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We had quite an amazing spot for a few years along the Idaho/Utah border. When we started walking through the sage, the hillside looked like it was moving there were so many bunnies.

My favorite area had a thick little draw that I’d take a shotgun down into and brush for everyone else. It was nothing to kill 50-60 rabbits in that draw single-handedly.
 

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Interesting, thank you. I've been going out earlier in the day (admittedly only mid morning. Hard to get out of bed super early on my 1 day off lol). Maybe I'll try a later hunt. I'm going to (try to) get out at first light and stomp around, maybe do some target shooting at a spot nearby until dusk, and then try again. Will report back after Saturday.
I would definitely go earlier or later. Rabbits are crepuscular just like deer or elk. They are most active at first and last light. If you're not seeing much definitely move. Sign in snow is helpful but if it's not a complete highway I wouldn't get too excited. One rabbit can make lots of tracks. I've found rabbits, especially cottontails really like washes/ditches. Walk the top edge of washes for better shot opportunities. Also, take more people, sometimes they don't move unless you about step on them. If it's just one guy you may be walking past a lot.
 

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This thread reminds me of the LDS stake rabbit hunts back in the 60s. These hunts were community fund-raising events with the added benefit of providing at least a little population control. Lines of 20 or more shotgun shooters would push through the sage brush, driving towards each other. When the 2 lines approaching each other got too close to shoot, the kids would rush forward with clubs. The old folks were positioned with .22s to pick off any rabbits that escaped the lines. Riders on horseback would gather up the rabbits in gunny sacks and deposit them in nearby trucks to haul away. The ladies provided chili, hot chocolate and pie (making a good pie was prestigious and competition between pie bakers was fierce, although always good humored). We always killed hundreds of jacks.

True story. Those days will never return, but I can still be motivated to do **** near anything for a really good homemade pie.
 

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This thread reminds me of the LDS stake rabbit hunts back in the 60s. These hunts were community fund-raising events with the added benefit of providing at least a little population control. Lines of 20 or more shotgun shooters would push through the sage brush, driving towards each other. When the 2 lines approaching each other got too close to shoot, the kids would rush forward with clubs. The old folks were positioned with .22s to pick off any rabbits that escaped the lines. Riders on horseback would gather up the rabbits in gunny sacks and deposit them in nearby trucks to haul away. The ladies provided chili, hot chocolate and pie (making a good pie was prestigious and competition between pie bakers was fierce, although always good humored). We always killed hundreds of jacks.

True story. Those days will never return, but I can still be motivated to do **** near anything for a really good homemade pie.
.....anything? 👁👄👁
Food Wood Ingredient Recipe Cuisine
 

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Lots of cool old memories from the good old days in this thread. My Grandpa Williams grew up on the family farm just off the Lund Highway. He remembers a winter in the 40s where school was closed down for a couple weeks because there was several feet of snow everywhere (and we think this winter is something to talk about) and he had a blast because he could go out and blast bunnies outside the house all the time. Apparently the numbers were pretty insane. My dad who was a highschool kid in the 70s said a typical outing was right around 20 rabbits per gun. Anything less than that felt like a waste of time.
 

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We did the same thing hunting jacks. When it got too easy using the shotguns we switched to 22 Lr rifles. Then when it was too easy with the 22's we switched to our deer hunting rifles. I killed a lot of jacks with my 30-06 when they would get out of range of the 22's and then stop.

Made me a lot better rifle shot.
 

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I recall going out near park valley to hunt jacks back in the 80's there would be about 6 of us in are party 22's in hand and a few packing shot guns I would take a box of 500 hundred rounds by the time We would start heading back to the truck We would have only a few rounds left and alot of jacks laid out for the feast for all the predators .
 

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I wonder how much of the jackrabbit decline has to do with environmental factors and how much of it has to do with them having always had unprotected status and us "conservationist" hunters being all too eager to play the part of the benevolent population control artist. 🙄

I'm not pointing fingers at anybody because I sure enjoyed my part in it.
 

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This is my favorite thread ! I would always try to put the carcass in a ceder tree hoping a bird of prey would get a meal in stead of a coyote . We ridiculed each other if we brought them back to the truck . Now I think I should have left them on the ground after reading all this about lead poisoning. Woops
 

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For many years they were considered pests. We graduated from rabbits to rats at the dump. We would go through 500 rounds per person every time we went out. Great practice for hip/wing shooting and it was much closer than the rabbit hunting.
Rabbit hunting was limited to head shots only to make it more sporting :)
 

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I wonder how much of the jackrabbit decline has to do with environmental factors and how much of it has to do with them having always had unprotected status and us "conservationist" hunters being all too eager to play the part of the benevolent population control artist. 🙄

I'm not pointing fingers at anybody because I sure enjoyed my part in it.
Honestly, that particular area at the end of that winter had zero vegetation or bark left within 18-24" of the ground, and mummified dead rabbits everywhere once the snow melted.

For every one of the couple thousand my buddies and I killed prior to that there were 10 running off unscathed only to wind up starving to death.
 

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Honestly, that particular area at the end of that winter had zero vegetation or bark left within 18-24" of the ground, and mummified dead rabbits everywhere once the snow melted.

For every one of the couple thousand my buddies and I killed prior to that there were 10 running off unscathed only to wind up starving to death.
You don't have to explain yourself to me, Jonathon. I know that nothing you ever do is motivated by unquenchable bloodthirst. 🤣🤣🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I wonder how much of the jackrabbit decline has to do with environmental factors and how much of it has to do with them having always had unprotected status and us "conservationist" hunters being all too eager to play the part of the benevolent population control artist. 🙄

I'm not pointing fingers at anybody because I sure enjoyed my part in it.
I have to agree with this. It's cool to hear all these stories of "the good old days," but it also makes me sad to think of all the waste of shooting animals just to shoot them. The added cherry on top of a lot with these "conservationists" as you put it, are also leaving their empty beer cans/broken bottles in the wake of their pickup driving off the designated roads (not accusing anyone here of that, but you know the kind of guy I'm talking about).

Also, makes you wonder how many cottontails have been killed because a drunk ******* sees ears and starts blasting?
 

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Lots of cool old memories from the good old days in this thread. My Grandpa Williams grew up on the family farm just off the Lund Highway. He remembers a winter in the 40s where school was closed down for a couple weeks because there was several feet of snow everywhere (and we think this winter is something to talk about) and he had a blast because he could go out and blast bunnies outside the house all the time. Apparently the numbers were pretty insane. My dad who was a highschool kid in the 70s said a typical outing was right around 20 rabbits per gun. Anything less than that felt like a waste of time.
We used to hunt rabbits out by Lund Highway back in the mid 70's. Along with Midvalley Road, behind Enoch, and out on Minersville Hwy.
Our best spots were where the turd whirler is now, and out on the Clark farm on Minersville Hwy north of Enoch.
All the places that are subdivisions are now :confused:
Always used .22 rifles at first. Slayed them for a long time.
I finally started taking my dad's Colt .22 pistol just for kicks. Got pretty good with that pistol. Used to piss my buddy off that I could get as many bunnies with that as he did with his .22 rifle. :cool:
When I was 19 I bought my own Colt. My girlfriend at the time was 23........so it's actually in her name.... Love that gun still. Now I have my Dad's Colt as well. Used it to quality for my conceal permit years ago.
That's why I still shoot pistols pretty well, I'm guessing. Was a lot of fun.
Don't go out like that much anymore. Have been with the grandkids a few times. But, don't see the rabbits like we used to. And we have to go a lot further out of town than we used to. Use that to teach them gun safety and about hunting with others. A couple of them are good shots already. It's still enjoyable.
 
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