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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I just got a .223, and I want to start to get into loading my own rounds for it. I have never even seen it done. As I look at it there is a TON of stuff to buy. I dont even know were to start. If someone would like to be my online mentor that I could ask qestions (a lot of questions) to that would be great just pm me. Thanks in advance.
 

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Ask away. There are several on here that I'm sure would help. I would start off with the purchase of one of the better reloading manuals and read , read and read some more. Speer was the one I chose a long time ago. Also remember the load data is different for every gun. Start low and work up your charges to match that gun. It is a life long hobby. One of the best I ever took up.
 

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My advise would be to buy several of the better manuals. I have several editions of the Hornaday manual, two editions of the Barnes manual, 4 or 5 Hodgdon manuals, a couple of Speer books, and an old Nosler book. At any given time you will find one or more of them in the bathroom for my "quiet time". I have also gotten quite a bit of information from Handloader and Rifle magazines.
 

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I concur with the advise given. I had not seen someone reload bullets until I decided I wanted to do it for myself. I found a guy in my neighborhood who was a gun nut and pumped him for info. Learn all you can about it. Read, read, read. Ask questions and more questions.

You will need to get some basic equipment to reload metallic cartridges. A press, powder measure, scale, powder funnel, loading block, case deburer, primer pocket tool, sizing lube, priming tool, sizing and seating dies for your specific caliber. The sky is the limit on what you can spend. I would reccomend getting the basic equimpent in a kit. RCBS has a Rock Chucker Supreme kit that has all of the basics.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=646599&t=11082005
The press is excellent and will last a lifetime. The measurer and scale are average. I have seen it online for around $240 on sale. You can always add components later. It will get you everything you need to get started with the exception of dies, case holder, bullets, primers and powder. Some online resources for reloading are:

http://www.midwayusa.com/
http://www.natchezss.com/
http://www.hodgdon.com/index.php

I am not an expert by any means, but if you have any questions, I'd be more than happy to try and help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok Im gonna get a book, tomorrow probably. A question I have right now is. These case trimmers, do you have to cut down all cases? Do they expand that much when shot? Another question. Tumblers, is it nessisary to tumble all shot brass? That is all I have for now. Thanks fellas for your willingness to help.
 

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A case trimmer "may not" be neccessary right off the bat, but cases will stretch over a period of time. Some calibers will stretch more than others due to the amount of pressure for that particular cartridge. I'm sure that some will say to start off by trimming all your brass (of that caliber) to a uniform length. The number of times you can use that brass over and over again depends on the pressure of that cartridge. The case tumbler is just a fluff item, not really necessary, but cleans up the cases nicely. Do I have one ? You bet. The comment earlier on what you can spend is very accurate. The skys the limit. I personally love my RCBS and Dillon equipment.

PM sent.
 

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How current do the manuals need to be? How often do mfg's update their shells, wads, powders? Will a 20 year old manual still cover the supplies available today?
 

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I'm just starting out too. I bought the advanced R.C.B.S. kit It came with the trimmer and electronic scale's. I asked a few people that reload and they said I would be much happier with the electronic set up. I have a couple of reloading book's. The one I liked the best was the ABC's of reloading. It answered allot of question's. Good luck. I'll be asking allot of questions too. I'm sure the forum member's will help us out! Thanks in advance!
 

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Gumbo said:
How current do the manuals need to be? How often do mfg's update their shells, wads, powders? Will a 20 year old manual still cover the supplies available today?
I would look for the most current up to date ones I could find.
 

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the question was brought up about trimming cases. rcbs as some dies called X-dies here is some info on them
X-Dies
Trim the case once - never trim again! The X-Sizer Die looks like a regular Full Length Sizer Die. Inside, the die features a specially designed mandrel with an expander ball and decapping pin attached. The mandrel is what the X-Die is all about. The patented X-Sizer Die eliminates the need for repeated trimming after initial trim of .020" off the maximum case length to standardize the case. The X-Die doesn't shorten the length of the case: the mandrel reduces the growth rate as the case grows as a result of the case mouth contacting the mandrel during sizing. Because of an extremely close tolerance between the mandrel and die neck wall, the neck wall of the case odes not thicken as the case length is pushed back. Cases repeatedly sized in the X-Die will initially grow a few thousandths of an inch, then stabilize below the maximum case length with no discernable loss of accuracy or case life.
Available in most popular bottleneck calibers as shown in the chart.

here is the link for the size chart

http://www.a2zoutdoors.com/rcbs_x-dies.htm

also you will find tons of info on the net try google search.

READ THIS
If you are just starting to reload any of the calibers listed, order the X-Full Length Die Set containing the X-Sizer Die and Standard Seater Die. If you already own a regular set of dies for the chosen caliber, order only the X-Full Length Sizer Die, as you won't need to purchase another Seater Die.
 

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Gumbo said:
How current do the manuals need to be? How often do mfg's update their shells, wads, powders? Will a 20 year old manual still cover the supplies available today?
Due to the advances in pressure measuring equipment, the old manuals that rely on the copper crusher method of estimating pressure should be considered obsolete. The newer systems chart the pressure curves and spikes instead of estimating the peak pressure. This is why a lot of data has been reduced in recent years, not in response to the trial lawyers. There has also been a large number of new powders introduced. The Hodgdon manual comes out in a magazine format every year. I consider it $8.00 well spent. Barnes has introduced two new bullet lines (or more) between their 2nd and 3rd editions. Powder lots and burning rates change occasionally. These are a few reasons to buy current loading manuals.
 

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al hansen and I both reload for the 223, dont be afraid to ask anything.
when I began, it was size, trim, debur, prime, charge, seat.
sounds easy enough..... but as I got more into it I now weigh, sort, size, trim, debur neck, uniform primer pocket, debur flash hole, turn neck, prime, charge, seat.
I consider an OAL guage and an electronic scale neccesary items.
the more you reload, the more performance you'll desire.
 

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I posted a bit of info a whole back about reloading.
Here is the url: viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1303

If you are at all mechanically inclined and can pay attention to detail,
reloading is a great hobby. Like others have said, get a good book
and read carefully the procedures. I like the new Hornady book.
Reloading is not that hard to do, but for safety's sake you need good information.

My set up is pretty simple, but adequate for 200-300 a week. Just using a single stage press. I have been reloading for a good many years. I haven't bought much equipment except for dies lately, so don't know what is available nor the prices now a days.

I would be happy to give anyone a demo and talk to you about procedure. Ogden is a ways over the hill though.
 

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Forgot to add: Yes, do get a current manual because things have changed.
 

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Gumbo said:
Loke, any recommendations for shotgun reloading manuals? I think Cabela's has two different ones.
I'm not into shotshell loading, yet. But the Hodgdon manual has a large section of shotshell data.
 
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