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Discussion Starter #1
So while hiking on Saturday, I came across this growth. I have no clue how to classify it. To outside has a dry skin that was easily broken. The inside was like a custard pudding. Does any one have a clue? I thought it might be an attractant but it was right on the trail and had a mild pine smell.
 

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I think I've found the identification of the last one. It might be the Scaly hedgehog (Sarcodon Imbricatus). I'm still looking on the other two. I haven't come across anything close to the one in the first post.
 

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Bjorne Lou Tsar
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That last one looks like a hedghog. They have gills that look like hair. They're pretty darn good too. I pickled some last year.
 

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I think I've found the identification of the last one. It might be the Scaly hedgehog (Sarcodon Imbricatus). I'm still looking on the other two. I haven't come across anything close to the one in the first post.
Does it have gills or spines? Hawkwings are common here but they have more distintive scaling and have spines or teeth on the underside.

Might be some kind of Lepiota; would have to see the other side.

whoops! longbow and I posted at the same time
 

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So while hiking on Saturday, I came across this growth. I have no clue how to classify it. To outside has a dry skin that was easily broken. The inside was like a custard pudding. Does any one have a clue? I thought it might be an attractant but it was right on the trail and had a mild pine smell.
It's the rare marshmallow fungus. gooberatus kraftus

I use to see it around our campsites when the kids were growing up. :)

.
 

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Does it have gills or spines? Hawkwings are common here but they have more distintive scaling and have spines or teeth on the underside.

Might be some kind of Lepiota; would have to see the other side.

whoops! longbow and I posted at the same time
I didn't look at the underside, hence part of my uncertainty. We were hiking out fast and I figured I snap a quick pic to start looking. I didn't think it was hawkwings ( pheasant's back(Polyporous squamosus)) because it was growing out of the ground and not on a dead piece of wood. I was up on the same trail this past weekend but I didn't notice it. Makes me wish that I had picked it up. ;-)
 

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I didn't look at the underside, hence part of my uncertainty. We were hiking out fast and I figured I snap a quick pic to start looking. I didn't think it was hawkwings ( pheasant's back(Polyporous squamosus)) because it was growing out of the ground and not on a dead piece of wood. I was up on the same trail this past weekend but I didn't notice it. Makes me wish that I had picked it up. ;-)
Geeze, I'm sorry, I meant hedgehog; a polypore anyway.

The other fungi thingy is what we call a turkey tail. A turkey tail describes about 1,000,000 different types of shelf mushrooms. :)

Thanks for posting, interesting stuff.

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Nope :mrgreen:
That's it; "Nope" and a smiley.

Yer on the top of the page of a thread that's moving as fast as the "new" Republican Congress; a post that will be read by hundreds, if not thousands of times because it is on the top of the page (mostly by guests), and all you have to say is "Nope".

Put up something a little more profound or show the underside of a mushroom. The UWN is "R" rated; we can show the bottoms of mushrooms here.

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