chase my truck. One was close enough to slobber on the rear bumper for well over 1/4 a mile, if not longer. At this point, I no longer break for moutain maggots. Ill slow down to a crawl, ill lay on the horn, but I ain't stopping anymore. They'll move. If they're in an area elk would be in, I'll just leave. Waste of time. I've literally watched "Juoquin from Peru" run those **** maggots right though elk bedding areas and watch the herd flush out the other side while glassing.

Totally not jaded. :rolleyes:
I am always tempted to offer Juoquin $50.00 cash for a tasty lamb to take to camp..... one of these years I am going to do it.
 

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I am always tempted to offer Juoquin $50.00 cash for a tasty lamb to take to camp..... one of these years I am going to do it.
12 pack Coke and bag of Hostess Fruit Pies aka American Empanadas and Juoquin will tell you were elk are and offer to drag them to road.

My grandpa trailed two herds from mountain to west desert with several herders from his teens until he married grandma. Incredible man and I picture him when I see the herders and dogs. His eyes didn't miss anything when we were out in the mountains.
 

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I am always tempted to offer Juoquin $50.00 cash for a tasty lamb to take to camp..... one of these years I am going to do it.
If you only you knew what those guys could do for you.;) They know where every Elk is on the mountain and if you get to know them, they are some of the greatest folks in the woods I've met. It was a tradition for myself and George to meet up every year at his camp to eat a mutton meal he prepared. Funny that I filled my Elk tag every year for 5 consecutive years before he retired from the sheep tending.
 

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The answer is in your title - the Forest Service has answers to grazing on Forest Service managed land. Allotments differ in timing, durations, and rotations across the landscape. Even individual allotments differ year to year. Go to the USFS office for that forest and talk to the range conservationist.
 
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