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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to the game/trail cam stuff. so far, i've just been setting up on a location where i know deer are grazing. Unfortunately, this location is a bit exposed with only a few mahogany trees to break the wind. because of that my settings are set to low sensitivity and longer time outs. I've seen a lot of deer parts, some critters and plenty of moving branches.

so my question is, am i using a poor location, poor settings or are all trail cams taking pics like these. fwiw, i have a covert mp6 and looking to add another less expensive model to check other locations.
 

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Look for an area like a trail leading into your meadow or a better spot without branches and bushes that are triggering your camera. Aim it towards the trail rather than perpendicular to it and you will get better pics of the whole animal as it approaches or walks away. Its kind of a trial by error to get just the right spot.
 

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You can always cut down a few branches to make a more clear shot. Also how many pics are you getting? Your memory card will hold a lot depending on how big it is. Maybe set your sensitivity a little higher so that your getting the whole deer, and just delete the photos of the wind.
 

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I find that less than half of the pictures on my cameras contain animals. The great majority are "false triggers." I would take that even further and say that probably 20-25% actually contain a reasonably clear image of an animal... and a small percentage of those pictures are bucks or bulls. From 500 images I might end up with 35 or 40 that I end up saving. It's still worth doing simply because of the anticipation of what could be in the next picture.

I get my best results when I place my camera so that it is north facing, this keeps the IR sensor out of direct sun the most and also eliminates the overexposed imiages at sunrise/sunset if the camera is pointed east or west.
Most guys, and most manufacturers, say to place the camera about 4 feet off the ground, but I've found that brush easily grows up over the summer and causes problems at that height. So a couple years back I started placing my cameras up higher (as high as I can comfortably get them... so about 8ft) and angle them slightly down onto the trail. It's just my opinion but I think that I get better full body images of animals with a camera up higher compared to about waist high (plus the elk don't mess with them as much).
 

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Sunrise and sunset will trigger the camera, so those are bad directions to face the camera. I like to put down a salt lick or something else to get them to stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks for all the tips. i will head out there next week and make some adjustments. for the last two months i've just been using the trial and error method in an easy access area where deer have been. i will dial that in and put them out to where i plan hunt some elk.
 

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I've found that placing mine at about waist height works out quite well. It also helps to have a water source or something to get them to slow down or stop. I of course end up with many empty frames or just pieces of an animal as it runs by, but I have received some pretty sweet shots as well.
 
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