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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking of changing to Hornady FTX 225gr with 100 grains of Tripple 7 on my Omega. I have been using 250 gr Shockwave but I am out of bullets and have the Hornady bullets already.

I keep reading reviews about Shockwave bullets passing through without expanding. I have had this happen once but most of my kills have been pretty good with the shockwave. My groupings are pretty good with the Shockwave but I have read that Hordandy shoots well also.

Some say that 225 grain is too light for cow elk? Does 25 grain lighter really have that less energy especially considering the higher velocity?

Thanks for any suggestions and help. I have to decide quickly.
 

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I believe you have to have a 240 grain bullet for elk in Utah. I've 6 cow elk with the 250 grain. The last couple I had jacket separation. It killed with no problem. I've since changed to the Barnes 250 Grain T-EZ. No more picking bullet fragments of the meat.
 

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From the Field Game Regulation Guidebook:

•To hunt big game, you must use a lead or expanding bullet or projectile that’s at least 40 caliber in size.
•If you’re hunting deer or pronghorn, your bullet must be 130 grains or heavier, or your sabot must be 170 grains or heavier.
•If you’re hunting elk, moose, bison, bighorn sheep or mountain goats, you must use a 210-grain or heavier bullet, or a sabot bullet that’s at least 240 grains.

Unfortunately the 225gr FTX is below the required minimum for saboted bullet weight for cow elk.
 

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I've used the 240 grain and the 250 gr XTP for deer and elk. Accuracy was always better with the 250 in my muzzleloaders. The bullets preformed well; however, over-expansion was an issue just like the FTX. On elk, most of the bullets recovered lost about 35% of their weight. My loads were north of 1800 fps and I rarely shoot beyond 50 yards.
 

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I've used the 240 grain and the 250 gr XTP for deer and elk. Accuracy was always better with the 250 in my muzzleloaders. The bullets preformed well; however, over-expansion was an issue just like the FTX. On elk, most of the bullets recovered lost about 35% of their weight. My loads were north of 1800 fps and I rarely shoot beyond 50 yards.
Use the 300grn XTPs for elk. 250gr of any bullet type is on the low end for elk. Use 300s and I'll bet you never recover one, I certainly havent.

-DallanC
 

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Use the 300grn XTPs for elk. 250gr of any bullet type is on the low end for elk. Use 300s and I'll bet you never recover one, I certainly havent.

-DallanC
I also use the 300gr XTP-MAG exclusively now for both deer and elk however I have used the 250gr XTPs with good success in the past on deer.
 

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Here is a before and after shot of my 300 grain Thor bullet. It was recovered on the off side of my elk last year. Two others passed through completely.

I was shooting 90 grains of Buck Horn 209 and the shot was right at 120 yards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hunt Update:

240 Grain XTP's did the trick with devastating results! My son and my brother both shot bucks with XTP's and there was blood everywhere. Very accurate round. My son hit the heart and my brother double lunged his. I will stay with this round! An added bonus is they are very cheap compared to other fancy rounds.
 

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Awesome. Yea its the single best preforming round I've ever seen for smokepoles. As you said, devastating. I love it so much I bought a lifetimes worth of XTPs and Hornady Sabots. I just laugh anymore when I read people posting about chasing new bullet types / powders / primers etc etc. I'll stick with what "just works".


-DallanC
 
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