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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all what does the written test look like these days? My daughter did the online portion earlier this year and needs to do the field day. I'm not worried about the shooting test or demonstrating safety but don't know how much she needs to remember for the written test.
 

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My boys took the online course about 18 months ago. We had to send videos of our live-fire exercise. The written was multiple-choice done over a video call with the instructor. I was VERY nervous given the young age of my boys, their lack of attention/focus, and the fact that it ended up being several month between their studies and actual test. The all passed on the first try. I was also impressed with the instructor. He was happy to help talk the kids through questions they were unsure of and I know he went back and helped a few of the other kids who didn't pass to make another attempt and get it done. He was adamant that the goal was to get kids passed, not failed. I guess that's really long-winded and doesn't directly answer your question. I guess I'm just trying to say do some general review with her before the exam and she'll do fine.
 

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My son just went through his field day last month. Our instructor made sure that all attendees passed. In fact, a lot of the parents helped their kids out a little as they were going through it. It is a low pressure deal and all the info will be covered during the field day for the actual test.
 

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The field day has the “classroom” section, and it seems most instructors cover everything that appears on the test at that time. That’s after the online part.
As long as she shows a little interest in the subject, she shouldn’t have any trouble passing.
 

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I get "helping the kids out" but, it seems after reading what takes place in today's time, it's almost a "give me" type of thing now. When I took Hunters Safety (I think it was in 1974) if you didn't pay attention in the class and do your homework, it could be tuff. About 25% of the class didn't pass the final exam and close to that when the shooting took place.

The final exam was given, and if you passed, you moved out to the range the same day. It sure was a great time I know that! Do they still have the kids shoot the squirrel target for shooting proficiency anymore? I heard they did away with that.
 

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I get "helping the kids out" but, it seems after reading what takes place in today's time, it's almost a "give me" type of thing now. When I took Hunters Safety (I think it was in 1974) if you didn't pay attention in the class and do your homework, it could be tuff. About 25% of the class didn't pass the final exam and close to that when the shooting took place.

The final exam was given, and if you passed, you moved out to the range the same day. It sure was a great time I know that! Do they still have the kids shoot the squirrel target for shooting proficiency anymore? I heard they did away with that.
That's the way that I did it in the mid 60's, the kids actually learned something and had something to look forward to. I don't remember a single parent in the class and the only adults were the instructors.

Now the range day was different, a number of parents showed up to help their kids shoot.

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That's the way that I did it in the mid 60's, the kids actually learned something and had something to look forward to. I don't remember a single parent in the class and the only adults were the instructors.
EXACTLY! I remember the classroom had mostly "kids". If there were adults, they were taking the course.

Maybe the course curriculum now is to have the parent involved in helping the "kid" understand the safety side of things? I've seen a few Adults in the woods that needed to retake the course to understand a few of the rules and safety. 🙄
 

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My boys took the online course about 18 months ago. We had to send videos of our live-fire exercise. The written was multiple-choice done over a video call with the instructor. I was VERY nervous given the young age of my boys, their lack of attention/focus, and the fact that it ended up being several month between their studies and actual test. The all passed on the first try. I was also impressed with the instructor. He was happy to help talk the kids through questions they were unsure of and I know he went back and helped a few of the other kids who didn't pass to make another attempt and get it done. He was adamant that the goal was to get kids passed, not failed. I guess that's really long-winded and doesn't directly answer your question. I guess I'm just trying to say do some general review with her before the exam and she'll do fine.
This is my exact experience as well with my son last year.

In response to some of you "boomers" ;) - as a parent, it's my responsibility to teach my children first. Gun safety should start long before a hunter's education class . . .
 

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My son took the course earlier this year. I sat through the classes with him and he had no problem with the final exam. It's pretty basic stuff.

When I took the course in the 80's all of my friends dad's were present as well. I'm with CPAjeff...it's not someone else's responsibility to teach gun safety to my kids. I learned far more from my dad and others while in the field than I did during the course. It ought to be the same for my kids.
 

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Gun safety should be taught to your children as soon as they are able to understand the responsibilities of having a firearm in their possession.

I was taught this at a very young age around 4 or 5 years old. I knew where my dad kept the rifles and ammo, but I also knew what would happen to me if I would of ever touched one of them without one of my parents present.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks guys just what I was looking for. I know when I got my hunter safety my dad said he would be the one to judge if I was responsible enough to go hunting. This is how it will be for my daughter too. But she is showing an interest now and want to build on that now before other activities distract her. I also want to be ready to start buying her points asap for later in life.
 
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