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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all - I was briefly a member at the DWR site before it was shut down (my handle was fcbit1919). I'm glad that I found this site so I can keep pestering y'all for information. :)

I have been fishing the lower Provo off and on in the evenings for the past few weeks. I have gotten to the point where I can go and out and consistently get a fish, but they are very small - the biggest was less than 11". I really want to get into some bigger fish. I have been using small spinners and a bubble-and-fly rig. Today I tried to using a spoon and a Rapala to see if a bigger lure would produce a bigger fish, but I had no luck.

Does anyone have some advice to help me land something bigger than these planters? Should I keep trying the bigger lures - or do I need to start scouting some new spots? I have focused on places where the water is deeper and where there are larger rocks or fallen trees, thinking that these are areas where larger fish would hang out. I am not asking anyone to divulge their secret spot - I am just looking for some advice.

Thanks
 

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What flies are you using?
Try dragging a nymph or glo bug behind your first fly. That'll sometimes get those browns going. However, dont feel too bad. The provo has been shrinking as far as fish size goes, so perhaps the best thing is to take a few of those pan sized fish out. However, I saw a fish shock on the lower section last week, and several 16+" size fish were shocked. Theyre in there, theyre just smart. To grow that big, it means that they've had some hooks in their mouth before. good luck.
 

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Check out the stretches above and below the Bridal Viel Falls area. There are also some really nice backwaters just upstream from Upper Falls. I've taken pretty long fish out of there. They get dammed in by beavers and the inlets fade of to a trickle in the summer time. With the weird spill year from DC, anything is possible.

If you have some waders, those would come in handy.

Good luck.
 

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One thing to remember when fishing streams is that there is holding water and feeding water. Holding water is usually deeper water or water with cover. Trout will hold in deeper pools when they are in a neutral mood and not feeding much. They will hit a nymph if you get it right down to them on a natural drift but usually won't move too far for it. Then there are the feeding lies where most trout do their active feeding. This is often shallower and faster than the holding water-- especially in the summer when the water is warmer. When an emergence takes place trout will position where they can intercept nymphs, emergers, and dries in the drift while expending as little energy as possible. Current seams, where faster water meets slower water (there is usually a seam just off the bank) are a favorite feeding lie for trout. Riffled water of a couple feet in depth with moderate current is also a good place to look.

The longer a fish has to look at something, the more time it has to decide to reject the offering. That is why slow pools are often tough to fish in full daylight. Concentrate more on broken water and seams and you will start picking off more and larger fish. The small fish you are catching are dumb and opportunistic. As they grow they learn to differentiate between real food sources and you offerings. Rappalas and spinners obviously work or they wouldn't be so popular but the guys sticking large trout with them have learned where to place them and how to work them through the feeding lies. For flies to be more effective, a fly rod with floating line and appropriate leader and weight system will give a more natural presentation that will fool larger and smarter fish. I will refrain from directing you to any particular spots because anywhere you go on the provo holds larger fish than you have been catching. You just need to keep trying different presentations until you start solving the puzzles of fishing streams.

One last thing, bigger bait does not automatically translate to bigger fish. It works in some situations, but in streams you are often most successfull when matching the available food sources that the trout are used to eating. I have caught 10 inch trout on a 3 inch streamer and 20 inch trout on a #24 fly (you can fit a dozen # 24's on a quarter and have room left over). When I am having trouble fooling trout, a smaller fly is more often the answer than a bigger one.
 

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Great post ScottyP.
Thanks for sharing.
 

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Just to add on to that, when fishing smaller flies, don't forget to use thinner tippet. If you use thick tippet with small flies, the fish will have a better chance of seeing it, and will not take your offering. I normally use 6x with anything #16 and smaller. You loose more flies if you are not careful, but you get a lot more hits.
 

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Just to add on to scotty's insight which is wise, concentrate on a drag free drift. Look to mend your line so the current is not dragging the nymphs causing them to have an unnatural look. Try to cast above the current mend line and let the current take your nymphs to the fish. If you are fishing the provo red wd40's and pheasant tails have always worked for me. Sometimes you have to work a pool over and make sure you hit every lane. If it looks like it holds fish it probably does so use that to figure out what bugs are working and were the fish are holding at, then you will have fish all day. Also try and hook up with someone on the forums to take you out you will learn a ton! Tight lines!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. Scottyp - you rock. I have definitely been focusing on the wrong areas. I will go and scout out some new spots and let you know if I get into something larger.
 

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Visser,

Fish the entire river and you will start to figure out where the fish are at. Most people walk right past most of the good fishing when going straight to their honey hole. I have hooked into some of my nicest fish in the unlikeliest of places.

Good Luck
 
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