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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working up a handload, but am concerned w/ safety/case life:

I'd invest in a chronograph, but I'm getting married soon, not in the budget!

I'm loading a pet .30-30 load and have done a great deal of observational development. My Federal cases have exhibited an average .0055 bulge just above the head. Ken Waters denotes a max of .007 bulge for max loads in a .30-30.
30.5 grs of H4895 yield a rather effective (accurate) load with a 180 gr Mag Tip, but I'm not sure of velocity. I'd like to gain another 75-100 fps but have no access to a chronograph yet.
The Mag-tips have shown excellent expansion characteristics (cottonwood stumps with fist sized holes through them)
out to 150 yds, but I'd like to push it a little. Does anyone have a chronograph that they'd be willing to share for a couple of hours at the range?
 

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lever action?
contender?

If it's a lever gun, DON'T PUSH IT!

otherwise... learn to read the primer, it's usually the first sign. It'll flatten just a little when the load gets warm. If it backs out or craters, you need to back off at least one grain. On bolt guns an extracter will leave a mark on a "too hot" case.

If you have an accurate load, why not leave it alone. An extra 100 fps gains you nothing in the hunting world :D
 

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Singleshot- you have wise knowledge of one so young. however the only safe to gain velocity is to lighten that slug. 180 is definately on the heavy end. were it me , go lighter bullet more velocity, and let that higher velocity get you more kill power. i have a chrony also and would gladly let you shoot through it to gain the numbers. also havd some pet loads from years back that i loved. i will look them up in my olkd records and pm them to you. and chet is right look to the primers for that first sign of too much pressure. they flatten like crazy when your pushing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm getting really excited about this!
First off, I'm using a Savage mod 219 break action w/ 26" barrel.
I purchased this rifle because of the mirror clean bore and beautifully tight lockup. This rifle was built in 1938, but upon closer inspection when I took it home (I disassembled and thoroughly cleaned every part), I thoroughly believe this rifle has had no more than ten rounds through it in its lifetime.
Primers show no evidence of excessive pressure- they're the first thing I check, immediately after firing. I'm in good shape there.

My desire to hop this load up a bit is to gain a little more confidence for use on cow elk. I had a (borrowed) 1917 Enfield '06, but my bro-in-law asked for it back a couple of days ago. There goes that one.

I've also got a 6.5 Arisaka that I'm in the process of sporterizing. It's not yet ready for field duty. I'm having trouble locating dies, but when I do I'll be stuffing it w/ 160 gr Hornady roundnoses for elk and 140 gr BT for deer.

Here are two other loads I've worked up and am excited to try in the .30-30:

130 gr Barnes TSX BT over 31.0 grs RL-7= 2,640 fps vel., .340 B.C.
165 gr Nosler Bal. Tip over 33 grs H-4895= 2,350 fps vel., .475 B.C.
I'm supposing the 180 Mag Tip clocks out at 2200 fps (approx)
All these loads are found in PET LOADS (except the 180 gr- that one's mine), though Waters suggests another 100 fps is possible without undue pressure. I want to push this projectile faster to ensure adequate expansion at practical field ranges.

This is a real eye-opener: plug the above weights, velocities, and B.C.'s into hornady's 'ballistics calculator' at Hornady.com
I also input 30 degrees mean temp, and 27.0 in.Hg barometric pressure to simulate high country conditions. 200 yards is my standard zero. You'd never believe you'd get this from a .30-30!
 
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