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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was in a bad car accident two years ago and suffered a C4 spinal cord injury. I'd say I made an excellent recovery because I'm able to walk. However, muscle spasticity makes walking difficult, so putting in big miles like I used to is out of the question.

My 16 & 14 year old sons and I have hunted private property general for the last two seasons, but I've been feeling bad because I feel I'm taking advantage of my friend with the property. I know he's happy to let me hunt there, but I've still been feeling I can't expect my friends to carry my crippled butt for the rest of my life. :) So, I'd like to put them in for a limited entry this year. I know the odds of them drawing out are low, but still...

Here's my question. Is there a LE buck unit with easier access, something I can hunt from a four wheeler? I'm not saying road hunting entirely, as I can get off the ATV and hike over small hills about a mile away from the four wheeler. I'm not expecting this area to be a monster buck area, just a place where my boys and I can have fun with less hunter competition. I can't really deal with snow though. My muscles have higher spasticity in the cold, to the point where I have difficulty moving.

This brings up another question too. I always hunted Northern region ( 3 or 4,5,6) muzzy until my injury, then I went to rifle after the injury. Mostly because it was in my back yard and I didn't have any time to take off work. Now that I have vacation time, I'd like to venture further out and make a week hunting trip out if it. What units would you suggest that would fit my requirements mentioned above?

Thank you for the suggestions.

Roy

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Where do you live? There are many units that I probally have never been on that would server you great. But with personal expierence, the Vernon, Dolores triangle, and from what I have heard about the book cliffs as well would be a good hunt for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I live in Morgan County. I edited my original post to say where I have been hunting in the past.

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Book Cliffs hands down. But don't expect that 180+ deer if you are just driving around in a truck or ATV.
 

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Book Cliffs hands down. But don't expect that 180+ deer if you are just driving around in a truck or ATV.
+1

I was able to tag along on a Book Cliffs deer hunt two years ago. You'll definitely have options. I wouldn't expect anything better than a small 4 point, but you never know.
 

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Book cliffs for sure, but you might also look into some of the CWMUs. There are some that you can have a good chance at a nice 4pt buck with your limited mobility. Good luck! And another thing, you should be applying OIAL and LE for your kids as soon as you can (and really, not just the points any chance is better than none) to help mitigate the point creep problem for them.
 

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Hands Down The Books
This may go without saying, but in case you're inexperienced with the Book Cliffs...

Just make sure you have a good, reliable, high-clearance 4X4 if you go for a Book Cliffs tag. Certain roads can get ugly fast, and stay that way for days. And help may not come along for awhile if you get into trouble.
 

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This may go without saying, but in case you're inexperienced with the Book Cliffs...

Just make sure you have a good, reliable, high-clearance 4X4 if you go for a Book Cliffs tag. Certain roads can get ugly fast, and stay that way for days. And help may not come along for awhile if you get into trouble.
When was the last time you were in the Book Cliffs? The majority of the roads can be driven with a touring car and even when they get wet if you stay on the main roads they are not that bad. Not to mention a main road paved 99% of the way to the Divide Road.

Now if you get off the main roads it can get a little bad but even the side roads are not bad as long as it isn't wet.
 

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When was the last time you were in the Book Cliffs? The majority of the roads can be driven with a touring car and even when they get wet if you stay on the main roads they are not that bad. Not to mention a main road paved 99% of the way to the Divide Road.

Now if you get off the main roads it can get a little bad but even the side roads are not bad as long as it isn't wet.
I'll agree right away that you'll probably only run into problems if it rains enough to soak the road.

I hunted there twice in 2013. Coincidentally, my only two family members putting in for the Book Cliffs at that time both drew tags that year (deer with 5 points and late season rifle elk with 12 or 13). I think they were just getting the pavement going when we headed in. I'll admit there is a significant portion of the Book Cliffs I have not been to, so maybe my experience was not representative of the whole.

Seep Ridge is fine, as are a lot of the bigger roads. If you want to stay on those, I guess there won't be much of a problem. I figured if the OP was hunting primarily from a vehicle, he would probably want to head down a number of smaller side roads, and that's where the potential for trouble would be.

It rained two days before we went in for the deer hunt, and Willow Creek through Bull Canyon to Winter Ridge was a rutted, muddy mess. We opted to head out via Winter Ridge to Seep Ridge. We encountered several nasty mud holes on Winter Ridge road as well.

By the time the elk hunt rolled around, the roads dried out. Winter Ridge was fine, an Bull Canyon and Willow Creek were dry but still rutted, and moderate to high clearance would still be advisable there.

I would guess that a general rule of thumb would be more oil development = better roads.
 

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I agree with you on some of those roads but if he has a 4x4 vehicle or access to a ATV there will be no problems getting around out there.

I started hunting out there in 1972 and you should of seen the roads then......there weren't any to speak of. But there were a lot of two track cow paths.
 

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I agree with you on some of those roads but if he has a 4x4 vehicle or access to a ATV there will be no problems getting around out there.

I started hunting out there in 1972 and you should of seen the roads then......there weren't any to speak of. But there were a lot of two track cow paths.
When I draw my November season rifle tag this year (I've got one point going in, so I'm feeling pretty good about it), I'll let you be my guide, ok? :mrgreen: I'd sure appreciate that kind of experience. One of my family members (second cousin twice removed or something like that) started hunting there in the 80's, and he's got a lot of great stories about the good old days out there. I wish I could have been there to see how it was.
 

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When I draw my November season rifle tag this year (I've got one point going in, so I'm feeling pretty good about it), I'll let you be my guide, ok? :mrgreen: I'd sure appreciate that kind of experience. One of my family members (second cousin twice removed or something like that) started hunting there in the 80's, and he's got a lot of great stories about the good old days out there. I wish I could have been there to see how it was.
If I drew a late season November ML tag and they leave the boundary open no north and south unit I would hunt the south end north of Cisco around Nash Wash for a easy hunt. For a harder one I would head over to the Colorado border on the south end and hunt the low lands.
 

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If I drew a late season November ML tag and they leave the boundary open no north and south unit I would hunt the south end north of Cisco around Nash Wash for a easy hunt. For a harder one I would head over to the Colorado border on the south end and hunt the low lands.
Oops, I probably didn't make it clear that I'm putting in for elk. If by some miracle I do pull the tag, we may have to talk more...

Alright, I'm done hijacking now. Apologies to the OP, and good luck in the draw!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
I really appreciate the advice. I was actually wondering if I was going to put in for any hunts this year, but then I remember that my kids shouldn't have to miss out because I got hurt.

I need to find a general season unit to start applying for that isn't so full of private ground too. I've always had fun on 4/5/6, but I'm hoping to find a unit with easier accessibility to public land and still give my boys an opportunity to harvest a deer.



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I really appreciate the advice. I was actually wondering if I was going to put in for any hunts this year, but then I remember that my kids shouldn't have to miss out because I got hurt.

I'd also need to find a general season unit to start applying for that isn't so full of private ground.
Good on you. Your kids will have some great opportunities if you get them started now and stick with the application process. I'd second what johnnycake said and suggest you start applying for whatever once-in-a-lifetime species they are most interested in. Those tags will be very hard to draw if they wait awhile before putting in (I learned that lesson the hard way; I could have had a bunch of points by now, but my interest in big game didn't really take off until recently).

Finding a general season deer unit may be a little bit harder for your situation due to the crowds. Good luck there, I hope someone can help you out.

I hunt Wasatch West for deer. If I were mainly confined to roads, I probably would try somewhere else (there are a lot of tags given on that unit).
 
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