Utah Wildlife Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have trained my yellow female lab and have had no problems. I am interested in taking a male from her litter, but i am a little hesitant as to taking a male. Reason being is that first, i hate that they have to mark their territory every 5 min and pissing all over everything. Second, i hunt alot with other female dogs which are not neutered and i would want to have to worry about him constantly by them or having one thing on his mind. Third, i don't want to end up with one of those dogs who thinks they are the head honcho and wants to fight every dog that he sees. Are these things something that can be prevented with training or are they some traits that i may just have to deal with????


Reason i ask is that i want a male for my late season hunts that has a little more stamina, tougher, and not so small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
Many of the problems you mention are easily solved by early neutering of the male dog. By "early" I mean at some point between 10 weeks of age and 5 months. Studies have shown that this practice decreases wandering, leg hiking, aggressiveness, mounting, and other such behaviors in male dogs.

There are differences of opinion about early neuter as a practice. Testosterone, for example, speeds up the closing of growth plates during bone development. Dogs that are neutered early typically grow somewhat larger than they might have otherwise. Some research I've read suggests this may alter the angle of ligaments and joints slightly, and increase the risk of crutiate ligament disease. There are also some problems with urinary incontienence (a pretty small percentage) and some correlations with higher risk of osteosarcoma later in life. Some people also seem to like a certain amount of typical male characteristics, and choose to neuter after 6 months or 1 year.

Despite the possible downsides, eliminating the behaviors in question helps dogs live longer and healthier lives on average. Fewer neutered dogs escape/wander and hence do not get hit by cars, shot, etc. If those behaviors are a big concern, early neuter typically has favorable outcomes in those areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,021 Posts
I've got three split tails in my kennel right now and I'll never own another one.

Males have more heart, desire, stamina, and drive. I've only owned one male dog in my life and he had more of these traits in his left paw than all three of the beoches I now have put together.

Get a male, socialize him while he's young with lots of other dogs and people, NEVER let him get so much as a whiff of the punanni, and cut his balls off when he is done growing and has all his muscle mass. (Usually about 18 months.)

Just like a cut horse, they are the best animal to have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,570 Posts
I find this discussion interesting as I have heard arguments for both sides of the fence. I was interested to find out what most people thought the better bird dog was. I think I heard about a equal balance between the two. Some felt the females quit them while hunting, others felt the male did. Some didn't care for the female going into heat, and some disliked the male lifting his leg all the time. I have come to the conclusion there is really no difference when it comes to hunting drive and endurance. I prefer males over females only because I also trial. I can't trial a female in heat. Other than that I think it comes down to personal preference. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,137 Posts
I have 2 males and a female, and like Tex I've had better luck in the field with males. I must say however that I've hunted around a lot of females, and many have been every bit as driven as males. Heat cycles often mess this up, in fact one of the best GSPs I've hunted around is a female and she becomes useless when in heat.

Tex is right about muscle mass development and early neuter. Holding off until after about 18 months generally results in stockier dogs with a little more beef to them, while early neuter will produce a taller, slightly leaner outcome. Remember that testosterone is also produced outside of the testicles (although less quantity) so neutering does not eliminate the hormone. Stamina is usually not affected, and dogs like pointers that range considerably can benefit from being longer and leaner. Of course, delaying neuter also allows the development of most of the previously mentioned behaviors (leg hiking, wandering, aggressiveness, mounting etc.). Tex is also right about socialization, you can counter the aggressiveness and other issues with proper training.

I don't have a preference, and have both sexes. When I get a new pup, I spend time to pick a litter I like, and then get one that I think has good markings. Sex doesn't play much into the decision. I have one unneutered male who is a brush buster and great hunter, a female that I neutered early who developed fantastically with long legs and great stamina, and I've got a male puppy that I plan to early neuter also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,430 Posts
Like wise pro's and con's with each.... For me I find it easier to train a male dog over a female... That is just me......
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top