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Is anyone familiar with this gun or the mfg? Is it worth restoring for the wall? And is it even possible (are parts available, etc)? It's missing the fore end stock and the hammers are broken off.









 

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I did a quick Google search. Just from the name. It's possibly over 100 yrs old! I would personally try to find the part's. Even if it's not funtional it would be a great conversation piece!!!
 

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do a google search for the parts if not hang it on the wall
 

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But if youre gonna throw it out let me know. I gotta special little place for it.
 

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No. It would cost more than it's worth.

From WikiAnswers: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_v ... ial_213694

The Hartford Arms Co. was a trade name used by Cresent Firearms (which appears to have been part of H & D Folsom Arms Co.--confusing, you bet). These were low cost firearms sold through major hardware stores in the late 1800's. They were usually not of the quality of a Winchester, Colt, or Remington firearm. Most of them were designed during the black powder years and should not be used with modern powder. That said, there is a small amount of collector interest in high grade or very good condition guns fron this era. The condition of the firearn will mean everything on this gun as far a value goes. The fact that it has exposed hammers might even help in this reguard. Damascus barrels would probably also be a plus. Even with all this (unless it is of museum quality) I would not expect more than $200 to $300 from a collector. Shooters should probably stay away fron it. If it is not in very good condition my advice would be to deactivate it ( to make it lawyer proof) and hang it over the fireplace.
 
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