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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We ran up to the Southwest Wyoming portion of Utah for a little weekend getaway. While fishing might not have been easy, it sure was a good trip.

Rain, muddy water, leaky waders, frozen waders, moose, cloudy skies, sunny skies, sunburns, chills...I think we had it all.

good times!







 

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All of it. Hiking is terrible without a gun or rod in my hands.
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That's an awesome float. The scenery isn't usually the great, but there are some very large fish. Were the salmon running up yet?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
never saw any kokes.

I like the scenery. It's amazing that you can throw a river in the middle of rolling sagebrush hills, and have a lush, green, beautiful riparian zone that a plethora of wildlife call home. Mule deer, pronghorn, moose, swans, geese, ducks, pelicans, coyotes, racoons....it's a scene right out of an African savanna!

God bless public lands, and public access to public resources!!


And, yes: the great horned owls are alive and well, hooting their happy little hearts out all night long.
:confused:
 

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Awesome fish and pics. Thanks for sharing!

Quick question. In some previous discussions about tubes, pontoons, etc.. either you or your brother mentioned that you all did a lot of stillwater fishing out of rafts. Are those the rafts you use or do you use something else and rent those in the report for river runs?
 

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My dad uses the smaller raft (the one pictured on the right) in all of his stillwater trips. I use a different less expensive raft on mine. I love the rafts on stillwater and rarely use my pontoon and haven't used a float tube in years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
As W2U mentioned, the smaller of the two rafts is what Dad uses exclusively on still waters here in southern Utah. It's great when he's by himself, or he can bring 1 or 2 additional people with him. That smaller raft is like a 10' raft, and has an aluminum rowing frame we had custom built for it. He has his trailer set up with bunks that the raft(s) sit on top of. He can then load / unload by himself if he needs. It works really well. They are both Hyside rafts -- pretty nice quality rafts that are built for running some pretty rough water.

The big raft is a 14' raft. It's way nice. Custom rowing frame, dry box storage, cooler slot, self-bailing bottom, room for 4 adults (or more!) -- we typically have 1 rower, 2 in the front fishing, and 1 in the back. The guy in the back doesn't typically fish; that's just too many lines swinging around.

They are great boats. For longer trips, we just deflate / disassemble, and roll them up. Pile them on the trailer, and off we go. Even rolled up, the AIS checks at the borders are pretty quick.

Another advantage with these boats is that we don't necessarily need ramp access to launch the boats. Even up in Wyoming on the Green, we can launch at spots that a dory can't. It's nice to float sections and never see another boat.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I use a different less expensive raft on mine. I love the rafts on stillwater and rarely use my pontoon and haven't used a float tube in years.
If you have kids that you want to take with you, this is a great option. Intex makes some decent, affordable inflatable rafts (Mariner series). Add a small rowing frame to them, and you've got a nice options for you and a kid to go drag some flies around...
 
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