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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been exploring a bit about CWMU's, but had a few questions. Looks like most of them have only a handful of tags available, so I assume draw odds for those are way low. I know the tag fee is more on CWMUs, but do the landowners charge on top of that? I seem to have heard of people paying thousands to hunt CWMUs, but I wasn't sure if that was because they purchased tags directly from the landowner. Any insight from those who've drawn a CWMU tag would be appreciated!
 

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The tag fees are the same as regular tag fees.
Resident hunters who draw a CWMU tag are only required to pay for tag. A CWMU may suggest a guide and that would be a separate fee.
Resident or non residents who purchase a permit from the CWMU operator pay what ever the operator requires plus the normal tag fee. Which can amount to thousands of dollars.

While there are basic rules a CWMU must follow, all are not operated equally. Do your homework before applying.
 

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I've been exploring a bit about CWMU's, but had a few questions. Looks like most of them have only a handful of tags available, so I assume draw odds for those are way low. I know the tag fee is more on CWMUs, but do the landowners charge on top of that? I seem to have heard of people paying thousands to hunt CWMUs, but I wasn't sure if that was because they purchased tags directly from the landowner. Any insight from those who've drawn a CWMU tag would be appreciated!
ALL CWMU's operate under a tag split with the state for the public drawing. Some splits are 90/10, 80/20, or 70/30 (the higher number of the split goes to the CWMU). Some splits include all the antlerless tags being given to the state, in exchange for some additional antlered tags going to the landowner/CWMU operator to sale/donate.

Some CWMU's offer a guiding service for free and others charge for it. I've had numerous CWMU tags in the past and think the program is wonderful. I'll continue putting in for CWMU tags in the future!!

Are there any other specific questions you have about the program?
 

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As middlefork mentioned do your homework on a CWMU if you are thinking of applying to one. Some restrict the number of helpers that you can have along with access times, vehicles, and areas to hunt and other restrictions.
 

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A few highlights pertaining to public draw hunters-
-A CWMU can not require the public draw hunter to pay for guide services or packing services. The CWMU can offer those services for a fee, but not require them. (CWMUs that require a guide should not expect tipping or reimbursement.)
-A CWMU must give the buck/bull hunters a minimum of 5 days and antlerless tag holders a minimum of 3 days, not including Sundays as one of the 5 or 3 days.
-CWMUs can restrict guests of the hunter.
-CWMUs can restrict modes of travel and close access roads- but they can not close areas of the CWMU to the public hunter unless those areas are designated as closed to all hunters on a map filed with the UDWR.
-CWMUs do not need to allow access to the CWMU prior to the hunt.

My personal opinion- There are great CWMUs and poor CWMUs. I'd steer clear of any CWMU that won't allow guests or that have harsh mode-of-transportation restrictions. The CWMU program is an overall positive. There are some areas that need to be improved. Unless one has some inside information or really does their homework, CWMU hunts can be a gamble.
 

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As has been stated, do your homework. There are some good CWMU's out there, and there are some terrible ones. CWMU's make their $$$ through their private tags that they sell. The public hunter is typically an inconvenience for a CWMU. Although most CWMU's are smart enough to know that if they don't take care of the public hunters, there can be consequences. I've hunted decent CWMU's that were fair, and I have some that were an absolute joke. Some of the cons of having a CWMU tag are: Typically no pre-season scouting. A limited number of people you can bring with you (sometimes that's only 1 person), sometimes no ATV use. You're at their mercy on where they tell you to go hunt. Some don't allow you to camp on their property. Your days to hunt may be fewer. Not all CWMU's are created equal so like has been said, do your homework.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ALL CWMU's operate under a tag split with the state for the public drawing. Some splits are 90/10, 80/20, or 70/30 (the higher number of the split goes to the CWMU). Some splits include all the antlerless tags being given to the state, in exchange for some additional antlered tags going to the landowner/CWMU operator to sale/donate.

Some CWMU's offer a guiding service for free and others charge for it. I've had numerous CWMU tags in the past and think the program is wonderful. I'll continue putting in for CWMU tags in the future!!

Are there any other specific questions you have about the program?
Great information. I didn't see it in the proclamation, but I assume a CWMU bull elk application would count as your LE app? And if so, if you're unsuccessful do you get a point?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A few highlights pertaining to public draw hunters-
-A CWMU can not require the public draw hunter to pay for guide services or packing services. The CWMU can offer those services for a fee, but not require them. (CWMUs that require a guide should not expect tipping or reimbursement.)
-A CWMU must give the buck/bull hunters a minimum of 5 days and antlerless tag holders a minimum of 3 days, not including Sundays as one of the 5 or 3 days.
-CWMUs can restrict guests of the hunter.
-CWMUs can restrict modes of travel and close access roads- but they can not close areas of the CWMU to the public hunter unless those areas are designated as closed to all hunters on a map filed with the UDWR.
-CWMUs do not need to allow access to the CWMU prior to the hunt.

