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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In doing research on the yotes I came across this article and several others echoing the same sentiment (obviously a very far left leaning institution that has produced the article):
"In an effort to help increase the deer population and also protect grazing sheep in Utah, the state provides money to eight Utah counties to pay bounties for killing coyotes."

Read the story in in Tooele Transcript Bulletin. Tooele is pronounced (TA will a).

Offering bounties on coyotes is a long discredited program, nevertheless it continues for political purposes.

It does not decrease the number of coyotes except in rare instances. Instead the coyote population increases unless 40 to 50% of the population is killed a year. Bounties and the many other efforts to kill coyotes are one of the reasons coyotes have spread from the West to the entire North American continent.

Replacement of existing coyotes with new coyotes, tends to increase predation on sheep if sheep predation was at a background level to begin with. The way to reduce sheep predation is to kill the coyote pairs or packs that kill the sheep, not a general assault on coyotes.

Coyotes are not primary predators on big game (except in harsh winters). Coyotes do reduce rodent populations and fox populations.

Even you don't mind lots of "killin," this is not cost/effective.

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Coyote Bounties

"During the early years of game management, many states relied on massive killing efforts (bounties) to
reduce predator numbers (e.g., wolves, coyotes, foxes) which were competing with man for game animals (e.g., white-tailed deer). Bounties are not used by most wildlife agencies nor are they supported by WS for predator control because:

• Bounties are not effective in reducing damage.
• Circumstances surrounding take of animals is largely unregulated.
• No process exists to prohibit taking animals from outside the damage management area for
compensation purposes.
• Bounty hunters may mistake dogs and foxes as coyotes.

Coyote bounties have a long history (>100 years in the U.S.) of use in many states without ever achieving the intended result of reducing damage and population levels (Parker 1995).

The overwhelming disadvantage of coyote bounties is the misdirection of funds meant to, but not effectively and economically able to, reduce coyote damage to livestock."

This was taken from http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ws/nepa/WVcoyoteFONSI.pdf
This article does not specify the theory, but it is somehow to the point of the younger females breed earlier than normal and therefore have more breeding females than would occur naturally...

One thing that I did see about the Colorado program indicates:
Research in Utah suggests coyotes with pups kill more deer fawns than nonbreeding coyotes.
Of course, this would contradict the previous theory.
 

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I guess we should just let all the predators go unchecked. :? :roll:

Every deer hunter should be REQUIRED to kill every coyote on sight!
 

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Only, and only if, the local area dominant male is killed. Then it could be possible.
But, I think the direction of the article is pure [email protected]!
So, less coyotes = more coyotes??? I do think having a few coyotes around is good for gamebirds, however. They put the hurt on the foxes, skunks, and raccoons, etc. It's all a balance that nature will adjust for somehow. I would like to see any (if any) data on a relavant study about coyote population dymanics/ related to deer, etc. :roll:
 

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Killing coyotes creates more coyotes? Ain't so!
I agree with proutdoors.

There are lots of variables, however as far as deer populations in Northern Utah is concerned, the limiting factor has always been, and will continue to be, winter habitat. Unfortunately we have lost a good deal of winter habitat to housing developments.
 

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Every deer hunter should be REQUIRED to kill every coyote on sight![/quote]

ATTABOY! +1!
 

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James said:
Killing coyotes creates more coyotes? Ain't so!
I agree with proutdoors.

There are lots of variables, however as far as deer populations in Northern Utah is concerned, the limiting factor has always been, and will continue to be, winter habitat. Unfortunately we have lost a good deal of winter habitat to housing developments.
+1 True that!
 

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We all need to do our part in predator control. It never hurts to kill coyotes regardless of the time of year. Many people question why people kill coyotes when the pelts arent good, but there will always be plenty of coyotes to hunt in the winter when the pelts are good.
 

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There will NEVER be a shortage of coyotes! I don't think that there is a way known to man to comlpletely eliminate them.
 

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Huge29, I would be interested in reading the original story, but the link leads to a "Page not found" error. Any chance of fixing that?

The theory about coyote population dynamics seems counterintuitive and more like someone trying to justify a biased point of view. Still, I'd like to see if the author actually cited some credible scientific work on the subject. I'm a lot more inclined to take something like this seriously if it's unbiased and evidence-based than I am when someone just says something is so and leaves it at that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Petersen said:
Huge29, I would be interested in reading the original story, but the link leads to a "Page not found" error. Any chance of fixing that?

The theory about coyote population dynamics seems counterintuitive and more like someone trying to justify a biased point of view. Still, I'd like to see if the author actually cited some credible scientific work on the subject. I'm a lot more inclined to take something like this seriously if it's unbiased and evidence-based than I am when someone just says something is so and leaves it at that.
Same result here; in searching for the article; here is the same one:
http://wolves.wordpress.com/2006/10/14/utah-offers-bounty-for-dead-coyote-ears/
Read the author's resume, not a biologist, yet he can come up with those conclusions?? I am not a biologist, so I am just as qualified as this nut; I say that he is wrong on all points http://wolves.wordpress.com/about/.
 
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