Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.
Here I am showing our Green Scout electric all-terrain vehicle.
All-terrain vehicle 6 wheeled, electric, side-turning. Rides, jumps, dances, swims, but does not fly. The drive is permanent (but you can turn off any wheel arbitrarily through the controller). The power of each wheel is 3 kW at its peak, the total power is 18 kW. Speed up to 60 km / h. Since the all-terrain vehicle is electric, it starts from a place quickly, drives silently (well, of course, the sound from tires and shock absorbers does not disappear).
The idea of creating such an all-terrain vehicle came after the experience of operating the Argo all-terrain vehicle. The main disadvantages of the wheeled side-turning all-terrain vehicle are low ground clearance, lack of suspension. To get high ground clearance and suspension, there are two outputs on mini all-terrain vehicles - either electric drive or hydraulic. The hydraulics had to be excluded, since at temperatures below -30C it does not work, plus it always flows. As a result, we settled on an electric transmission. Each wheel is a motor-wheel. Naturally, the motor-wheels were being finalized to be able to be installed on an all-terrain vehicle and to be able to swim. The battery is iron-phosphate, all information on the battery, the charge is displayed on the smartphone. Control of the all-terrain vehicle through the on-board computer. Bicycle handlebar controls. Braking either with the sides through a turn of the steering wheel, or with the gas pedal of all wheels at once.
Overview video of the all-terrain vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
I'm confused... it got stuck in mud then caught on fire and burned up? My Honda Foreman I bought new in 1997... still going strong, rarely been stuck on it, never caught on fire... or even started one.

You probably should get new marketing folk. People want to know cost, how many miles of use per charge, does it float... can we get tracks for it etc etc. Oh and dont show it stuck, nor on fire. ;)

-DallanC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Green Scout is off. Have you watched the video? We were caught in a fire, the grass was burning, a passenger car burned down, our all-terrain vehicle was not injured. For example, your Honda Foreman would have burned out in such a fire, it is gasoline, fuel pipes close to the ground, plastic body kit. The Green Scout has a fiberglass hull and no gasoline.
In terms of cost, we are guided by the price of $ 9,999. In terms of mileage, now there is a 105 Ah battery, it is enough for 20 miles on light off-road. If desired, you can increase the battery capacity at times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
20 miles? Wow... And your talking light terrain.. So a gentle drive down a flat path on a dirt road. So if I were to use this on the La Sals, it would get me to the outhouse and back. I am sure there's a useful place for this type of machine. But probably not in the steep and deep mountains out west. Good luck!

I helped a hunter last year who used an electric side by side, not the Green Scout. He hunted a ranch in Colorado the week before coming to Utah. He actually picked up the side by side (brand new) in Texas on his way to hunt Colorado and Utah. That machine actually completely seized up early on his hunt in the Rockies. Then it was just dead weight up to Utah. He drove it back to Texas on his way back home. Again, I am sure that side by side which was a slick looking ride is very useful in flat or light hill terrain. But on the steep roads in the mountains, it was utterly useless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
As a positive to their concept, the suspension and clearance are a huge improvement over the old Argo style machines. I think overall the idea has merit. If it were a gas engine, with tracks... this thing would be great for ice fishing or hunting in deeper snow.