My personal opinion- There are great CWMUs and poor CWMUs. I'd steer clear of any CWMU that won't allow guests or that have harsh mode-of-transportation restrictions. The CWMU program is an overall positive. There are some areas that need to be improved. Unless one has some inside information or really does their homework, CWMU hunts can be a gamble.
Very good feedback. Thank you! Any other tips on discerning between good or bad CWMUs? Looks like the Hunt Planner has some notes, so that helps.
 

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As many others have said, there's good ones, and not so good ones. Hunters that use those that don't turn out so well in that the operator doesn't respond or give them much for dates, etc should be reported to the CWMU board.

Some operators are really good to work with and will provide you general information about good spots to look for deer or elk. One thing I would suggest if drawing a permit is to offer the operator help in posting signs, or repairing fences, or even providing security patrol during other hunts. I know there's many that'll take that offer. This helps you to learn the ground a little more. Since you pretty much won't be able to scout, this would give a person an advantage. A friend of mine drew an elk tag on a CWMU near Heber. The operator was little to no help. More or less directed him away from where they killed most of their bulls. Once he discovered that area he got his elk but it was basically day 5 in the evening.

I am familiar with a few CWMUs and would hunt them knowing the operator. But as mentioned in about every post, just do your homework.
 

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Great information. I didn't see it in the proclamation, but I assume a CWMU bull elk application would count as your LE app? And if so, if you're unsuccessful do you get a point?
Yes, CWMU tags are considered a limited entry tag. As such, any CWMU tag that you draw would eliminate your points. If you are unsuccessful in the drawing, you will get a point.
 

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I encourage public hunters who feel mistreated by a CWMU to contact the UDWR and file a complaint. The CWMU Committee then reviews complaints and attempts to make the program and offending CWMUs better. The only way the program gets better is to shine a light on the problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes, CWMU tags are considered a limited entry tag. As such, any CWMU tag that you draw would eliminate your points. If you are unsuccessful in the drawing, you will get a point.
Good to know. Looks like success rates are much higher on CWMUs, but not sure if that's taking into account ALL hunts there or just the ones in the draw. Things to ponder!
 

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Good to know. Looks like success rates are much higher on CWMUs, but not sure if that's taking into account ALL hunts there or just the ones in the draw. Things to ponder!
The success rates take into consideration all hunts. For example, EB3514 Deseret Bull Elk shows 17 tags available to the public via the drawing and 106 permits total when looking at the 2020 Harvest Report. Lots and lots of information out there to make an informed decision nowadays!
 

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$15,000 for a few days to hunt a Bull Elk basically in a Zoo...... 🤦🏼‍♂️ Chasing Wildlife onto private land is a lucrative business now a daze.
 

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$15,000 for a few days to hunt a Bull Elk basically in a Zoo...... 🤦🏼‍♂️ Chasing Wildlife onto private land is a lucrative business now a daze.
If you have any proof of operators chasing wildlife onto the private I am sure that the DWR would love to see the video. Now days when everyone has a camera in their pocket evidence should be easy to come up with.
 

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A quick example (most everything having been explained above). I have drawn 2 CWMU tags east if Duchesne for antelope (1 buck / 1 doe). Great hunt, great operator, lots of animals. My son drew a CWMU west of Cedar City for doe antelope. Friendly operator, almost no antelope on the property, kinda lame hunt. Operator did nothing wrong, but I would never hunt speed goats out there again. To be fair, odds were about 50/50 on harvest, which is low for antelope IMO. I should have followed the harvest statistics and loomed elsewhere. It took 0 points to draw, so not out any points, but between tag, gas, food etc., it was a $350 hole blown in my wallet. Won't make the same mistake twice. Look at those harvest stats. They can be an indicator of what to expect on your hunt!
 

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I've only had 2 antlerless cwmu hunts. One elk and one antelope. Both allowed 2 days to hunt and both only took a morning. They were great experiences and I even got to bring the family on the antelope hunt. In hindsight I'd do both again any day if I had points available. Unfortunately antlerless elk (general draw) has been a 1 year waiting period every season for me due to draw odds pushing the points creep.

I've been thinking of burning some bull elk points in one for a couple reasons. I've often thought a low pressure hunt near the rut would be fun. Not having much interest in antlers, I'm after a good experience within a mile of a road that results in meat for the freezer. Now I could be way off on how a cwmu bull hunt is in reality but that's my impression. It could be high pressure and nowhere near the rut since the operator controls the dates and gives preference to the client I'm sure.

Anyhow, study draw odds and success rates. It'll give you a good idea if you can draw bases on your points. From there you can research the cwmu on the hunt planner and here. Good ones won't have much bad publicity and tougher draw odds.
 
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