Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hogan brought up a point in another topic that I thought I'd ask about here. You hear A LOT about whitetails "jumping the string" back east... getting a jump on the arrow as soon as they hear the sound of your bow going off. Now, thats a hell of a response time, since for most modern compound bows, and probably even recurves and longbows at close ranges, the sound to impact time is mere milliseconds. Obviously longer distances allow more reflex time for the animal... however, do mulies and other critters here jump the string? The elk I shot at this year HAD NO CLUE that I'd shot at them until my arrow thumped a tree...and my bow isn't what I'd consider really quiet. Then, they kinda jumped, stood around and then trotted off. It wasn't a rumble through the jungle rush or anything. Do the critters over here get jumpy like that?? And if not... why not? It seems there are tons of people hunting them over here during the archery season.... and is that a contributing factor to the whitetail being so skittish? Are they possibly just a bit smarter than our game out here?? Just some thoughts I'm having as I sit here.... Feel free to give whatever opinion you have on the matter. 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,945 Posts
Yes they do jump the string. yep those elk had no clue we where there and we got in on the just right.The last deer I shot at this year jumped my string.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
876 Posts
In sixteen years of bow hunting and of all the animals I have shot at, I have only had one animal, a deer, jump an arrow. What was surprising is it was only about 35 yards away. It amazed me at how quick the reaction of this deer was, it was like it could see the arrow coming at it. I have a friend who had it happen to him a couple times, but his arrows had somr odd fletching that made them have a loud whistle in flight (the plastic vanes by Innovative Technologies). I think the deer jumped the sound of the arrow. He has since changed his setup. I have found that on my longer shots with a good silent shooting bow, the deer are unaware of the shot until the arrow has gone through them. Like Chuck stated in the article, the animals are more likely to jump your arrow if they are aware of your presence, so be "sneekee". Also, some animals are more proned to being jumpy like deer, bull elk are just stupid and oblivious much of the time, but cow elk are another story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,174 Posts
I don't think whitetails are 'smarter', just 'jumpier'. I have seen muleys, and yes even bull elk jump the string. If an animal is edgy, they are likely to jump the string. The best way to avoid it is with a quiet setup and only shooting and relaxed animals. There is no bow on the planet fast enough to counter the reflexes of wild game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
The first deer I ever shot with a bow almost jumped the string. She was staring right at me broad side 16 yards. I was shooting for the heart and by the time the arrow reached her, she had dropped enough that the arrow hit her in the spine and dropped her like a rock. If she had been any further away I would have completely missed her. It was a lesson learned about shooting and what animals are capable of when they are aware your there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
dkhntrdstn said:
Yes they do jump the string. yep those elk had no clue we where there and we got in on the just right.
Yeah, it wasn't like that avalanche of falling trees the first time we got near em huh? If we'd been closer to those when they took off, all that noise would have scared the crap out of me. :lol:

So.... do you guys shoot when you know an animal has you pegged at the risk of them jumping the string and leaving you to wonder about a questionable hit?? Or do you back off and try to reapproach later when they've settled down? Just curious because I'm new at this and figure I won't always be as lucky as I was with the elk this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,624 Posts
There is ONLY one time it is ok to shoot an animal from afar, out of your comfort zone, and when the animal is alert of your presence....

Its called a follow up shot. Otherwise get closer. IMO you may do whatever is necessary to harvest a wounded animal. This is after waiting appropriate bleeding time etc. This falls more into the archery section than the big game.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,945 Posts
Yeah, it wasn't like that avalanche of falling trees the first time we got near em huh? If we'd been closer to those when they took off, all that noise would have scared the crap out of me.
we would have been closer we would have been packing a elk out.nope they where not scared at all they just could not figer out what was that sounds and where it come from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,021 Posts
proutdoors said:
I don't think whitetails are 'smarter', just 'jumpier'. I have seen muleys, and yes even bull elk jump the string. If an animal is edgy, they are likely to jump the string. The best way to avoid it is with a quiet setup and only shooting and relaxed animals. There is no bow on the planet fast enough to counter the reflexes of wild game.
The man speaketh the truth.

ANY animal that is coiled and ready to blow has the edge when it comes to getting out of the way of an arrow. AND, I've had deer jump my string when they had no clue I was there too. Back when I shot a compound I was sitting a water hole when a nice buck came in to water. I waited for him to settle down and start drinking before I even attempted a shot. When I released my 72 lb bow going 230 fps(that was fast in 1985) that buck ducked completely out of the way of my arrow before it traveled the 18 yards to him. In fact, I think I shot 2 inches over his back! :shock: I was amazed to say the least.

