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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone seen deer and/or elk browsing on Forage Kochia? If so, what times of the year did you notice the browsing happening the most? Just curious, since this introduced plant is receiving so much attention to being the plant that will save the western lands from the cheatgrass invasion. Supposably it has fire resistent properties, grazing value and drought tolerance.
 

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Great topic! I haven't noticed it much, personally. But there's a lot of hay growers talking about it and I'd suppose if a market develops, we'll be seeing it in the near future. I heard that a bunch of it was planted on the Nebo burn, but I don't know it for a fact. Maybe some of the guys here who were involved with that effort would know.

http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/j ... ia0106.htm
 

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Very interesting topic, thanks.

I found out just this fall there's some around Evanston where I sage-grouse hunt.
People were out picking the seed tops off of it.

I checked it out on the net; sounds like it's the #1 miracle weed.......ah....legal weed that is.

Gonna go out there rabbit hunting and check the stuff out, take some pictures, munch on some of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I would be interested to know if they used Forage Kochia seed on the Nebo burn and where. It would be interesting to see it's effects on the land from the beginning. It worries me that there seems to be a general attitude around that these hot summer forest fires are good for the land. From what I've seen and heard, if the fires are too hot and happening during the summer time, it's really hard for the native plants to grow back before the land is taken over by cheatgrass. Spring and Fall fires of low intensity seem to be the best fires for allowing native vegitation to grow back. My research into the plants have land managers resorting to using non-native plants, yet beneficial, for reseeding efforts on the hot fire burns because native plants can not compete with cheatgrass. Non-native or not, Forage Kochia, russian wildrye and some crested wheatgrass, to name a few, are better than a mountain full of cheatgrass. In my opinion cheatgrass, especially on winter range, is one of the major reasons for the low deer numbers. I only know of one game animal that benefits from cheatgrass....chuckar.....maybe that's why their numbers are increasing??
If anyone knows of any plantings near St. George, I'd be happy to know where.
 

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Wow, what a great article. I had never heard of that plant. It sounds like the perfect thing for everyone. Good for cattle, good for game birds, AND good for big game. The best part is that it "outcompetes" cheatgrass. I didn't think that was possible. How great that it's a Utah scientist doing all the work! I hope they have used it for seeding all the burns this year.

Thanks for the article. Great info! Great post!!
 

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Great post! Thanks for the heads up. Now, where can I get some seed? I know a couple of bare hillsides that could use some intervention before the cheat gets ahold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've heard Granite seed is who the DWR uses sometimes. You should check with the BLM, Forest, DWR or whoever owns the land your talking about throwing some seed on...they might not want to allow this certain plant in that area or may not want anybody throwing any kind of seed out period. The best thing we can do as interested citizens of the state/US is let our representatives and land stewards know that we support plants, even non native, that will combat the cheatgrass and maybe give them a heads up on certain areas we would like to see improved with seeding projects. If you have private land it should be fine to plant forage kochia on it because it is not one of the banned toxic weedy plants.
 
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