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So I was just wondering if you are hunting Big Game, lets say Deer or Elk. You then see a bear, mtn lion, or even wolves. What do you do? Aside from pulling out the camera and taking a picture, or running for you life. I mean do you leave and hunt somewhere else. Or is this a sign to you that you are in the right area. Part of me believes that if the predator is there the animals are there. But I also believe that once those animals catch wind of the predator, they will be out of there. So what would you do? Keep hunting the same area or leave?
 

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3 - s - code
 

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I'd keep hunting. Also, if I were undetected by the predator, I might be tempted to follow him. He likely knows where the game is located better than I. But, you know, from a safe distance. :D
 

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keep hunting take pics and have the safty off just incase they wanted me for lunch or dinner. then thye could have my bullet for there dinner. :lol:
 

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Personally, I'd take pictures with my BRAND NEW CAMERA!!! YAHOOOOOOO!!! Other than myself, I've heard guys say put an arrow in em and leave it alone. :shock: I'm not at all sure thats the right option but it is a sentiment I've heard more than once. Its not my bag but I think I'd certainly keep hunting the area.
 

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My experience with wolves is that when they're in town the deer and elk quietly move out. This happened on our archery elk hunt last year in wyoming while we were hunting the greys river drainage. I also spoke with a couple of outfitters which felt the same, they also said the bulls that were left would come in quietly and it was tough to get a shot.
 

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Due to certain biological factors, the predators could be a mixed blessing.

As a general rule, most predators (wolves, Mtn. lions, coyotes, etc.) only prey upon the weak, sick, and young. Unless they are terribly stressed or malnourished, they may attack critters out of their league. Thus, keep a few things in mind:

1. Following the predator will generally lead you to an undesirable kill- a fawn, a sick bull, or an arrow-injured deer. Following just makes it more difficult for the predator to score.

2. Mature bulls and bucks seldom pay predators much mind. They will slip away quietly, on full alert, but they will be back- particularly if their reproductive season is in full swing. Often, you may want to circle down-wind of stands of nasty, impenetrable cover, even if it's a small patch. When the threat has passed, they'll generally come out and go about their business as usual. Be patient.

3. Predators in the area is usually a sign of a fairly unhealthy herd. Good hunting to a lion or black bear generally means their prey, i.e.; the same critters you're chasing, are tired, malnourished or otherwise anemic. predators won't risk burning too many calories this time of year unless it's more or less a sure thing. Their diet and hunting methods are directly related to building fat stores for the leaner months.

4. Be careful dragging out your deer. If you HAVE TO hang it overnight, keep it away from the tree trunk. Also, it should be at least six feet off the ground. Bears and coyotes are your main concern here.

5. Remember- a 165 lb Bi-ped is by far the easiest prey to a lion.
If you're in the area, you're on the menu.

6. Take notes, picture, etc. Go buy a Harvest Objective permit for the area. With your extended archery deer and elk tags, you now have a chance for a Grand Slam. Leaving a gut pile is not considered baiting in the state of Utah. Good luck!
 

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As a general rule, most predators (wolves, Mtn. lions, coyotes, etc.) only prey upon the weak, sick, and young. Unless they are terribly stressed or malnourished, they may attack critters out of their league. Thus, keep a few things in mind:

1. Following the predator will generally lead you to an undesirable kill- a fawn, a sick bull, or an arrow-injured deer. Following just makes it more difficult for the predator to score.
I just knew wolves and lions love the taste of CWD deer. :lol: :lol: :lol:

There isnt enough sick animals in the herd to feed a pack of wolves. If they had to wait until a deer or elk got sick they would starve to death. I would be willing to bet that 85% of a wolf's diet is from eating healthy animals. I watched a thing about Yellowstone the other day and wolves were killing mature bull elk because after the rutting season a lot of bulls are worn out and they are easier prey.
 

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The emphasis of my post was on the presence of YOUNG cervids. Sorry if I didn't make that clear. The likelihood of a herd of animals having sufficient sick or old animals to support a burgeoning predator population is quite low, obviously- but if you factor in the presence of yearlings, that's a whole different story.

As for the footage you saw of Yellowstone wolves preying upon healthy elk is a bit of a geographic anomaly.
Cervids (elk and deer) within the park have, for many years, been carriers of a congenital disease that prevents them from carrying fawns and calves to full-term. Most of them spontaneously abort 4-6 months into their gestation period. Therefore, there are VERY few young deer and elk within the confines of the park. What young that do exist have migrated long distances with their parent herd.
Secondly, The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is too small to support the current wolf population within the park (hence, the whole Wolf Management dilemma). Wolves, up to this point, have adapted by allowing more wolves into their packs. Instead of the typical 4-7 wolves, these packs are comprised of 7-12 animls.
This has become increasingly difficult for the wolves to sustain- so they force the extra members out, which must migrate to new terrirory or starve. Or attack game animals that they otherwise would never have considered prey to survive. That's why the units bordering Yellowstone are played out. Too many wolves, too little range, with insufficient fawn and calf numbers to sustain them. They look healthy; but these wolves are, in fact, starving.