If they wanna get out of the way, they will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You're right Hogan... I just put it here because it was a spinoff of the "Chuck" post. That might ought to be moved as well. Anyway... when I talked about animals having you pegged, I was talking about you stalking along a trail...early morning or whatever and a few deer step out in front of you. None seem to know you're there and there's a decent four or who knows, maybe even just a two point (since I'm trying to be all inclusive here)with them. You move to draw your bow and one of the does nails you.... you're thirty yards away, having a staredown with now five or six deer who have looked up to see what the doe is all wigged out about. Do you shoot the buck thats in the middle of them (spaced from the others) all and risk hitting another one if they jump the string and turn back into your shot?? Or do you let your draw down and watch them all run off? I bring up this situation because I was hiking up to find a buddy of mine and had a bunch of deer walk out on me.... I wasn't hunting at the time but did get nailed by one doe and we stared at each other for a few minutes before she turned and they all bounced down into the woods. 8) There were two bucks I'd have shot at if I had a tag and a bow with me..... and if that situation comes up this year, I'd like to have some input as to what your actions would be under those circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,222 Posts
I've had buckies do the opposit also. I have been following a deer as it is walking, keeping the sight right in front of his shoulder to lead him a bit so I don't hit too far back and then when I shoot, he stops to see what the noise was and the arrow flys right in front of him, and right where I was aiming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,174 Posts
Riverrat77 said:
You're right Hogan... I just put it here because it was a spinoff of the "Chuck" post. That might ought to be moved as well. Anyway... when I talked about animals having you pegged, I was talking about you stalking along a trail...early morning or whatever and a few deer step out in front of you. None seem to know you're there and there's a decent four or who knows, maybe even just a two point (since I'm trying to be all inclusive here)with them. You move to draw your bow and one of the does nails you.... you're thirty yards away, having a staredown with now five or six deer who have looked up to see what the doe is all wigged out about. Do you shoot the buck thats in the middle of them (spaced from the others) all and risk hitting another one if they jump the string and turn back into your shot?? Or do you let your draw down and watch them all run off? I bring up this situation because I was hiking up to find a buddy of mine and had a bunch of deer walk out on me.... I wasn't hunting at the time but did get nailed by one doe and we stared at each other for a few minutes before she turned and they all bounced down into the woods. 8) There were two bucks I'd have shot at if I had a tag and a bow with me..... and if that situation comes up this year, I'd like to have some input as to what your actions would be under those circumstances.
I would NEVER take a shot where there is a likelihood of hitting/wounded another animal as part of the scenario. A 'calm' animal CAN jump the string, an alert animal looking at you most likely WILL. The last buck I shot way back in 2001 was trotting away from me at an angle. I cow chirped and he stopped at 47 yards looking right at me. I released my arrow and the buck didn't duck, but he did kick at the arrow. He broke off the last 4 inches of my XX78 off. Luckily the rest of the arrow did a complete pass through. I instantly regretted taking that shot, and still re-live it every time I see a nice buck. If I am ever in a similar situation again, I will NOT take the shot, even though I am now a much better shot today than I was then. It was too far, and the animal was too alert. Even though the animal quickly expired, it was a HORRIBLE shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Hey pro, I am a little confused about your post. Are you saying the buck saw the arrow coming and he kicked at the arrow? As in directly at the arrow or was he just jumping the sound of the bow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
elk22hunter said:
I've had buckies do the opposit also. I have been following a deer as it is walking, keeping the sight right in front of his shoulder to lead him a bit so I don't hit too far back and then when I shoot, he stops to see what the noise was and the arrow flys right in front of him, and right where I was aiming.
+1 Had the same happen once, that why they say never shoot at a moving deer. :wink:

I've killed a bunch of whitetails with a bow, had a few jump the string and duck under the shot, solution to this problem tuck your pin down low and release, that way they duck into the shot.

They are right, an alert nervous deer is a lot more likely to jump the string than one just feeding away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,174 Posts
Justice said:
Hey pro, I am a little confused about your post. Are you saying the buck saw the arrow coming and he kicked at the arrow? As in directly at the arrow or was he just jumping the sound of the bow?
The buck kicked at the arrow with his left hind foot and broke the arrow as it entered the left side of his chest. Between the contact of the arrow and him kicking at the arrow he fell over and rolled right back up. I wouldn't have believed it myself if not for seeing it with my own eyes. wapiti67 was a eyewitness to the event as well. The buck was looking right at me and I am positive he saw the arrow just as it got to him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I had the same thing happen while muzzeloader hunting a few years back, I shot at a buck and it kicked my bullet out of the air, strangest thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
I did witness that event...I still can't believe an animal can move that fast....****!! But it's a testament to the fact, that the arrow still had enough energy left to continue on through, and knock the buck DOWN.
I had a bull duck my arrow at 20 yrds in 2003. Pissed me off so bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,174 Posts
wapiti67 said:
I did witness that event...I still can't believe an animal can move that fast....****!! But it's a testament to the fact, that the arrow still had enough energy left to continue on through, and knock the buck DOWN.
I had a bull duck my arrow at 20 yrds in 2003. **** me off so bad.
There were no witnesses to that big stinky bull "ducking" your arrow. :shock: :wink: Bull of a lifetime gone in .003 seconds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,336 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mojo1 said:
solution to this problem tuck your pin down low and release, that way they duck into the shot.

They are right, an alert nervous deer is a lot more likely to jump the string than one just feeding away.
I was kinda wondering if you'd ring in on here... you're from way down south right?? Around Alabama or something? Thats cool that you've gotten to hunt whitetails down there.... I'd heard that also that you just aim a tad low on your shots that way animals that jump the string go right into your arrow..... does that hold true for all of the shots?? I mean, can you hold a little lower than "right on" on all your shots and still have a reasonable expectation of a killing shot if the animal doesn't jump the string? I don't know if thats a good idea or not, but it would seem that way you're prepared for either circumstance.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top