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I almost always catch more fish with a spinning pole tossing hardware than with my fly pole. But I probably enjoy catching fish on me fly pole better.

I keep thinking I should just pick one pole and just use it all the time.

If that is the case then should I go for the pole that's easier to use and that catches more fish or should I go for the pole that makes me feel better about using?

Is the pole you use really that important or is catching fish the real reason we go fishing?

What do you guys think?
 

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I can only speak for myself. I enjoy fly fishing more than with my spinning pole, but I keep them both around. When I take the kids out, I want to catch fish -and I don't want that dependent upon matching the right hatch, or my fly being a size too small or too large, or the wrong color. I want the kids to catch - so we use the zebco, worms or powerbait, and we catch fish. Right now I'm trying to find a day to hit the hard water with the kids. But when I fish for my mental conditions, I fly fish. And some days I get snobby and fish my split cane rod only for native trout, using only a royal coachman, and I spend as much time watching the wild flowers, for deer or elk, or try to figure out why the ants always move to the right of the big rock I put in thier path back to the ant pile. Other fly fishing days I will go nymph bouncing (as my fishing buddy says 'might as well be dunkin' worms out there')

I guess my point is - don't give up either. Do what works for you - Fishing has nothing to do with others' perceptions - only the mental help it offers the angler. If you get that tossing spinner baits from a bass boat, good for you. If you like sitting in your lawn chair with a 6-pack tossing out stinkbaits to catfish, great. If you'd rather swing a fly rod for trout, excellent. If you can do all three in one day and enjoy them, go for it.
 

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No answer for that question- it's a personal preference. I can say I have had incredibly enjoyable times with a spinning rod- I also can say I haven't fished with one more 10 times since 1980. It's your boat that's being floated not ours.
 

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But, using a fly rod will make you a better person... :mrgreen: _(O)_
 

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peacefish said:
I almost always catch more fish with a spinning pole tossing hardware than with my fly pole. But I probably enjoy catching fish on me fly pole better.

I keep thinking I should just pick one pole and just use it all the time.

If that is the case then should I go for the pole that's easier to use and that catches more fish or should I go for the pole that makes me feel better about using?

Is the pole you use really that important or is catching fish the real reason we go fishing?

What do you guys think?
I had a similar dilemma years back. I made the switch to fly rod only, and it forced me to get better with it. The first year that I really felt comfortable with the fly rod, I caught more fish than I had caught for a LONG time. There is something about being able to mimic the natural food of fish.

What techniques are you using with the fly rod, and where are you fishing?
 

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Just use a fly rod and when you get a notion to use spinning gear, strap on a spinning reel. Small reels would probably work better, but thats up to you. I fished with an old guy last year who strapped a spinning reel to his fly rod and drifted plastics and bait (not that this is for everyone) for browns with it. He did really well and actually had a heck of a fight on his hands when he hooked into a nice brown. Seems like his casting distance was kinda limited because of the small guides on the rod, but if you're on a river, it won't matter that much because you don't have to cast a mile to get the job done. Anyway... my two cents on it.
 

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I would just use the spinning outfit. On a river you can use white and black jigs and catch fish in the deep holes where the fly fishers can't. Then rub it in.
 

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First off, you must stop insulting your fly "rod" by calling it a pole, then as an un offended object it will automatically begin catching more fish :D . I am with Cheech, a few years ago I decided I would stick completely with my fly rod no matter what, now I catch more fish consistently with my fly rod. I will still get the old "pole" out and throw some rapalas and spinners on a lake but my love is for fly fishing. I have found it more challenging, time consuming, frustrating, impossible, but for me the greater the challenge the funner the prize (I would always rather catch a 14 in fish on my fly rod than an 18 inch fish on my fishing pole). My 2 cent thought.
 

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peacefish said:
I almost always catch more fish with a spinning pole tossing hardware than with my fly pole. But I probably enjoy catching fish on me fly pole better.

I keep thinking I should just pick one pole and just use it all the time.
This dilema seems to crop up on a lot of us (myself included) at one time or another. I started out fishing with bait, then moved on to spinners. When I got my first fly rod, it was very frustrating because I was getting skunked. I was used to catching a lot of fish using bait and spinners. It was hard for me to enjoy fishing with out catching fish. At the time, catching fish is where I got my satisfaction.

