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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mountain Hollyhock is a common wildflower found throughout the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. In Utah and Wyoming the plant is particularily fond of burn areas. I see it from time to time, especially in the Bridger Teton National Forest and Yellowstone NP. Last year we took an elk that had a belly full of hollyhock.

The pic below is of a 4-year old prescribed burn on Wyoming's Hams Fork. It was covered with mountain hollyhock. Elk, deer, even antelope were feeding on it last year. And, as everyone knows, there was more than abundant food for big game in 2011.


Mountain Hollyhock is just like the one grown in flower gardens:


Heavily browsed:


You couldn't keep the elk out of this burn last fall:


What paste is made from Mountain Hollyhock?

answer: wasabi
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
73elkhunter said:
are you serious about the wasabi
Well yes, and no. It was common knowledge that wasabi came from hollyhock roots. The Japanese characters for wasabi translates to Mountain Hollyhock. The Japanese plant and American plant look similar, but they are a separate species, separate genus I think.

See the last paragraph in: http://www.reference.com/browse/mountain+hollyhock
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There was a deer in my flower garden this morning eating volunteer hollyhocks. It tried some Bee Balm too. Really, I'm not making this up.

We have a lot of deer living in Evanston this summer. weird
 
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