-DallanC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
20 miles on a single charge? dang sign me up....... seriously is there a spot for my generator to charge it every 5 minutes? i'm with Dallan give me my hondas all day over this thing.
Yes, 20 miles, with 105ah batteries. If you put a battery with a larger capacity, then you will get more mileage accordingly. And there is room for a generator. You can turn on the generator, stick a battery into it for charging - this way you get not an electric all-terrain vehicle, but a gasoline one with an electric transmission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am sure there's a useful place for this type of machine. But probably not in the steep and deep mountains out west. .
You have not paid attention to one circumstance. The Green Scout has perfect weight distribution and is very difficult to flip, so it will be safer on the slope than a regular ATV. As for steep climbs - battery capacity is important here, again you can put a more powerful battery. In reserve - if you are planning a long trip - then the generator will help you, it will charge your battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As a positive to their concept, the suspension and clearance are a huge improvement over the old Argo style machines. I think overall the idea has merit. If it were a gas engine, with tracks... this thing would be great for ice fishing or hunting in deeper snow.
And in fact, high ground clearance and suspension - this was the main requirement for improving the Argo-type all-terrain vehicle. Those who have ridden the Argo all-terrain vehicle may remember that every bump responds on the butt of the driver and passengers. My passenger, while riding the Argo, managed to break a rib, while jumping on a bump.
It is technically impossible to achieve high ground clearance and the presence of a suspension on a gasoline all-terrain vehicle. Therefore, I had to choose an electric drive. And you can wear tracks on our all-terrain vehicle. Winter is close, so I think we will soon post videos where we drive in the snow on tracks.
As for the power reserve - there are also 2 outputs, a generator and an extended battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,393 Posts
It is technically impossible to achieve high ground clearance and the presence of a suspension on a gasoline all-terrain vehicle. Therefore, I had to choose an electric drive. And you can wear tracks on our all-terrain vehicle.
Engine type, has nothing to do with suspension. And people have been building unbelievable high articulation vehicles for ages. These guys build this well over 30 years ago... its incredible what it can do.


No suspension with high ground clearance? Have you never watched a USA Monster Truck event? Big gasoline trucks racing around at high speeds jumping, climbing over cars and other large obstacles. I understand your enthusiasm for your product, but some of your claims are just wrong.

Here is the impossible... from 1987.



I think you dont understand the American mindset. We do want to preserve the environment, sure. But "American Muscle" is a thing... we want power, we want long range. The only thing cooler than 700HP engines is 800HP engines.

People do this just for funzies... take a 70 year old truck and put a 1200hp motor in it... why? Just because they can.

Winter is close, so I think we will soon post videos where we drive in the snow on tracks.
That begs the question on batteries and cold. lifepo4 batteries will incur permanent and irreversible damage if you charge them below freezing temps (32F / 0C). What protections are in place to prevent this? Are you using battery heaters, or cold temp voltage cutoffs?

Look, bottom line, I like the look of your machine. It needs 100mile range in brutal rough conditions... because that is what I use my ATV for... and you have to minimally exceed what that machine can do before I'd consider this a viable alternative (actually, I throw on a 2 gallon fuel can and I can nearly double that 100 mile range. I ride in EXTREMELY rough terrain. I go from 5000ft elevation to +10000ft just to get to where I hunt).

-DallanC
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,286 Posts
To add to Dallans post above on the range;

You need to be able to drive it 100 miles over brutal rough conditions and be able to recharge in in 8 hours at a bare minimum...

Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
To add to Dallans post above on the range;

You need to be able to drive it 100 miles over brutal rough conditions and be able to recharge in in 8 hours at a bare minimum.
I absolutely agree. And nobody wants to take their generator out with them to charge it in the middle of the drive. My daily outings can cover far over 20 miles. I get it, you can increase the battery capacity, but at what cost? With a starting point of 10G, your now getting into some of the "beginner" models of side by sides. Now add upgraded batteries, etc. I bought a brand new Teryx4 LE in 2018 for 12,300. I think we upgraded batteries your at least in that ballpark.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
You have not paid attention to one circumstance. The Green Scout has perfect weight distribution and is very difficult to flip, so it will be safer on the slope than a regular ATV. As for steep climbs - battery capacity is important here, again you can put a more powerful battery. In reserve - if you are planning a long trip - then the generator will help you, it will charge your battery.
I am not talking about safety, weight distribution, stability. I am talking about creeping up slick steep roads. Gaining a couple thousand feet in elevation. How do these perform at 10,000 feet or higher? You are saying that in light terrain which I imagine a farm in Kansas they get 20 miles before dead battery. If a person upgraded the battery, whats the best case scenario (50 miles), and do they have the low gear / torque to traverse steep terrain like the gas machines do?