But, the likelihood of encountering wolves while in the field is, at this moment, quite low. That may change in the future.
That's why I concentrated primarily on lions and black bears- they are the predators one is most likely to encounter in Utah's deer woods. If you see wolf spoor, you should contact the DWR.
 

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for many years, been carriers of a congenital disease that prevents them from carrying fawns and calves to full-term. Most of them spontaneously abort 4-6 months into their gestation period. Therefore, there are VERY few young deer and elk within the confines of the park. What young that do exist have migrated long distances with their parent herd.
Please post your info on cow elk dont being able to carry calves to term because of the congenital disease.

They look healthy; but these wolves are, in fact, starving
THIS IS THE FUNNIEST THING I HAVE HEARD TODAY!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:

New Report Examines the Effects of Wolves on Elk

CHEYENNE, March 23-A new report released today by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department takes a detailed look at the effects that wolves are having on elk populations in northwestern Wyoming. In the report, department biologists analyzed statewide elk population data from 1980 through 2005.

Wolf reintroduction began in 1995, when the federal government released 14 wolves in Yellowstone National Park. Wolf populations reached recovery goals established by the US Fish and Wildlife Service in 2002 and continue to grow. At the end of 2006, there were an estimated 36 packs in Wyoming, including 311 individual wolves.

To determine the impacts wolves are having on elk, biologists looked at trends in calf:cow ratios over a 26-year period, both in areas where wolf populations have been established and in areas where wolves are not present. Of the 21 elk herds included in the analysis, eight are currently occupied by wolves.

"We have seen a downward trend in many of Wyoming's elk herds over this 26-year period," said Wyoming Game and Fish Department Wildlife Chief Jay Lawson. "That trend is likely due to long-term drought and other habitat related factors. But in half of the herds occupied by wolves, we saw a significantly greater rate of decline after wolves were established compared to herds without wolves. We can't attribute that increased rate of decline to any factor other than wolves."

Biologists feel an elk herd's population can be maintained at objective and provide some hunter harvest when the ratio of calves to cows is around 25 to 100. Once ratios fall below 20:100 there is very little opportunity for hunting. Four elk herds in Wyoming with wolves present have dropped below 25 calves per 100 cows, and two of those herds are below 20 calves per 100 cows. All four herds had declining ratios before wolves were present, but the rate of decline increased significantly after wolves were established. Currently, the only elk herds in the state with recruitment rates that will not support hunting, or possibly even stable populations, are those with significant wolf predation.

"There are a lot of different factors affecting wildlife throughout the state, and wolves are a relatively recent addition to the challenges facing our elk," said Lawson. We're very concerned about the effects of wolves on the state's elk and reduced hunting opportunities for the public. This report helps us understand how wolves are contributing to changes in our elk herds. We also hope this data will provide us tools to work with federal agencies in charge of wolf management to minimize the effects of wolves on elk and elk hunting opportunities."
 

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As a general rule, most predators (wolves, Mtn. lions, coyotes, etc.) only prey upon the weak, sick, and young. Unless they are terribly stressed or malnourished, they may attack critters out of their league.
Another thing Sweeten is this......What animals are out of a wolves league? Wolf pack can range from 6 to 12 wolves or higher so they are very successful predators. Wolves kill moose and they are one of the biggest animals in North America. Lions kill elk and I have hunted lions for 20 years and I have come upon many lion/elk kills and one 6x6 bull that didnt appear to have an injury. The tom that killed him was a HUGE tom. Was this animal out of his league? Of course not.

Wolves in Yellowstone have also prey on yearling to 2 year old buffalo, but maybe as they were eating him they realized this meat was WAY out of their league.
 

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Fine, dude-
You're right. I'm wrong.
That's all you want to hear anyway.
I'm assuming you're one of those wolf-hating zealots with the bumper stickers. Shall we call them "anti-lupites" or "anti-canites". Which has a better ring?
 

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Fine, dude-
You're right. I'm wrong.
That's all you want to hear anyway
.

No I didnt want you to say that, but if you assist then I will take your word for it. :D

I'm assuming you're one of those wolf-hating zealots with the bumper stickers. Shall we call them "anti-lupites" or "anti-canites". Which has a better ring?
I dont know. Maybe you can tell me. You pick which one. :D
 
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