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I just spent all day yesterday in the field in a very hot yote area (not to give anyone's hot spot away) and no yotes. This particular area has been very succesful for one of Doyle Moss' own guides, so a guy that knows his way around the field; he got 20+ here last year. It is an area that does not get the pressure as it is several hours from SLC; I hit 3 different spots, saw some tracks and rabbits around; two were within 1/2 mile of the highway and one was miles from any improved road. I have also spent time in two other areas also known to hold the dogs, but have much more pressure. Anyways, no yotes have responded yet. I have invested in a new Savage in .223, binocs, a Hunter Specialties remote call, Hot Dog, KiYi, and other calls (never using more than 2-3 per spot). I have started with the remote call under the cottontail call on a pretty quiet setting, only calling after sitting for at least 5 minutes. Full camo, quiet approach, holding perfectly still with shooting sticks, etc. I have watched numerous predator videos and I think I have the wind down and site selection down somewhat.

Where I ask for your input is: what errors did you find yourself experiencing early on? What are common mistakes that you see? I am simply trying to improve and can't specifically think of what I may be overlooking, any of your insight would be appreciated. PM's are welcome if you prefer. Thanks in advance!

I see that this guy is often very succesful, but I just can't grow the mullet in my line of work, will a wig fool them?
I definitely like the asthetic aspects of the mullet and apparently the yotes do too; I just can't convince the boss.
 

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Most coyote hunters are not sneaky enough. You have to close vehicle doors quietly. You have to hide the vehicle so coyotes do not see it (very important). Be still and just move your eyes as you look around. Coyotes have very good senses: sight, hearing and smell. Try going on a weekday instead of a weekend. If there has been a coyote contest in the area, they really seem to stir the coyotes up and it is harder to call them in. Try to keep anything reflective to a minimum including the lenses on binoculars. Flashes of reflection from lenses, scopes, barrels can alert coyotes that something is up. I have not had the same luck with electronic calls as others seem to have. Mouth calls have worked great for me. I have waited up to an hour in a spot before I have had action. Some coyote hunters don't have the patience to sit that long and will leave after 15 to 20 minutes. Some of my best stands have taken an hour for coyotes to show up. I will only wait that long if I know I'm in a real good area and know I have done everything right to get into position. Sound carries a long ways in some spots so sometimes you move more than a mile or two to the next spot. Terrain will help dictate where the next spot for a call should be. Just some of my thoughts.
 

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No coyotes in 3 stands is nothing to complain about. You may go 20 or maybe more before you call one in. Especially this time of year. There has been probably 8-10 contests already. There is not a spot in Utah that is not hit hard. You would be amazed how many people are trying to call them. Any coyotes out there alive this time of year are going to be call shy.

What are you using the binocs for. If you are using them on a stand you are making to much movement. If you are using them after you are done calling, you are educating the coyotes. You need to sneak in and sneak out. There are only a few of the coyote video makers that are even worth watching. A lot of them are nothing but bad info and bad videos made like the stupid white tail deer videos.

I called for a year before I called in my first coyote. When I go out I make about 12 stands a day. The guy in the youtube link you have, his name is Tim and he has been hunting them for a long time. His hunting partners name is Dave. They are in the Salt Lake area and have several videos out about shoot prairie dogs and rock chucks. They just did a coyote video. They are some real nice people.
 

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Great tips there, listen to them.

Persistance and patience is what I recommend.

I went out last weekend and made seven stands in good yote country, never saw another hunter and fresh yote sign everywhere. Hunted all day and felt like I did everything right, camo, wind, concealing the truck, calling, ect, ect. Each stand was just over 30 minutes and nothing came into site.

I'm not going to give up though........ It's good just to be out huntin', sooner or later they'll come in, it's just a matter of time.

sawsman
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys that is all very helpful; good to know that it is not uncommon to not see any. Any particular time of day better than others? What types of calls to you use?
 

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Most of the information is good. I consider myself to be at least an average coyote hunter. I spent the whole day out yeaterday (Thursday), and never killed a dog. They have been hunted hard. The responses I got where just "We're not coming" barks and howls. When we first started, it was 2 seasons before we actually called one into gun range. Now we usually average on dog every 3 to 5 stands, with the exception days when you can do nothing wrong.
I think the biggest thing is getting into position. Hide the vehicle, don't worry about other moving vehicles.
Coyotes will stand and watch them go by. Be very aware of how much noise you make going in, and how much of the countyside has already seen you. Make sure your clothes are soft, and walk about the same speed as a cow. It doesn't do any good to go a long ways from the truck, as long as its hidden. Walking several hundred yards on crunchy snow does the same thing as driving to your spot. Besides, dragging back dogs that far is a bummer. Set up where you can slip in, preferrably over a small barrier, like a railroad, or sand hill.
Every stand you make, a predator hears you. One thing to really master is the howling. Learn what they are saying. You will get so that you know when to pick up your gun, or go back to the truck. One last thing, everyone calls to much.[attachment=0:3sdx0ati]coyotes2.jpg[/attachment:3sdx0ati]
 

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Sweet success!

That looks like some pretty flat land. How'd ya hide the vehicle?

I remembeer when hardly anyone hunted coyotes. Now, they get edjumacated pretty fast.

We've had good and bad days with the howlers too. When we first started howling it was like a light switch went on. I think there are a bunch of guys out blowing howlers the wrong way too. Seems to be difficult to get the same success.

It's just my opinion, but I really hate those contests. It makes it difficult to hit areas where the coyotes haven't been messed with. That may be the biggest secret and tip of all time: find a place where the buggers haven't been called, set up right and I think you'll find success.
 

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The truck was in the borrow pit next to the road, behind that small hill.
I don't mind contests, have never participated, but don't care if someone else does.
The nice thing about coyotesa is there is always a new batch next year. :?
 

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Cool. Thanks for sharing. You going to skin em out and cut up in little patches and sell them to Troutsmen Enterprises?

Could you give more details about how you called them. Maybe PM if you don't want to broadcast it. Thanks!
 
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