I am really not poking fun at the machine. Just from experience with the other albeit not the Green Scout, I have questions as to the ability it would have in mountainous terrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Engine type, has nothing to do with suspension. And people have been building unbelievable high articulation vehicles for ages. These guys build this well over 30 years ago... its incredible what it can do.
I'm sorry. I have phrased my thought incorrectly. Technically, it is almost impossible to make a gasoline all-terrain vehicle with 6-8 wheels, with a floating body, in the dimensions of an ATV and which would have a high ground clearance and a suspension. There one problem after another goes. If you move the transmission to the bottom of the hull, then the height of the all-terrain vehicle rises sharply, again there are problems with waterproofing. If you take the chain drive outside the body, then this is unreliable.
That begs the question on batteries and cold. lifepo4 batteries will incur permanent and irreversible damage if you charge them below freezing temps (32F / 0C). What protections are in place to prevent this? Are you using battery heaters, or cold temp voltage cutoffs?
The battery compartment of the all-terrain vehicle is isolated from the interior of the all-terrain vehicle. The battery can also be used at temperatures below -10C. As for charging, you can additionally insulate the battery compartment, especially since it is actually already insulated with damping gaskets that protect the battery from jolts. Additionally, you can throw a heating cable inside the compartment, like throwing a heating cable into a gas tank in the far north.
Look, bottom line, I like the look of your machine. It needs 100mile range in brutal rough conditions... because that is what I use my ATV for... and you have to minimally exceed what that machine can do before I'd consider this a viable alternative (actually, I throw on a 2 gallon fuel can and I can nearly double that 100 mile range. I ride in EXTREMELY rough terrain. I go from 5000ft elevation to +10000ft just to get to where I hunt).
Well, elevation differences are not scary for an electric motor. He doesn't consume oxygen. As for the 100 mile range, I think it can be set as a separate option. Otherwise, we will not be able to fit into the price of $ 9,999 for the base model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I am not talking about safety, weight distribution, stability. I am talking about creeping up slick steep roads. Gaining a couple thousand feet in elevation. How do these perform at 10,000 feet or higher? You are saying that in light terrain which I imagine a farm in Kansas they get 20 miles before dead battery. If a person upgraded the battery, whats the best case scenario (50 miles), and do they have the low gear / torque to traverse steep terrain like the gas machines do?

I am really not poking fun at the machine. Just from experience with the other albeit not the Green Scout, I have questions as to the ability it would have in mountainous terrain.
Electric motors are not affected by altitude; they do not consume oxygen. When starting off, even up a hill, since these are electric motors, you can get from the start, immediately, up to 60-80% of the maximum power. The maximum torque goes up to 220 Nm. There are no crawler gears, as well as other gears, this is a motor wheel, yes, we have now developed our own motor-wheel with 4 gears, but I think it will take more than 1 year from its development to launch. And we will not install it on the Green Scout 3.0 model.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
Electric motors are not affected by altitude; they do not consume oxygen. When starting off, even up a hill, since these are electric motors, you can get from the start, immediately, up to 60-80% of the maximum power. The maximum torque goes up to 220 Nm. There are no crawler gears, as well as other gears, this is a motor wheel, yes, we have now developed our own motor-wheel with 4 gears, but I think it will take more than 1 year from its development to launch. And we will not install it on the Green Scout 3.0 model.
It looks like a fun machine in the right terrain. After watching the video, I wouldn't dare put anyone in that in steep terrain. Looks very uncomfortable and somewhat dangerous in bouncy conditions. Watching dudes bounce around in there holding on to the sides for life was telling. My favorite line was "we love nature, but the green scout is built like a tank to run small trees over."

Welcome to the forum anyways. Where are you from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It looks like a fun machine in the right terrain. After watching the video, I wouldn't dare put anyone in that in steep terrain. Looks very uncomfortable and somewhat dangerous in bouncy conditions. Watching dudes bounce around in there holding on to the sides for life was telling. My favorite line was "we love nature, but the green scout is built like a tank to run small trees over."
This is what, you should have seen how Argo breaks ribs. There, yes, you go and hold on to your ass.
Welcome to the forum anyways. Where are you from?
I'm from Mordor. From Russia.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top