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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've done quite a bit of hunting at the various WMA's by the GSL, and I'm a little frustrated. Not much going on, considering I'm afoot. I don't do much shooting, mostly because I couldn't retrieve anything I've downed if it goes astray.
Not asking for hotspots- but a heads up on someplace (rivers, reservoirs, etc) with decent access would be great, preferably with a fair amount of public ground. Just a 'general area' or name of a creek/river would do fine. I'd like to try jumpshooting; it's more my style anyway- akin to gunning bunnies or chukars, ain't it?
I'm in Salt Lake, but am willing to drive up to an hour to an hour and a half or so each way, depending on the week.
any help on this one?

p.s.- Any suggestions on choke? Mine's Full, but I could get another tube if necessary.
 

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Buy an IC or Lt Mod choke, and get a hunting dog.

Full choke is fine if your hunting turkeys. For everything else you'll find yourself hitting more birds if you open your pattern. Hunting birds without a dog is not only frustrating and restrictive, it's also unethical.The best way to preserve and protect the birds you hunt is to do it with a well trained pooch. For what you're doing a well bred Lab would suit your needs.

The rest will take care of it's self if you just get out. :D
 

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TEX-O-BOB said:
Buy an IC or Lt Mod choke, and get a hunting dog. Hunting birds without a dog is not only frustrating and restrictive, it's also unethical.
I have some spots that I hit late season but they all require a dog. You're just as screwed if you don't have one and the bird falls across the creek or river as you would be if it fell out in the weeds on a WMA. Crossing a river or creek, or god forbid dealing with a pond in single digit temps because a bird is in the middle or on the other side really is a harsh circumstance. Trust me, I've fallin in my fair share of times and cold clothes suck!!! Also, waders may be the answer for some, but they sure are miserable to hike in, at least for long distances. Of course, I don't really have that issue at this point (because of my little mutt), but I used to. Also, its surprising how quickly a downed bird (even a dead one) can disappear from the "exact spot" you marked it down in the grass, sage, bushes, or whatever. Thank god for dogs because mine has saved my birds a few times for me.

About spots, any of the main rivers running out of the canyons on the front might have birds on them, and there are all sorts of canals, warm springs and ponds around for the hunting. Just takes a little legwork to cover em all. I'd start on main rivers because I'd guess they're the closest to the big water that the ducks used to be on and then maybe check out some other smaller spots in your spare time. Good luck.
 

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I know how your feel. I hunted for three years without a dog and it fealt like you lost birds a lot and once ice hit you had no idea what to do. The next year I hunted over my neighbors puppy that they would let me barrow and finally last year I got my own dog and had to hunt over him while he was a puppy for a year. This year I have seen how important they really are. I have turned my dog into a hunting machine. I have not lost hardly any birds this year while hunting over him. Right now there are still places to hunt on the WMA's but you just need to know where to look. Some spots are really thick but my dog sure likes the thick crap so it works good for me. Get a good lab that you can work and bond with. That dog will become your best hunting buddy cause when nobody else wants to go just open the gun safe and the dog will be standing on your heels ready to go.
 

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TagmBagm said:
I know how your feel. I hunted for three years without a dog and it fealt like you lost birds a lot and once ice hit you had no idea what to do. The next year I hunted over my neighbors puppy that they would let me barrow and finally last year I got my own dog and had to hunt over him while he was a puppy for a year. This year I have seen how important they really are. I have turned my dog into a hunting machine. I have not lost hardly any birds this year while hunting over him. Right now there are still places to hunt on the WMA's but you just need to know where to look. Some spots are really thick but my dog sure likes the thick crap so it works good for me. Get a good lab that you can work and bond with. That dog will become your best hunting buddy cause when nobody else wants to go just open the gun safe and the dog will be standing on your heels ready to go.
+1!
 

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Yep, every waterfowl hunter needs a dog. My signature line says it all "The best waterfowl conservation tool of all is a well trained retriever." While you will still loss a bird once in a great while; you will recover many you would not without a dog. I couldn't began to count the birds Mojo has saved from being lost.

As for chokes the good old IC will do you just fine.

I have been going out and have not found a spot holding a lot of birds yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, guys-
I've got waders and a float tube. My landlord won't allow pets, so my lil' sis (Lola) lives with my Dad. She's half German Shorthair and half Pit. Great instincts: she POINTS jacks and cottontails! She hasn't the foggiest clue how to retrieve, though.
Another funny trait- she's so fast, I've seen her run down jacks across open fields. Can't very well shoot, though.
She's a great huntin' buddy, but not much use for ducks.
I'll figure somethin' out. Maybe Dad would like a friend for Lola?
 
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