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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a long time bait fisherman who has decided to step up my game to fly fishing for various reasons.

I picked this rod up at a yard sale.

What little I know about fly fishing gear leads me to believe this would be a good all around fly rod. Not too big but not too small. Could match up different weighted lines for different fishing scenarios I believe.

That being said, who thinks this rod was a score for $6.00??

Any suggestions on good set ups for it? Reels? Lines?

Anyone know more about it than I and want to explain it to me? I'm all ears.

I mainly fish for trout but want the flexibility to get it done for bass and other species panfish and whatever else.
 

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Nice score. Understand I am just guessing, but may be a 6wt weight forward floating line for stream/river trout and a 7 wt intermediate sinking full length forward weight line for lake trout and bass. Lighter 6 wt line should give you line speed for dry flies (or indicator fishing if you go to the dark side) and the heavier line for nymphs and bigger streamer in the still water. Any reel with a spare spool that can hold 25 yards of backing with the fly line will work. You will be amazed how simple and fun fly fishing is. The bonus is that most of the fish you catch you can release in good shape, and stilll take what you want for the frying pan.
 

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First, don't but into the idea that taking up fly fishing is a "step up" in your game. It's just a different method.

Second, the famous Lefty Kreh says that all the fly rod is is a lever for casting and you can learn to cast any lever. Another way to say it is: it's not the tool but how you use it that makes the difference. Yes, there is a difference in quality and feel, but I've caught just as many fish on my old Browning Siloflex as I have with my G Lommis and Sage rods. Don't but into all the hype.

Third, you will get every "experts" opinion on these forums, including mine. My best advise is to learn all you can, don't take it all so serious, and fish as much as possible to get the experience for yourself.
 

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I know very little about fly fishing but I had a friend several years ago who wanted to get into it. He's a smart cookie and without knowing anything about it he researched and found a class that teaches fly fishing. I googled it and this looks like something similar:
https://www.westernriversflyfishing.com/Beginning-Fly-Fishing-Classes

I thought this was a great idea and would be what I would be doing if I wanted to get into fly fishing.

I wish they had a course for all outdoor activities: bowhunting mule deer, elk, rifle hunting, duck hunting, all of it!

I can't imagine the time and money it would have saved me in other outdoor pursuits to have a class instead of trial and error or getting info from fellow hunters or the internet. Just thought I would mention this since I think its a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the input everyone. I'm excited to get on a river and learn the technique. Packfish I don't see anything written on the rod other than what's on the sticker in that pic I posted. I got it from an old rancher from Montana who was down the street from my last house. It could be older than I think it is. What info would potentially be there?
 

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It's a 7 weight rod, which in my opinion is a little to heavy for Utah trout fishing. It would make a good Bass, Steelhead, or Salmon fly rod.

You'll want to use 7wt line to make sure the rod loads and casts properly.
 

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The rod will do just fine. HighnDry speaks with great wisdom.

My advise would be to pick up half a dozen fly patterns - pheasant tail, hare's ear, chamois caddis, adams, royal wulff, elk hair caddis. And learn to cast short distances. Most beginners go at it thinking you have to air out 40-50 feet of line. On streams like the Provo, 20 feet of line plus your leader will suit you most of the time. And learn a roll cast. Then think of the same things you'd do to fish the stream with spinners or bait - fish the seams, edges of holes, drop-offs, etc.... the fish feed in the same places - that doesn't change. You just need to learn to present a fly upstream from the fish, and drift it through the feeding lane. And that doesn't take long looping casts.

The other advise I'd give is not to buy into too much hype or pressure to have 300 different fly patterns in your box. After chasing trout with flies for a couple of decades now, 90% of the fish caught are on the patterns listed above, in various sizes. You don't need the fly of the day that gets pushed in the fly fishing/tying magazines.

As for gear, HighNDry nailed it. My first Henry's Fork expedition was with an old South Bend fiberglass POS fly rod that cast with all the elegance of a broom stick. But I still managed to catch fish. Then I moved up to an Eagle Claw outfit I got at K-Mart for $20, and caught fish. The fish ever see the fly rod, nor can they read the labels. Any rod, or as was pointed out, lever, can throw a fly line.

For reels, Cabelas has a number of reel combos - that come with backing and lines - that will work well enough with your rod. Get one with a 7 weight fly line and you'll be fine. I'd recommend a weight forward floating line.
 

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My first fly rod and reel combo was a Walmart special for $20 bucks and it fished just fine for years. The reel on it didn't have a drag. It did have a small arbor and I didn't even know what backing was. I've never had a trout take me to my backing, and for small rivers the line kink didn't bother me too much. A reel for trout fishing is just a fly line holder. When you're just starting out, get something quality but inexpensive. Aluminum is pretty, but composites are cheaper and just as effective.
 

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One of the most important things to learn is fly fishermen don't call their bobbers, bobbers, they call them strike indicators;-):p
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Haha that's funny bowgy!! If that's the case I have been putting flies with a "strike indicator" on the end of my spinning rod for years!!!

I guess I already had it down.
 
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