I enjoyed the action and concept of a fly rod, but I wanted to catch fish and fish were very hard to come by when I used a fly rod. So when I did go fishing, I would start out with my fly rod for about an hour or so. If I didn't have any success, which was usually the case, then I would break out my spin rod and catch fish pretty quick to get my fix.

After awhile, spin fishing just sort of got boring for me, not really sure why. It just did. This is when I finally decided to leave the spin gear home and give fly fishing a true shot. I haven't looked back since.

I now can catch a lot more fish on a consistent basis than I ever did with a spin rod. The one difference I have noticed, is with a spin rod I would usually catch 3-4 fish out of a hole at most before I had to move on. With a fly rod, I can catch 10+ (not always the case, but happens a lot) out of the same hole before I have to move on, sometimes more.

It doesn't really matter what you choose, just do what comes natural and what you enjoy the most. It could go either way as far as deciding to fly fish or spin fish. There is nothing wrong with doing both either. :wink:

Catching fish with a fly rod will come if you give it a chance. Just keep in mind, you have to fly fish a lot, just like anything else in life, to get good at it.

Good Luck
 

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It is up to you but this is my philosphy on moving water I fly-fish. I don't care if it is dries, nymphs, or streamers whatever the meathod that is working. I prefer the big terestrials with a nymph dropper that is my most favorite form of fly fishing. On the lakes I use mainly a spinning rod with hardware or fly and a bubble. I did manage to get my fist stillwater trout on a fly rod last year and plan on trying it out more this year as well. Have fun and don't worry about it, the best way to learn is to PM some of the guys on the forum and go out fishing with them!
 

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I can only speak for myself and my own personal preferences. My experience leads me to believe that an experienced fly fisherman will catch many, many more fish than a spin fishermen under typical condititions. I had to make the decision to learn the art, and put down my spinning rod at age 16. Honestly, I didn't catch all that many fish during my first fly-only season. My tying and presentation skills made massive progress because I was committed to learning during that season, however.

Spin fishing presents lures that are generalized. Minnows, worms, and other targets of opportunity. This will get some opportunistic fish. Flies can target the exact naturally occurring food that fish are interested in on that day, at that hour, in that specific place. Because of the ability to accurately target a natural food and present it just like the natural, odds go up across the board.

Definitely do what you like best and have fun with. I catch 3 or 4 times the numbers of fish on a fly than I typically can with a spinning rig (but it may just be that I suck with the spin).
 

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It's not that hard to fly fish. I can't believe these fly fishers who say "It's an art. Hang in there and you will eventually become a master." HOGWASH! Go out with a few soft hackle flies or muddler minnows and cast down and across stream. let them swing in the current and then slowly strip them back upstream. Don't worry about upstream casts and dead drifts yet. Just cast down on a tight line and strip the fly back with slow shoert strips. Watch for hits as the line swings in the current and lift the rod tip when you feel a tug. You'll hook a few and you'll miss a few. You'll get used to how the rod casts and how the line behaves on the water. Work each hole then move down to the next. After a while try some upstream casts and don't worry about catching fish at first. Watch how the line floats and how the currents drag it, then try to cast and mend to stop the line from dragging so quick. It's fun. Just go out and do it. I was catching a bunch of trout on wet flies when I was 13. It's a good way to learn and then you can advance from there.

The above technique works best when the temperatures are getting warmer. Trout are harder to catch in the winter in rivers. It's just the way they are.
 

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In anything that you do it's the "intensity" factor degree that you put into it that makes you better--------- at anything. If fish to just fish no matter what type you will be OK at it. If you put in the dedication in all aspects of that you will be very good at it.
 

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Late to the party as usual, but here goes. When I fish/hike the Uintas, I carry both a fly rod and spinning rod. I can cover more water (and further out, too) with a spinning rod (I don't hike in a tube or bring waders). If the fish are visible within casting range, I'll use the fly rod. Sometimes I alternate rods if the action is really fast (doesn't happen too often, though).
 
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