Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I work with a bunch of crazy but talented kids. I head a marketing division of a company and since I'm the most senior aboard (don't ask my age) I'm basically in charge of disciplining them aside from supervising them. I took a supervisory training specifically for this position but I feel like sometimes being with this "bunch" brings so much stress to me. 5 ESSENTIAL STEPS TO RESOLVE A CONFLICT AT WORK this was a nice read though. I wonder if there are tools available that would help me deal with conflicts in the workplace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
Serena

I am by no means an expert, but in the past when I supervised those who were a dozen years less or even half my age, I found that 1) focus on what productive skills they can bring to the table, and 2) give them freedom to do their jobs, but remind them that at the same time there are expectations and objectives to perform.

As far as conflicts, I would interview each involved to find out the different sides of the stories (the truth is always in the middle between two stories), then let them sit together (you observing) and let them hash it out. You always have a right to face your accuser (usually a conflict is one pitting against another). Most conflicts are a result of mixed messages and interpreting something different than what was intended. Most of the times, a conflict occurs without the "guilty" party even knowing they caused something.

Also, tact and professionalism are key to communicating to those you supervise. One of the worse things I've seen supervisors do is dance around the issue because they are afraid of confrontations. Be blunt, but be polite. I've also learned that being condescending or playing part in a "parent/child" lecture environment is going to just harbor bad feelings and present the basis for future issues. I would focus on the positive they provide first, then walk into the issue at hand.

The days of "don't mess with the boss" and "if you can't figure it out, your replacement will" threats are over. It costs a business way too much money to replace employees through hiring, training, etc to just cycle through personnel, so businesses have embraced the concept of long term investment in people. Now, the saying "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink" certainly applies and sometimes letting someone go or administering formal discipline has its application, but only as a last result.
 

·
Bjorne Lou Tsar
Joined
·
3,341 Posts
Serena

I am by no means an expert, but in the past when I supervised those who were a dozen years less or even half my age, I found that 1) focus on what productive skills they can bring to the table, and 2) give them freedom to do their jobs, but remind them that at the same time there are expectations and objectives to perform.

As far as conflicts, I would interview each involved to find out the different sides of the stories (the truth is always in the middle between two stories), then let them sit together (you observing) and let them hash it out. You always have a right to face your accuser (usually a conflict is one pitting against another). Most conflicts are a result of mixed messages and interpreting something different than what was intended. Most of the times, a conflict occurs without the "guilty" party even knowing they caused something.

Also, tact and professionalism are key to communicating to those you supervise. One of the worse things I've seen supervisors do is dance around the issue because they are afraid of confrontations. Be blunt, but be polite. I've also learned that being condescending or playing part in a "parent/child" lecture environment is going to just harbor bad feelings and present the basis for future issues. I would focus on the positive they provide first, then walk into the issue at hand.

The days of "don't mess with the boss" and "if you can't figure it out, your replacement will" threats are over. It costs a business way too much money to replace employees through hiring, training, etc to just cycle through personnel, so businesses have embraced the concept of long term investment in people. Now, the saying "you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink" certainly applies and sometimes letting someone go or administering formal discipline has its application, but only as a last result.
I agree with HighDesertElk. Apparently, he has some experience here. I highlighted what I thought were some key points and would like to add that if you do set two employees together, you must be a careful arbitrator. Keep the meeting going in the right direction and let each person say how they feel without letting it turn into an argument.
Good luck.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,248 Posts
Having been in management for many years before I retired (I think Im retired?)I had the great fortune-O,- to have problem employees sent to my store.These folks were on there last legs, and 1 step away from being fired.I was able to turn about 75% of them into productive workers(the other 25% really were the wrong person for the job)One of the key things I did was to gain their respect and let them know they were of value to the company, I think one of the best plans I had was to let them know that there were no bad ideas and to come to me if they had any Ideas, well some of the greatest success in my sales came from these folks who were ready to kick horse turds down the road when they were brought to me, I'm not saying it will work for all but if I only lose 25% of the problems then I consider that a success.(But thank the Lord I don't have to do it again.:mrgreen:)These folks that had a problem with others and work seemed to come together and most of my conflicts were done.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top